PDA

View Full Version : newbie pilot question



Ritter_Cuda
02-26-2005, 05:14 PM
ok i've been trying to do this and I can't figue out what combanation of stick and rudder you use to slide from left to right. ive seen planes arc left and right keeping the none foward. how is this done?
Cuda

Latico
02-26-2005, 06:00 PM
If you mean to slide the plane to one side or the other without turning? I've heard of this being done to line up on a runway or flight deck, when your dirction of travel is good but your position is off to one side or the other.

If I remember correctly, you bank the plane slightely to the side you want to slip over to, and apply a slight bit of rudder in opposition to the planes tendancy to turn towards the bank.

When you bank a plane, it's like driving a car on the side of a slippery embankment. The car tends to want to slip sideways to the down hill side. A plane does the same thing, slipping off to the low wing side.

It's not something you would want to do in a high enrgy maneuver, I don't think.

Anyone got a better explaination?

Covino
02-26-2005, 09:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ritter_Cuda:
ok i've been trying to do this and I can't figue out what combanation of stick and rudder you use to slide from left to right. ive seen planes arc left and right keeping the none foward. how is this done?
Cuda <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If you're talking about online, sometimes internet lag can make it seem like planes are flying a bit sideways but that's not how they see it on their computer. If, you're talking about offline, sometimes the AI does wierd moves and sometimes on final approach for landing they can sort of do strange twists to line up on the runway.

You can however do a "skid" type maneuver which Latico mentions. Bank in the direction you want to slide and apply opposite rudder. This move is used by real-life pilots to compensate for crosswind and it can be used to throw off an enemies aim because it looks like your heading one direction when you're actually sliding another.

atomicali
02-26-2005, 09:43 PM
Yep the manouvre is called a side slip.
It used to be used a lot to slow down aproach speed and increase angle of descent on aircraft without flaps. Also handy for an aircraft with poor forward vis on landing approach as the pilot could look down the side of the nose.
Just watch airspeed tho as too low and the plane can snap in to a spin.
Not good at low altitude :-)
http://www.auf.asn.au/groundschool/umodule8.html
8.5 gives a good description.

Cadet_Bobo
02-27-2005, 05:37 PM
The AI planes like to use full rudder turns too, they turn without banking. Just ease the rudder into full stop one way or the other adjusting your pitch and roll to stay level. Then watch it in the flyby view!

Bobo

Wilburnator
02-27-2005, 06:07 PM
When I was taking flying lessons as a kid my instructor (a friend of my Dad's, and a former P-38 pilot in the war and a former test pilot for Lockheed after the war) always just called it crabbing. You can use it to burn off speed or lose altitude in a hurry as was mentioned above. We mainly used it to line up on the runway while landing in a stiff crosswind. I remember landing a Cessna 152 in a VERY stiff crosswind one day at a little airport in Connecticut. We came in with the nose pointing what seemed to be almost a 45 degree angle from the actual direction of travel. At the last moment, we straightened out and slapped her down on the runway. Lol, I was 17 and scared out of my wits.

In game I do it to burn off speed and land in a hurry.

Ritter_Cuda
02-28-2005, 08:11 AM
tht s the move I s looking for thanks now on to practice... sigh so much to learn so little time to play ;-)
Cuda