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Bo_Nidle
02-24-2011, 10:58 AM
I visited the Nottingham castle museum today. It has a section dedicated to the Sherwood Foresters Regiment and the world war one ace, Albert Ball VC.

http://albertball.homestead.com/frontcover.JPG

I'm currently quite into the WW1 sim "Rise of flight" at the moment. This has lead to an intrest in the pilots involved in that first air war.

One that really has stood out is Albert Ball. He was a leading ace in the Royal Flying Corps with 43 aircraft destroyed plus a ballon.

A brief biography of Ball:

Captain Albert Ball (1896-1917)

Ball, who was born in Nottingham, enlisted with the British Army upon the outbreak of war in August 1914, receiving a commission into the Sherwood Foresters. In time he sought and received a transfer to the Royal Flying Corps.

Rapidly proving himself a natural fighter pilot - invariably flying French Nieuports, which he constantly tweaked in seek of improved manoeuvrability - Ball, unlike many of his British colleagues, gained widespread public renown for his achievements in the air war.

In general the British authorities were less active in putting their air aces to useful propaganda use than either their allies or the German government. Ball was an exception. His penchant for attacking from below (with Lewis machine gun tilted upwards) was dangerous but remarkably successful, giving Ball a dashing reputation.

During the course of his 44 victories - generally achieved while flying alone, his preferred mode of operation - Ball was awarded the MC, DSO and Bar. Following his death on patrol on 7 May 1917 shortly before his twenty-first birthday , he was the posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross.

He has a statue dedicated to him in the grounds of Nottingham Castle.

Some photos I took today that may be of intrest to the members of this community:

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCstatue.jpg

Medals awarded to Ball including his Victoria Cross (first medal on left)
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVC.jpg

Freedom of the City of Nottingham Casket presented to Ball on 19th February 1917
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCa.jpg

Bullet damaged windscreen from SE5A flown by Ball (althoughthe SE5A was not manufactured by Avro?)
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCb.jpg

Bullet damaged carbation intake pipe from Nieuport Scout flown by Ball on the 26th June 1917 when he was with 11 Sqn
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCf.jpg

Balls flying gloves
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCe.jpg

Balls wrist watch and the notification of his death by the Germans in a dispatch dropped over the British lines
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCd.jpg


He was killed in action following a dogfight with Manfred Von Richtofens brother Lothar Von Richtofen. He shot down the German fighter pilot who managed to crash land his aircraft and reported seeing Ball climb into low cloud and then plummet back down out of control. The theory is that Ball became disorientated in the clouds.

He was 20 years old.


The final fight of Ball is depicted in this excellent film made using "Rise of flight".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vadv1-85TeE

It is one of several by the same chap and they are all well worth watching.

Bo_Nidle
02-24-2011, 10:58 AM
I visited the Nottingham castle museum today. It has a section dedicated to the Sherwood Foresters Regiment and the world war one ace, Albert Ball VC.

http://albertball.homestead.com/frontcover.JPG

I'm currently quite into the WW1 sim "Rise of flight" at the moment. This has lead to an intrest in the pilots involved in that first air war.

One that really has stood out is Albert Ball. He was a leading ace in the Royal Flying Corps with 43 aircraft destroyed plus a ballon.

A brief biography of Ball:

Captain Albert Ball (1896-1917)

Ball, who was born in Nottingham, enlisted with the British Army upon the outbreak of war in August 1914, receiving a commission into the Sherwood Foresters. In time he sought and received a transfer to the Royal Flying Corps.

Rapidly proving himself a natural fighter pilot - invariably flying French Nieuports, which he constantly tweaked in seek of improved manoeuvrability - Ball, unlike many of his British colleagues, gained widespread public renown for his achievements in the air war.

In general the British authorities were less active in putting their air aces to useful propaganda use than either their allies or the German government. Ball was an exception. His penchant for attacking from below (with Lewis machine gun tilted upwards) was dangerous but remarkably successful, giving Ball a dashing reputation.

During the course of his 44 victories - generally achieved while flying alone, his preferred mode of operation - Ball was awarded the MC, DSO and Bar. Following his death on patrol on 7 May 1917 shortly before his twenty-first birthday , he was the posthumous recipient of the Victoria Cross.

He has a statue dedicated to him in the grounds of Nottingham Castle.

Some photos I took today that may be of intrest to the members of this community:

http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCstatue.jpg

Medals awarded to Ball including his Victoria Cross (first medal on left)
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVC.jpg

Freedom of the City of Nottingham Casket presented to Ball on 19th February 1917
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCa.jpg

Bullet damaged windscreen from SE5A flown by Ball (althoughthe SE5A was not manufactured by Avro?)
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCb.jpg

Bullet damaged carbation intake pipe from Nieuport Scout flown by Ball on the 26th June 1917 when he was with 11 Sqn
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCf.jpg

Balls flying gloves
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCe.jpg

Balls wrist watch and the notification of his death by the Germans in a dispatch dropped over the British lines
http://i19.photobucket.com/albums/b194/BoNidle/AlbertBallVCd.jpg


He was killed in action following a dogfight with Manfred Von Richtofens brother Lothar Von Richtofen. He shot down the German fighter pilot who managed to crash land his aircraft and reported seeing Ball climb into low cloud and then plummet back down out of control. The theory is that Ball became disorientated in the clouds.

He was 20 years old.


The final fight of Ball is depicted in this excellent film made using "Rise of flight".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vadv1-85TeE

It is one of several by the same chap and they are all well worth watching.

M_Gunz
02-24-2011, 01:07 PM
Was he the one who would dance around a fire playing a fiddle the night after a victory? A Lone Wolf Legend?

Bo_Nidle
02-24-2011, 01:46 PM
I have never read that about him and to be honest from what I have read it does not sound like something he would do.

He was, by all accounts, a very quiet and modest individual.

He was something of a lone wolf but his idea of fun was tending the garden and vegetable patch he had created on the field next to his personal garden shed!

Stiletto-
02-24-2011, 02:19 PM
Thanks for posting Bo. I myself got into flight sims more or less do to dynamix's Red Baron in the early 90s, where I would then challenge and study the history of the aces in the game, Ball being one of them of course. Great photos.. as for the Avro windscreen, I do not no for sure but I think the Se5a was manufactured at a number of different plants and even if not avro, I would think that certain parts and pieces being manufactured at plants that did not produce the whole plane, might have been common place.

As for Gisbods excellent Rise of Flight vids.. Viewing those is what finally made me bite the bullet and purchase RoF, coupled with the black friday airplane sale. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

SteamBat
02-25-2011, 02:57 AM
Thanks for sharing that B_Nidle. I only recently discovered that my grandfather served in the Sherwood Foresters in 1915/16 so I find your article and pictures very intersting. Will definatly make the effort to visit this museum in the summer.