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View Full Version : OT: The Unofficial IL-2 Better-Health Group: Fat Reduction



Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 09:30 PM
Hi guys,

The IL-2 series has been very interesting, very enjoyable, very time consuming, and very unhealthy for a lot of us.

Late last year I realized that due to this forum and the game, not only my knowledge of history and WW2 planes had grown but I had also grown to 115kg/253lbs. Although I am 1.825m/6ft, large framed, that's a little too much weight for me.

I decided to do a little research on fat reduction. What I found was that there are a million diets to choose from but very few actually seemed logical.

I ended up putting my own plan together based on fact and logic and came up with something that worked very well. In less than 3 months I lost 20kg/44lbs, had more energy, and even slept better, all with minimal to no exercise.

I was able to wear clothes I hadn't worn since I was in my early 20's. BTW, I am 40 now. In the last 6 months I've forgotten the diet and done no exercise and therefore, am starting to broaden horizontally.

So, I've decided to get back on my plan but more seriously than before. I was also thinking that we, the community, have a lot more in common that just this sim, but related to the time we afford this sim. I willing to bet a large(pardon the pun)group os us need to improve our health.

The first step to losing fat is understanding the process and how we are effected by our foods.

I do believe this could be a useful and interesting thread.

Who's in the "IL-2 Better-Health" support group? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 09:30 PM
Hi guys,

The IL-2 series has been very interesting, very enjoyable, very time consuming, and very unhealthy for a lot of us.

Late last year I realized that due to this forum and the game, not only my knowledge of history and WW2 planes had grown but I had also grown to 115kg/253lbs. Although I am 1.825m/6ft, large framed, that's a little too much weight for me.

I decided to do a little research on fat reduction. What I found was that there are a million diets to choose from but very few actually seemed logical.

I ended up putting my own plan together based on fact and logic and came up with something that worked very well. In less than 3 months I lost 20kg/44lbs, had more energy, and even slept better, all with minimal to no exercise.

I was able to wear clothes I hadn't worn since I was in my early 20's. BTW, I am 40 now. In the last 6 months I've forgotten the diet and done no exercise and therefore, am starting to broaden horizontally.

So, I've decided to get back on my plan but more seriously than before. I was also thinking that we, the community, have a lot more in common that just this sim, but related to the time we afford this sim. I willing to bet a large(pardon the pun)group os us need to improve our health.

The first step to losing fat is understanding the process and how we are effected by our foods.

I do believe this could be a useful and interesting thread.

Who's in the "IL-2 Better-Health" support group? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Fritz

Professor_1942
08-20-2006, 09:35 PM
I'm starting to get fat too. I eat way too much bread. Help me.

Haigotron
08-20-2006, 09:41 PM
I totally agree, although i exercise, i sometimes feel guilty after a few hours or playing il2 (or any game) sitting at the comp http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Waldo.Pepper
08-20-2006, 09:45 PM
Eat this!

Walk and ride a bike.

I lost a pound a day doing this a few years ago, for a total of 57 pounds. It worked like a charm for me and the Mrs.

http://www.idiet4u.com/diets/sacredheart.html

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 09:58 PM
One thing I find interesting is that with all the available info out there, individually we know so little about fat and how and why it's stored.

I used to think it was strange that my stomach was big but the fat between my abs and skin was not so thick. I had a theory but it wasn't until I had my appendix removed that I was able to confirm.

After my surgery, I questioned the surgeon on what he had seen in side me. As I suspected, underneath my abs and surrounding my organs was a lot of fat. This explained why my stomach was so big.

What is the importance of this?

Well, it helps the mental aspect of fat loss. Many people start and soon give up their diets. I tried to do research into this but found little or nothing. What I did realize, is that it was mental. Giving up on dieting and exercise, in my opion, is all about expectations and knowledge, or lack of.

Diet manuals tend to use words such as "quick", "fast", "in no time". This is marketing and nothing more. It was these words that got you hooked. I lost 20kgs/44lbs in less than three months, without a hunger strike or exercise, and that's extremely fast.

Many people set their fat loss goals based on success stories they've read. Remember, we are not created equal nor should we expect equal results. Not reaching your goals or expectations is enough to make you drop your diet plan. Setting your goals too high is a recipe for disaster.

I decided to start without fat loss goals but instead made strategic goals. My goals were to stick with a plan relative to time. Mental preparation.

Another mistake people commonly make is measuring their fat loss on a weight scale. This is a very inaccurate and misleading way to measure your success.

Think "size". This is the only easy and accurate way to measure your fat loss. If you begin a program, take a pair of pants and shirt that you find fits your present shape perfectly. Get dressed and make some photos from many angles, in relaxed standing and sitting positions. Do not wash or wear them once the photos are taken. Put the clothes in a safe place(to avoid washing them)and promise yourself you will not try them on again until you are 1 month into the program. They will not lie or mislead you. They will be an accurate measuring device.

Later I will right about knowledge.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 10:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Professor_1942:
I'm starting to get fat too. I eat way too much bread. Help me. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No problem. I instructed Antonio to put a price on your baker's head. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 10:20 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Professor_1942:
I'm starting to get fat too. I eat way too much bread. Help me. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I love bread. I grew up(and out) on bread but, besides having a lot of nutrition, it has a lot of fat.

Pumpernickel and Vollkorn are not only very low in fat, nutritious, but also very tasty and filling. Go to a good store that sells German breads. It's easy to find and relatively inexpensive.

With every bite, take a little water. You'll find just one slice can be very filling. Don't eat this after 3 o'clock.

Timing is very important. Our metabolic rate peaks at around 8 in the morning and slowly decreases through the day. This is how eating at night makes you fat. This is why we can sleep at night. With your metabolic rate reduced, your body tends to store food as fat when you eat at night. My rule is, nothing after 8pm.

Foods such as grains and starch require much more work to digest. These are morning foods. This is where we get our energy for the day. I found it was good to eat half an apple in the morning with a slice of pumpernickel. The apple gives you fast energy while you're waiting for the long term energy to come from the bread. You need this energy to burn fat.

BTW, drink water everytime you eat. This works both as a filler and makes digestion much more efficient.

Eat small amounts but eat when you are hungry. 3 squares a day is actually unhealthy as your stomach is being stretched, your digestive system over worked, and your body tends to store more fat as if there wasn't enough food in your environment.

Your stomach has no eye nor ears. It's reacts to the environment you provide. Just imagine if you were a stomach. You receive food in large quantities, three times a day and usually after you've become hungry. Logically, you'd feel the food supply is not consistant and therefore decide it's in your best interest to store some as fact.

Feed the beast before it gets hungry. From the stomach's POV, there won't seem to be any shortage. Food is readily available, even in small quantities. That's good enough, no need to store fat. Let's give our chassis some extra energy. Hell, why not burn a little of our savings. Times are good.

It may sound a little corny, but it is this very logic that worked for me.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 10:31 PM
Our stomachs, the organ, not the abs, is a truly amazing piece of evolutionary work. It adapts to its environment very quickly. This is key to losing fat.

Our stomachs can expand and shrink in size in as little as a few days. The first days of any diet are the most difficult. The stomach's size is relative to the amount of food we fill it with. Hunger is relative to the stomach's size.

By eating small amounts frequently, less than the size of an average apple, your stomach will quickly shrink to suit it's new environment, thus ending the feeling of hunger. This can happen in less than a week.

6 or less small meals a day, before you feel hungry, will shrink the stomach. After a week or so, you can decrease the size of each meal, but don't decrease the frequency. Get into the habit of being consistent. This will also regulate your metabolism, therefore your energy and sleep.

Shrink the stomach, shrink the hunger.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-20-2006, 10:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
Eat this!

Walk and ride a bike.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Of course exercise speeds up the process and is great for the health. A good diet and exercise is all that's needed to lose fat.

Fritz

isooAntti
08-21-2006, 03:31 AM
Ja, gut!
Me und Hermann are gecoming on the big side..allvays zitting here in ze bonker....perhaps diese blausüre kapsülen might hilfen?

WOLFMondo
08-21-2006, 03:43 AM
I changed my diet after medical advice so I don't eat bread any more and avoid wheat based products and most dairy produce too, i feel allot better for it. I'm not a vegematarian but don't eat red meat all that much any more either. I can't get out of 3 meals a day though, its just the way my day pans out that its never a viable option.

Now I just need to give up smoking.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:


Who's in the "IL-2 Better-Health" support group? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm in! I eat healthy and go to the gym everyday.

Feathered_IV
08-21-2006, 03:48 AM
Is it true that not eating regularly can make you gain weight too? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Seems odd, but thats what people are saying lately (and I seem to be seeing a little evidence of the fact, now that I have three jobs and skip meals http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif)

sukebeboy
08-21-2006, 04:30 AM
Don't just think size! You have to think of muscle mass. It's not difficult to lose large amounts of weight when you initially start a diet/exercise regimen, but if you aren't eating properly, much of that weight loss will come from water and muscle tissue, not fat. The end result is that while your overall weight may have dropped, your body fat percentage might have actually increased. Try to find a place with a Bio-electric Impedence measuring machine. Most sports clubs will have one. The results are not completely accurate (I've measured myself at 15% body fat in the morning and 18% later the same day with the same machine) but they'll give you a good ball park figure.

Only weigh yourself once a week, max. You're going to have fluctuations and if you obsess about it every day, you'll likely quit in frustration.

Start exercising. Find something you enjoy doing and that is convienent for you to do at least three times a week. If it's something that's going to require a lot of travel, organization or time, chances are you'll make excuses not to do it. Try to mix strength training with at least 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise. I lift weights 5 days a week and alternate between riding a bike, swimming and roller blading.

As for diet, there's a lot of conflicting information out there. I found that the Zone diet works for me when I'm back in North America, but here in Japan, it's a lot harder to follow (especially as I'm allergic to many types of seafood.) One book I read called Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle helped explain the metabolic differences between endomorphic, mesomorphic, and ectomorphic body types and what kind of diet/eating schedule you should shoot for.

I was much like the original poster. Two years ago, I found I'd shot up from 105 Kilos/8% body fat (182 cm tall)) to 122 kilos/27% body fat due to a combination of not enough excercise, a lazy man diet and far too much boozing on the weekends (hard to avoid that in Asia). I started on the Zone diet, cut back on the drinking somewhat and made an effort to add more medium/high intensity cardiovascular exercise to my life. I lost 17 kilos in one year.

Sadly, I ended up tearing the ligaments in my left knee in a rugby game and, though I knew better, knew I could still go swimming, do upper body workouts, etc, I ended up feeling sorry for myself, turning to comfort foods and hitting the bars again. In 4 months, I was back up to 118 kilos.

Thankfully, the knee is much better now, and I'm back on the workout routine. Cardio's still a bit rough as the knee hurts and right now it's insanely hot and humid here in Japan. (the only sports club in town doesn't have A/C so I'm dribbling like grannie just from changing my shirt in the locker room. I swim a lot in the fall and winter months but the swimming pool doesn't have a pump filtration system. They only change the water once a week so just before change day, it's pretty filthy at the best of times. In summer when it's full of kid pee, and sloughed of grannie skin, I just can't cope.)

ytareh
08-21-2006, 05:19 AM
Sign me up PJ!!!!!Im a former Irish cycling champion and once ran two marathons in a week ....my addiction to the original IL2 overlapped with my departure from serious sports and Ive gone from 11 stone(14 pounds to a stone-2.2 pounds to a kilo) to 15 in about two or three years.Im 35 and have just had a baby girl so the outlook for serious fitness activity dont look good!!!By the way even disregarding the weight issues being hunched over the joystick for 4-6 hour sessions doesnt help the old spine !!!
How about an IL2 fitness club where you can log your weekly/monthly weight loss or 'training'!!!???Now that would be "interesting".Id really feel guilty about my 8 Cornetto (European Ice Cream cone) 'benders' then!!!
OT???Well if they can have a Bass fishing thread......!!!

XyZspineZyX
08-21-2006, 05:52 AM
All I can say is train & train hard. Make fitness part of your life. Start off slow with what ever exercise program you wish to undertake. Make sure you enjoy it, this is critical. Good exercise is like good food, you want to keep going back for more.

I never watch what I eat but I do monitor my training activities & this is what has kept me in reasonable shape. I find everybody is different so to get the results you want you must find what your body responds to & then maintain this sort of activity for the rest of your life. Its ok to have a break (I have just had 3 months off because my drive disappeared) but you must start again.

My 3 cents worth
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

ImpStarDuece
08-21-2006, 06:03 AM
This is going to sound a little like boasting but,

I exercise 6-8 times a week, depending on my work schedule. Sounds a little insane and excessive when I write it down, but its what keeps me happy.

I do acrobatics/gymnastics twice a week, capoeria twice a week, triathlon training twice a week (bike and/or swim) and then weights/other at least once a week, usually something like a Hash (http://www.gthhh.com/) or fun run. I'd train capoeira four times a week if I could, but I just can't find classes close enough.

In my final year of high school I managed to break my left ankle twice and my right ankle once and had to have ligament operations. I spent a grand total of 20 weeks on crutches and then managed to catch a dose of glandular fever that put me into bed for another 4! My fitness went from being a back up 1500m runner for the school athletics squad to absolute rock bottom. Under doctors orders I had to wait 6 months before i could do 'vigorous exercise' - not something thats easy when your 18, for more reasons that you might think in polite company...

The biggest things I've found are:

1. Find something you LOVE doing. Exercise should be enjoyable. I will never understand people who pile into the gym or jump on a treadmill and complain about their fitness routine or the pain they are under. If you don't like it, STOP and find something you do like. If it hurts STOP. That is you body telling you something isn't right. I have a friend who plays tennis for 40-60 minutes a day, at least 5 times a week, just because he loves doing that.

2. Variation. Don't do the same thing over and over again and exercise with different groups of people. I train at 3-4 different sports (acro, cap, triathlon and long distance) with 3 different groups of people. The fresh faces and fresh outlooks keep me motivated. P.S. Sex counts as exercise.

3. Whole life attitude. Make exercise part of who you are. Its not something to be filed into its own seperate column. It should be part of your routine. There are some days at work where all that gets me motivated is a capioera song or a bilang.com (great sight for all you loopkicks fans out there BTW) sampler.

4. DO NOT DIET. Read up on health, nutritional diets, balanced meals, correct nutrition, ask someone who knows about that stuff, but do not diet unless told to by a health professional. Eat health(ier) but eat what you want, not according to some plan. Inevitably people break their diet and then go completely overboard to compensate, and then get fed up with the whole thing and revert to old (or worse) habits. Enyoy your food, eat junk occasionally, reward yourself when you want. Just remember the basics of nutrition in your everyday meals.

5. Don't stress weight gain. Every time I ramp up a training program I stack on about 5 kg. Weight fluctuates within a range of about 10 kg (+/- 5) for a elite athlete in a training cycle, so why should you be any different? Its DIFFICULT to change your body mass permanently (either to put on or lose weight) and your body will sacrifice a lot (including brain tissue in some cases) instead of going below certain body mass/body fat levels unless done properly.

MEGILE
08-21-2006, 07:06 AM
Hey Pirsch I know your pain..

When I started working out I was a tiny 51kg... at 5 foot 10 that is stupidly skinngy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif
If you think loosing weight is hard, you should try being a hard gainer like me.
That was 3 months ago though, the weight is slowly creeping up.

I have to do some serious reps in the gym, and force myself to eat when I don't want to, to try and get an ounce of muscle on my body.

To be honest though, I love the challenge... and I like to see the KG on the barbell go up every few weeks.

6 Days a week... split excersises.

Gimme 5 years, and I will be Arnie http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Infact I bought his encyclopedia of modern bodybuilding, and its a fantastic book.

Off to do some reps... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/partyhat.gif

slipBall
08-21-2006, 07:26 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Megile:
Hey Pirsch I know your pain..

When I started working out I was a tiny 51kg... at 5 foot 10 that is stupidly skinngy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif
If you think loosing weight is hard, you should try being a hard gainer like me.
That was 3 months ago though, the weight is slowly creeping up.

I have to do some serious reps in the gym, and force myself to eat when I don't want to, to try and get an ounce of muscle on my body.

To be honest though, I love the challenge... and I like to see the KG on the barbell go up every few weeks.

6 Days a week... split excersises.

Gimme 5 years, and I will be Arnie http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Infact I bought his encyclopedia of modern bodybuilding, and its a fantastic book.

Off to do some reps... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/partyhat.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

4 of these per day should do it,
Eat up!



http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/0386.jpg


http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/broetchen.jpg

AlGroover
08-21-2006, 07:39 AM
Eat less, exercise more. Energy in, energy out. The truth is brutal. What seems to have changed in recent years is most folks perception of normal portion size. As a quick check ask lean people you know and fat people you know, what is their weekly bill for groceries. I was shocked. Fat people spend twice as much on food as their lean counterparts. This takes no account of type or quality of food or calorie content nor anything to do with exercise. Just a simple observation. if you don't buy it, you don't eat it.

ytareh
08-21-2006, 08:26 AM
Whats CAPOEIRA ImpStarDeuce?And Al speaks the truth...If you dont buy it you cant eat it!!!(the biggest battle is in the supermarket/foodstore)

lowfighter
08-21-2006, 08:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by isooAntti:
Ja, gut!
Me und Hermann are gecoming on the big side..allvays zitting here in ze bonker....perhaps diese blausüre kapsülen might hilfen? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Veleichte trunken not so viele Beeren in ze bonker mokte holfen camarade! Schüss!

triad773
08-21-2006, 08:51 AM
Timely topic for me! I am nearing completion of remodelling my kitchen, and after 5 months I have packed on 20-25 lbs! Eating out too much, fast or convenient food-- bad stuff when it's daily fare. But the project's almost done. What I had found works in the past (and I am kean to get back on with it,) is substituting turkey which is higher in protein and leaner than chicken, or beef. Salads too can be more than just 'rabbit food' if paired with things like feta cheese (in moderation), black olive and peppers- a simple oil and vinegar dressing, and it's good. Especially with hot weather, it seems like the body (at least mine anyway) has an easier time metabolizing lighter foods like that. I NEED to stay away from the beers, and wines, and go to things like Vodka and seltzer. More bang for the calories! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

Oh and walking anywhere I really don't need to drive to. not only is it healthy, it saves on polution-- or at least what I would've contributed.

Glad to see this topic here.

panther3485
08-21-2006, 08:55 AM
I think I could get some benefit from this idea, so count me in as well. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

I'm 185cm and 97 Kg. Not as bad as some cases, but I would like my weight to be no more than 90 Kg and preferably around 88 Kg.

I'm also 53 years old, with a spinal injury (anterior wedge fracture of 2nd lumbar vertebra, sustained during a parachuting accident in military service, when I was 28) and a serious knee injury (totally shattered in a motorcycle accident four years ago - I nearly lost the leg).

These injuries put some restrictions on the type and vigor of exercises I can do, but I still manage to do some.

My doctor reckons that despite the damages to my body, all considered he rates me as being in good overall condition ( !!!!!!?????? ) for a man my age!

So I guess I must have been doing something right all this time.

Having said that, over the last few years since my knee injury is when I gained most of the extra weight (I was 91 Kg when it happened). This is due, I believe, to more sedentary work, more time in front of the computer etc. Add to this, the fact that I tend to eat more snacks. If I continue this way, my weight could easily increase further, to dangerous proportions, so I want to 'nip it in the bud' and hopefully get myself back to my pre-accident weight.

So, like I said, count me in!


Best regards, http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
panther3485

FI.RULES
08-21-2006, 09:34 AM
Know the feeling....
After 12 years of Army life, something changed my vaist-line:-)
From 95kg to 115kg in a hart-beat.
A big problem for formely active persons is that you don´t change your intake as you change your amount of exercise...Big meal´s are the norm in all Army´s as far as I have seen. and the level of exercise is in par with intake. After a long break with lot´s of beer and junk-food i came to terms with the fact that I needed to change my way of life, and stoped all intake of added sugar. Natural sugar is nothing to worry about, it´s the added sugar that make´s you blobby.
Allso cut down on alcohol, chip´s and all other thing´s you know you don´t need.
Let the car rest now and then, take a walk or even better run. I started to take my bicykle or to run to work and all in all I´m back to my fighting weight. it take´s some time and it´s hard at times but...It´s worth it...
Skip a mission of the game and take a nice slow walk with your gf, wife, kid´s or someone you like. You will not only feel better, you will allso do better in the game(promise)
Have fun you all.

faustnik
08-21-2006, 12:28 PM
I excercise a lot, weight lifting, hiking, bike riding, but, I like eating more. Meat, cheese, pasta, pizza (pizza is its own food group) it's all good. It's better to be fatback than a ******. Do a little exercise and don't worry about it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

BSS_AIJO
08-21-2006, 12:40 PM
bleh!

Weight loss is a pain in the ascii. I am 5'10" so 170lbs is pretty much the happy weight. Back when I was married and under non-stop stress I peaked at 260. 8^P It was disgusting, I started starving myself and got down a bit but it was very troublesome. Then I got divorced and quickly fell to 230. THat was better.. Then I got bells palsy and for a few months did not have controll of my face enough to actually consume food. I was loesing a few lbs per week, and without warning was suddenly 175lbs. It was great. 8^) At the same time I had decided to stop paying for parking at work and saw parking for free about a 15 minute walk from work. I was making that walk 4 times a day so was getting an hour of walking per day as well and not being much able to eat. Then just as I started to be able to handle food I moved into the new house and had no fridge or stove for about two months. That also kept me away from food. Finally I bottomed out at 165, and suddenly cloths looked really good on me. Then the evil demon mother needed a place to stay for a bit. Turned out to be 9 months of stress and hell. I turned to my trusty freinds, potatoe chips and cheetos to make things better... Suddenly I was back at 220 and thanks to the stess I was going grey and my hair was falling out. Since she moved on, I have my hair back and have droped back down to 200, I am working on crossing the 200 barrier now. The secret has been very low calories. I also cheeted and looked up the pro-ana websites and read their hints and tips on weighloss. Unlike fake Dr's selling bopoks for money the anaorexic crowd are pro-weightloss experts. It it results in weighing less they will use it. So, I tried a few of their tips and have cut back to roughly 1000 calories spread thinly across the day, I am also taking calcium + D to help with metqabolizing stored fat and the results have been fairly quick and noticeable though not crazy dramaticly fast. Which I am fine with as I refuse to beat myself up over how fast the weight falls off and am more than willing to occasionally cheat like hell to enjoy something good like, indian food or PIzza, or really good ice cream. 8^) With my new job I am working 9 or 10 hours a day and commuting on my butt in the car for 3 or 4 more hours. Not leaving lots of time for walking. But, I am also doing all of the general contracting on my home projects. If you want a real work out haul 100 5 gallon buckets of plaster chunks down two flights of stairs and across the yar to heav them into a big dumpster, then spend a whole day pounding really big nails into old oak 2x10's with a 5lbs mallet.. Then haul 10 3/4 inch 4x8 sheets of subfloor back up the stairs. Soon, I will have the drywall weekend. Finally the real workouts, joint plaster and painting with just a roller.

The weightloss has been making my Dr. pretty happy.. I am a type 1 so less excess lbs means less insulin needed and finer bloodsuger control. That means a longer more enjoyable life. Finally yes, when you are eating the right amounts of good food it costs a heck of alot less than eating piles of ****.


BSS_AIJO

zero85ZEN
08-21-2006, 12:57 PM
I rode this:

http://img211.imageshack.us/img211/408/recordoclvzq5.jpg

63.5 miles this past Saturday and another 40 miles on Sunday. When my weight tips over 150 lbs. (I'm 5'11") I start to feel "fat".

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

F6_Ace
08-21-2006, 01:45 PM
I took up cycling a couple of years ago and was doing 80 miles a week on average.

Did I lose any weight? Nope.
Did I look trimmer? Possibly.
Did it help that I sought out every real ale pub within a 50 mile radius as excuses for routes planned? Not one iota.


I then spent a summer eating ****, attending beer festivals but doing at least an eight mile walk at some point in the week and I lost a stone in 5 months.

It's no wonder that all those Tour de France boys are high on drugs...they're probably slimming and not performance aids http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 08:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Feathered_IV:
Is it true that not eating regularly can make you gain weight too? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Seems odd, but thats what people are saying lately (and I seem to be seeing a little evidence of the fact, now that I have three jobs and skip meals http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It is true. Since I returned to China I have started gaining weight again. I'm not eating a lot either. The problem is the irregularity. I end up having to eat late at night and next to nothing in the morning.

Here in Beijing work is number 1, over family, health, everything. Add this to the Chinese food which is very fatty from oils and not very nutritional due to their cooking style. It's difficult and very expensive to get healthy food here. It take a lot of planning to eat properly here and almost impossible to eat regularly.

When you don't eat regularly, your system tends to store fat, especially if you lack exercise, and when you don't eat regularly, it's hard to get inspired to exercise.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 08:55 PM
Sukebeboy,

I know of the Burn the Fat,Feed the Muscle approach and completely agree with it. I got a lot of ideas from Joe Venuto. I haven't read the book but I consistantly get emails from his organization.

I'll post something he wrote about "the caveman diet" but I want to add an important point that he forgot to mention.

I like and agree with the caveman diet. It's simply logical. But he doesn't mention the frequency of eating in his letter. That's a very important point to eating healthy and losing fat. We are designed for a caveman diet, not the c r a p we eat today. The way we eat now is new to humans and evolution hasn't caught up yet, henceforth fat and disease.

The caveman didn't eat meals unless they killed something big. That wouldn't have happened to often either. They were hunters and gatherers but not equally. Mostly, as a gatherer, the caveman would have eaten little bits frequently. That's the way we are designed. We were not designed for meals. We are also designed to store fat when we eat large. That gives you an idea that we rarely ate big meals due to the rarity of catching and killing large animals. It makes sense to eat small but frequently doesn't it?

Here's what Tom wrote:

QUESTION:

Hi Tom,

Your Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle ebook was an eye-opener for me. I am
following your advice closely with very good results. I'm a semi professional
windsurfer and a mountain biker, and especially for the latter I need to
be as lean as possible. Thanks in large part to your program, I'm well into
a single digit body fat and dropping.

Just recently I came across a book called the paleolithic diet and I was
wondering if you ever heard about it? What's your opinion on this book? Is
it worth reading if I already have your book? Is the program any good?

Regards,

Mariusz G.
Poland


ANSWER:

The "paleolithic," "stone age," "cave man," or "neanderthal" eating plans have
been around for a while and there are quite a few books that have been written
on the subject.

In general, with a only few minor constructive criticisms, I think they are
right on point, and will benefit your health and definitely your fat
loss efforts.

A "Paleo Diet" is actually quite similar to my Burn The Fat program, only with
the starches and grains (and dairy products) removed completely.

In fact, a "paleo" or "cave man" diet is very, very similar to the "contest"
(bodybuilding or physique) diets I recommend in Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle
and this is most definitely a great way get very lean, very fast.

On physique competition diets (bodybuilding, fitness, figure, etc), you leave
the lean proteins, lean meats, nuts and seeds, the green veggies (fibrous carbs),
and some fruit in the diet, while reducing or removing ALL processed foods and
SOME of the grains and starches. (usually the dairy products go too).

When it comes to MAXIMUM FAT LOSS, the removal or reduction of grains and
calorie dense starchy carbs in favor of lean protein and veggies will
definitely help speed the process - even if that's only because it reduces
caloric density of the food intake, although there are other reasons.

Lean protein (fish and meat) + good fats & nuts + lots of green veggies + some fruit = LEAN!

And thats basically what the "paleolithic" diets recommend, because the principle
there is to eat like our "stone age" ancestors did - before there was McDonalds,
Coca Cola and other junk food.

The premise is that since our genetic code (the human genome) has changed
less than 0.02 percent in 40,000 years, this means that our bodies are still
expecting to get the same foods and nutrition they were getting 40,000 years ago.

By eating what our "stone age" hunter and gatherer ancestors ate, say the paleo
diets, we will rid ourselves of the health problems and the obesity problem that
has only recently begun to plague us as a result of modern lifestyle and processed
manmade foods.

Forty thousand years ago, you had to eat nature-made food. There was no food in cans,
boxes or packages was there? The packaging was peel, a skin or a shell!

There were no TV dinners. There was no drive in fast food. There were
no convenience stores.

There was no corn syrup. There was no white sugar. There were no hydrogenated
oils. No chemicals. No preservatives. No artificial anything

There was only what could be hunted and gathered: Meat, fish, nuts, seeds, plants,
vegetables, fruits.

My only real constructive criticism is that some of these programs not only
recommend removal of all grains and starches (and even dairy), they outright
condemn them - sometimes unfairly, I believe.

They say that agriculture arrived on the scence only 10,000 years ago
so foods produced as a result of agriculture should also be on the "banned"
list and that includes 100% whole grain products and even rice, potatoes
and other starches which are not manmade.

the truth is there are some starchy carbohydrates and grains which are very
minimally processed or completely unproceseed (the only processing being
cooking).

Also, some people can metabolically handle starches and grains just fine,
while others cannot. The same can be said for dairy products.

This is known as metabolic individuality. Because this individuality exists
from person to person, I don't believe it's necessary to recommend that
"EVERYONE" cut out "ALL" the starches and grains "ALL" the time.

I do believe that many people are getting an overdose of refined carbs and
sugar and that moderating intake of concentrated carbs almost always
accelerates fat loss.

However, the nutrition program you choose should depend on your metabolic/body
type, your current body composition and state of health as well as your goals
(maximum fat loss vs. muscle growth vs. maintenance, vs. endurance
athleticperformance).

I don't believe that "agriculture" and everything that came with it is "evil."

I believe that highly processed and refined and packaged foods are the
"nutritional evils" we should be aware of.

To remove brown rice, 100% whole grains, sweet potatoes, oatmeal, legumes
and so on for healthy carb tolerant people, especially those who are highly
active and or already at a normal body fat level doesnt make a lot of sense to me.

In particular, for athletes with a high energy expenditure, eating the
concentrated complex, starchy carbs and grains - from natural sources -
can be quite important.

Sure, there are some "renegade' nutritionists who prescribe high fat diets
for endurance athletes and claim that will provide high energy and high
performance, but that is controversial.

Also, an explanation for athletes successful on such plans may be that they
are metabolically suited for more fat and protein to begin with, so that
conclusion shouldn't be generalized to everyone.

thats the trouble with so many programs -- the creators might say,
"It worked for me and for some of my clients, so this is the way EVERYONE
should do it."

Everyone is different, so the true inquiring minds will inquire about
what is best for THEM, not the other guy... In the case of highly active
healthy people and athletes, I would lean towards a decent amount of natural
carbs forperformance goals (and pull back on starches and grains when
goals change to maximum fat loss).

The key word here is NATURAL!

There is a HUGE difference between natural starches and grains
and refined starches and grains.

For example, look at old fashioned unsweetened oatmeal versus sugary, white
flour cereal grains. How can you throw those together into the same category???
They are no where near the same, but often they get lumped together by those
who are adamantly "no-grain" or "no-cereal" allowed.

What about sweet potatoes? why cut something like that out
of your diet? They are not processed or man made at all are they?

Aside from that minor quibble I have with some of these programs being
too strict with their "Absolutely no grains or starch allowed," there is
a lot anyone can learn from the "paleolithic" eating concept.

The questions raised from these programs and books are good ones:

"What were we eating tens of thousands of years ago?"

"What are we genetically and environmentally predisposed to eat?"

"what has gone wrong with the modern day diet that has led to
so much disease and obesity which didn't exist thousands of years ago?"

I believe that too many people get caught up in low fats or low carbs or whatever
the trend of the month is, but the real source of our problem is neither fat
nor carbs, it is an excess of processed, refined man-made food! (combined with a
serious shortage of exercise)

If you study and understand the concept of eating according to your personal
goals and your unique body/metabolic type first, which I discuss in chapter
5 of my book, Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle, then I believe you will get
even more benefit from the further study of the "paleo" eating concept, as you
will be informed and flexible enough to adapt it to your personal situation.

Loren Cordain and Ray Audette have written two of the more notable works
on the subject (the Paleo diet and Neanderthin). You can get either of these
at almost any bookstore or Amazon.com. You can get my Burn The Fat program at
http://www.burnthefat.com

ANY good nutrition program - for health or for fat loss - is going to be
focused on natural foods and it will teach you how to get the
processed food OUT and the natural food IN

keep in mind what Fitness Icon Jack Lalanne has always said,

"If man made it, dont eat it!"

THAT is the essence of eating how we're supposed to eat!

Until next week, train hard and expect success,

Your friend and coach,

Tom Venuto, NSCA-CPT, CSCS
Certified Personal Trainer
Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist
Fat Loss Coach
http://www.burnthefat.com
http://www.burnthefatmp3.com
http://www.burnthefatinnercircle.com

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 09:00 PM
Hi Dasriech,

what's your inspiration to get started?

I found that watching an action movie, where the star was in tiptop shape or watching sports gets me inpired.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 09:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ImpStarDuece:
4. DO NOT DIET. Read up on health, nutritional diets, balanced meals, correct nutrition, ask someone who knows about that stuff, but do not diet unless told to by a health professional. Eat health(ier) but eat what you want, not according to some plan. Inevitably people break their diet and then go completely overboard to compensate, and then get fed up with the whole thing and revert to old (or worse) habits. Enyoy your food, eat junk occasionally, reward yourself when you want. Just remember the basics of nutrition in your everyday meals.

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Just remember the basics of nutrition in your everyday meals.

That is dieting. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

But I know what you mean. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Too many people can't distinguish the difference between dieting and starving one's self. That's due to a lack of knowledge and understanding. That's why I started this thread.

We're not alone. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 09:17 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Megile:
Hey Pirsch I know your pain..

When I started working out I was a tiny 51kg... at 5 foot 10 that is stupidly skinngy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif
If you think loosing weight is hard, you should try being a hard gainer like me.
That was 3 months ago though, the weight is slowly creeping up.

I have to do some serious reps in the gym, and force myself to eat when I don't want to, to try and get an ounce of muscle on my body.

To be honest though, I love the challenge... and I like to see the KG on the barbell go up every few weeks.

6 Days a week... split excersises.

Gimme 5 years, and I will be Arnie http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Infact I bought his encyclopedia of modern bodybuilding, and its a fantastic book.

Off to do some reps... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/partyhat.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Age is a major factor in gaining muscle. When I was in my early 20's, I was a flag pole. No matter how much I worked out, I just could gain weight.

I lifted a few years ago and made great gains. I'm 40 now.

But you mentioned doing a lot of reps in the gym. Don't "over rep". If you want to gain mass and bulk, then use lower reps and heavier weights.

The idea is to rip the muscles at the microscopic scale. I liked doing "supersets" at the end of my workout.

If I had worked on my back and was finished my routine, I'd then do one set of every exercise I had done. This is best with a partner.

Example: lateral pulldowns

Since 220 was my max in my set, I'd start with 180 for my superset. I'd do 20 reps and as soon as I reached 20, my partner would change the weight pin from 180 to 160. Then 20 reps again. Then 160 to 140, 20 reps. I would do this until I was at the last bit of weight. Believe me when I say, you'll feel it the next few days.

Be sure to get lots of sleep. Muscles only grow during sleep.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 09:22 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FI.RULES:

Skip a mission of the game and take a nice slow walk with your gf, wife, kid´s or someone you like. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ha ha ha, "or someone you like" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

That's a classic http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-21-2006, 09:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by faustnik:
I excercise a lot, weight lifting, hiking, bike riding, but, I like eating more. Meat, cheese, pasta, pizza (pizza is its own food group) it's all good. It's better to be fatback than a ******. Do a little exercise and don't worry about it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

He he he, the difference is, you are already in shape. Many of us need to get inshape in order to justify eating the good stuff.

A couple years ago I worked out like crazy and maintained my regular diet. I gained muscle and endurance but I lost no fat% according to the BMI machine at the gym. I was squatting 250kg/550lbs in my final set and that was 10 reps. My last set for flies was 8 reps with 60kg/132lbs dumbbells.

BTW, I was doing 1 hr on the crosstrainer before I lifted and 1 hr after. After 3 months, I had lost no fat%.

Later I realized, a diet is just as important as the exercise, when you are already overweight.

Fritz

joeap
08-22-2006, 01:57 AM
Well I come late to this thread, as another overweight, though physically active (because of my environment I will explain) 40 year old.

I agree with a lot of what was said here...with the exception I don't agree with "fad diets" but common sense nutrition.

The crux of our problem is the totality of our modern lifestyle. Modern work, modern (processed, hormone added,white sugar, transfat genetically modified) industrial food, modern transport. Before coming to Europe, I drove everywhere, now I bike or use public transport (which still requires more walking than the car) and feel better for it. However, as I am a gourmand, I have not benefited like I could as I too often buy little snacks like pain au chocolate or now ice cream. So I am forcing myself to change and will look at a dance course or membership in a gym to do more exercise. I realise I need to get in shape more after a camping trip to the Jura mountains by bike a month ago. The return was great but boy did I feel it...plus the heatwave did not help. Amount of food is also important.

Interesting that Fritz says food in China is not healthy...well doesn't fit the image we have here, and you are not the first person to say that. In Asia, I have the impression you can eat properly in Japan as the traditional diet is quite healthy there. (Oh I drink much less coffee now mostly green or regular tea).

Let me give another example, they say in Europe some of the lowest rates of heart disease is in Crete. It's a total lifestyle thing, for most people, Greek food is gyros, moussaka, and bakalava, and somehow olive oil can balance that out. There (I'm talking the villiage residents, fishers and farmers) they do eat that stuff, but in smaller quantities. They eat a lot of fish and fresh vegetables, work outside a lot, eat the big meal at midday (where they will have some moussaka or fish with salad) and when people there eat bakalava they eat a piece, maybe two with a greek coffee. Not 4 pieces a day. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Sadly we have lost a lot of this lifestyle, so we have to compensate in other directions.

wintergoose
08-22-2006, 03:36 AM
There realy is only one way to reduce weight.
You have to use more energy than you put inn.
You also have to exercize your body, dont sit tight.
To do this you need a strong will and a big motivation.
And here is the problem. We are all trying to awoyd that reason, we want to reduse weight without doing to much work, sweating.

MEGILE
08-22-2006, 04:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:


Age is a major factor in gaining muscle. When I was in my early 20's, I was a flag pole. No matter how much I worked out, I just could gain weight.

I lifted a few years ago and made great gains. I'm 40 now.

But you mentioned doing a lot of reps in the gym. Don't "over rep". If you want to gain mass and bulk, then use lower reps and heavier weights.

The idea is to rip the muscles at the microscopic scale. I liked doing "supersets" at the end of my workout.

If I had worked on my back and was finished my routine, I'd then do one set of every exercise I had done. This is best with a partner.

Example: lateral pulldowns

Since 220 was my max in my set, I'd start with 180 for my superset. I'd do 20 reps and as soon as I reached 20, my partner would change the weight pin from 180 to 160. Then 20 reps again. Then 160 to 140, 20 reps. I would do this until I was at the last bit of weight. Believe me when I say, you'll feel it the next few days.

Be sure to get lots of sleep. Muscles only grow during sleep.

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

hehe I'm 20 years old, so I guess you were like me...

I follow arnold's routine of increasing across the set..

so barbell curls I'll do 15, 10, 8, 6, 4 reps on each set. It really makes sure that you warm up the muscles and get a full workout...

my favourite workout is probably crunches... I enjoy them and they come naturally to me.. maybe because I was so skinny http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

The only major workout I don't do at the moment are squats... I really need to build them into ym routine, but during the summer my college buddies have gone home, so I don't have a gym partner. And I don't want to rip a muscle doing something stupid http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

ImpStarDuece
08-22-2006, 07:31 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ytareh:
Whats CAPOEIRA ImpStarDeuce?And Al speaks the truth...If you dont buy it you cant eat it!!!(the biggest battle is in the supermarket/foodstore) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Capoeira is a Brazilian martial art that combines dance, music and acrobatics with lots of spins, kicks, leaps and ground moves. It looks very impressive, but is easier than most people think and requires nothing more than a moderate level of fitness and an open mind.

My groups website is at: Capoeiracre (http://www.capoeiracre.com). Its a style that places a little more emphasis on flips and cartwheels than most.

I picked it up while living in Japan with a mate who had lived in Brazil for 5 or 6 years and had studied it there. He was jaw droppingly good, and my ultimate goal is to get up to his standard.

XyZspineZyX
08-22-2006, 07:56 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Hi Dasriech,

what's your inspiration to get started?

I found that watching an action movie, where the star was in tiptop shape or watching sports gets me inpired.

Fritz
What inspired me, interesting question.
I was never good at sport at school, & suffered from low self esteem. But around 16-17 I found after exercise I felt good, must have been the endomorphins. I was raised to work by my parents, english migrants who came to Australia with nothing, so I discovered martial arts Taekwondo, a Korean system. With martial arts you compete against yourself & that was a beginning of a journey that will continue until I die. What inspires me "seeking the ultimate truth" through the martial way. I read a book written about a man called Mas Oyama & his style of Karate Kyokshinkai. What this man achieved stunned me. You can do anything you want to all you have to do is try.
Through martial arts my athletic ability has improved 10 fold.
It is now part of me
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Fritz </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Pirschjaeger
08-22-2006, 10:02 AM
Hi Joe,

really, in all my travels, I have never seen worse food than Chinese food as far as nutrition goes. Keep in mind, I'm am in the north East (Beijing) so food will be different in other places.

Funny thing is, Chinese believe their food is really healthy. Their reasoning is that they are thinner. Besides the obvious genetic reasons, Chinese are much thinner due to malnutrition. Not in the sense of starvation, but in quality. To make matters worse, they have really bad cooking habits. I've never seen so much oil in any other foods as what you'll find in Chinese.

BTW, Chinese food is nothing like the Chinese food you see in the western nations.

Fritz

sukebeboy
08-22-2006, 06:12 PM
Japan is pretty bad too. They've adopted the fast food mentality and, hard as it is to believe, their food is actually less healthy than fast food in the west. Almost everything is breaded, deep fried in oil and then covered in mayonaise.

Fruits and veggies are ridiculously expensive. I live in one of the major agricultural areas of Japan, specialising in fruits yet I pay about $5 USD for 2 peaches, $1 for one cucumber, and $1.50 for one apple, all of which are grown right here.

There is also no real variety in selection. YOu have 15-20 companies competing in say, sports drinks or bread and they all use the same recipe. I can chose from a wide variety of sports drinks brands, but they're all going to have the same weak grapefruit flavour, and the same caloric and salt content. Same goes for bread (don't really eat bread, but it's a prominent example). 30 different bread companies and they all produce the same crappy over processed white bread with six slices per package and no crusts.

Pirschjaeger
08-22-2006, 09:07 PM
In the area I hangout in when in Germany, the food is very healthy and cheap. It's so easy to keep a delicious fat-free diet at a very low cost. Many Germans are into healthy eating and a healthy life-style.

Why am I back in China? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Fritz

joeap
08-23-2006, 02:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by sukebeboy:
Japan is pretty bad too. They've adopted the fast food mentality and, hard as it is to believe, their food is actually less healthy than fast food in the west. Almost everything is breaded, deep fried in oil and then covered in mayonaise.

Fruits and veggies are ridiculously expensive. I live in one of the major agricultural areas of Japan, specialising in fruits yet I pay about $5 USD for 2 peaches, $1 for one cucumber, and $1.50 for one apple, all of which are grown right here.

There is also no real variety in selection. YOu have 15-20 companies competing in say, sports drinks or bread and they all use the same recipe. I can chose from a wide variety of sports drinks brands, but they're all going to have the same weak grapefruit flavour, and the same caloric and salt content. Same goes for bread (don't really eat bread, but it's a prominent example). 30 different bread companies and they all produce the same crappy over processed white bread with six slices per package and no crusts. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Now that is a surprise, must be a change from their traditions then because traditional Japanese food is healthy. I know ethnic food is different overseas but I did go for lunch at a Japanese place yesterday. Cucumber and seaweed salad, and chiken teryaki (not deep fried) which is real Japanese food (like sushi or soba noodles other healthy choices). I hope you eat mor rice sukebeboy

Guy I say again, for many cases the problem is globalisation and industrial food, fast food, convenience food and the like. Plus the amounts of course.

It is difficult for foreigners to adjust in any case, plus we can always get the wrong idea.
Fritz don't misunderstand me, but if I got my idea of German food from my visit to Oktoberfest with the huge pretzels, hunks of pork roast, variuos wurst and other tasty junk well, nothing to do with what you describe (plus Barvarians are a bit odd to other Germans http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif )

Go traditional!!! Google "slow food" and see what you get. Buy local when possible, fresh not processed.

LStarosta
08-23-2006, 05:38 AM
I'm joining.

I gained 5 lbs on my trip to Europe.

F*cking beer.

Anyway, if you're an absolute idiot, try running. The reason I say that is that your chance of injury is 100% if you're a n00b, especially an overweight one. But if you can be smart, and have a runner help you figure things out such as what type of shoes you require, how and what you should stretch, what mistakes you should avoid etc etc, then you can really lose a very large amount of weight.

Contrary to what other runners may say about being able to eat anything as a runner, however, you need to change your eating habits as well. Get in the habit of eating a lot of GREENS and a lot of FIBER to drastically reduce your calorie intake while feeling full. Eliminate all unnecessary items such as thick, fatty dressings, sauces etc etc. from your every-day meals. If you are forced to eat at a fast food joint, you will be surprised that ordering a chicken sandwich with no sauce will save you from consuming 100 calories. It may taste like ****, but spartan-eating has its rewards. Also, I am not saying that you should go anorexic, but as a runner, you should focus more on carbohydrates for running fuel and carbohydrates+protein for post-exercise muscle tissue recovery, all in moderate quantities, while focusing on eliminating fat in food. If you try to eat fat-free, then you will most likely eliminate all the bad fats you find in processed foods while still allowing yourself necessary fats such as those found in fish and in lean meats.

The biggest piece of advice I can give you, however, is to set aside one day of the week where you can enjoy your favorite foods such as pizza, burgers, chips (preferably not all of them in one day) all in moderation. If you cut all those foods out, then you'll just be daydreaming about them and you'll probably just lose to temptation and start eating them on a daily basis all over again.

Weight loss is really almost an entirely mental process, because once you decide to embrace healthy habits, then the physical parts such as exercise and actually eating healthful food follow on their own.

Running is very difficult, mentally speaking, because it does not feel good when you are in the process of running. It feels horrible because your body is not used to the increased heart rate, muscle load, muscle fatigue, and skeletal fatigue that you put upon it. But after you're done it feels like you're on top of the world! That is what we call a runner's high. And you just got to face it, that the only way you're really going to lose weight is if you adjust your diet and conduct cardiovascular exercise, NOT weight lifting. Running tasks your cardiovascular system like virtually nothing else, so you will be shedding pounds in no time.

And once you lose the weight, running is a great way to stay in shape. As long as you run, you can loosen up on your eating habits, and runners prode themselves on being able to eat anything and not gain a pound (except for me, apparently). Of course, I don't recommend going on a binge, but allow yourself a little more of your favorite foods in moderation to keep yourself from collapsing mentally and binging on them.

Anyway, if you you are interested in running, let me know, and I'll try and tell you everything I learned the hard way back when I was a n00b grasshopper.

panther3485
08-23-2006, 07:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:

"Anyway, if you're an absolute idiot, try running. The reason I say that is that your chance of injury is 100% if you're a n00b, especially an overweight one. But if you can be smart, and have a runner help you figure things out such as what type of shoes you require, how and what you should stretch, what mistakes you should avoid etc etc, then you can really lose a very large amount of weight.

Contrary to what other runners may say about being able to eat anything as a runner, however, you need to change your eating habits as well. Get in the habit of eating a lot of GREENS and a lot of FIBER to drastically reduce your calorie intake while feeling full. Eliminate all unnecessary items such as thick, fatty dressings, sauces etc etc. from your every-day meals. If you are forced to eat at a fast food joint, you will be surprised that ordering a chicken sandwich with no sauce will save you from consuming 100 calories. It may taste like ****, but spartan-eating has its rewards. Also, I am not saying that you should go anorexic, but as a runner, you should focus more on carbohydrates for running fuel and carbohydrates+protein for post-exercise muscle tissue recovery, all in moderate quantities, while focusing on eliminating fat in food. If you try to eat fat-free, then you will most likely eliminate all the bad fats you find in processed foods while still allowing yourself necessary fats such as those found in fish and in lean meats.

Weight loss is really almost an entirely mental process, because once you decide to embrace healthy habits, then the physical parts such as exercise and actually eating healthful food follow on their own.

Running is very difficult, mentally speaking, because it does not feel good when you are in the process of running. It feels horrible because your body is not used to the increased heart rate, muscle load, muscle fatigue, and skeletal fatigue that you put upon it. But after you're done it feels like you're on top of the world! That is what we call a runner's high. And you just got to face it, that the only way you're really going to lose weight is if you adjust your diet and conduct cardiovascular exercise, NOT weight lifting. Running tasks your cardiovascular system like virtually nothing else, so you will be shedding pounds in no time.

And once you lose the weight, running is a great way to stay in shape. As long as you run, you can loosen up on your eating habits, and runners prode themselves on being able to eat anything and not gain a pound (except for me, apparently). Of course, I don't recommend going on a binge, but allow yourself a little more of your favorite foods in moderation to keep yourself from collapsing mentally and binging on them.

Anyway, if you you are interested in running, let me know, and I'll try and tell you everything I learned the hard way back when I was a n00b grasshopper." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Yep, great exercise if you go about it the right way - I used to run a lot.

Unfortunately, running is now out of the question for me as it's physically impossible for me to run properly, due to my knee injury. If I try to run, my knee just collapses and I go down like a bag of $hit - not to mention the fact that it hurts, too.

You should see me trying to 'run' for the bus if I'm a bit late for work in the morning. It's kind of a loping, lurching, swaying, half-trotting gait that must be very comical to watch! Once, the bus driver took pity on me and waited a few extra seconds (unlike most of his mates!)

So, for me it's walking (and I can maintain a fairly brisk pace, even with my limp), steady cycling (with the seat as high as possible to reduce load on the knee joint) and swimming.


Best regards, http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
panther3485

sukebeboy
08-23-2006, 08:13 AM
Yup, running is out for me as well ever since the rugby injury. No loss. Always hated running. I blame the army and a PE teacher that used to make us run through the dump in high school.

Anyway, for people just starting out, I recommend run/walking. Your first time out, walk for 5 minutes, then run a minute, walk a minute, run a minute and repeat this for 10 minutes. When you're done, walk another 5 and head home. Do this for a week. The next week, do the same, but run 90 seconds and walk a minute. The week after, alternate running for a minute and walking for a minute, but keep it up for 15 or 20 minutes. Every week, add 30 seconds to the running time and within 6 weeks, I guarantee you'll be able to jog non stop for at least 30 minutes and it's all gravy from there.

Pirschjaeger
08-23-2006, 09:39 AM
Hi Joeap,

what you see in the restaurants in Germany is not exactly healthy food. What I was referring to was what you can buy in the supermarkets. With a little knowledge of nutrition you can easily live on 100 euros a month. I know this cause I was doing it. During my time in Germany I ate better than I ever ate in my life. But that has a lot to do with my preferences.

BTW, the Japanese foods you mentioned are not the foods they eat at home. I am intouch with a lot of Japanese these days and I've questioned them on their food. Sushi is too expensive and more for celebrations. From my understanding, fastfood in Japan is replacing traditional Japanese foods.

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
08-23-2006, 09:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:
I'm joining.

I gained 5 lbs on my trip to Europe.

F*cking beer. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Careful, thems is fightin words. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:

Anyway, if you're an absolute idiot, try running. The reason I say that is that your chance of injury is 100% if you're a n00b, especially an overweight one. But if you can be smart, and have a runner help you figure things out such as what type of shoes you require, how and what you should stretch, what mistakes you should avoid etc etc, then you can really lose a very large amount of weight.

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Good point. Earlier this year I started running. I was running up to 10k a day after starting less than a month before. I thought it would be great since the area is very hilly. One night I was running and after about 5k I got a pain in my foot. I thought to myself "no pain, no gain" and continued running another 7k, in the rain.

The next day I woke up in pain and my foot was swollen. I spent the next two weeks hopping from point A to B. Stupid, stupid, stupid.

Running is a great way to burn fat and exercise the cardio, but it's also a great way to injure yourself.

Bicycling is better and much more interesting.

Fritz

russ.nl
08-23-2006, 09:54 AM
Hi my name is Valken and I'm a ... oh wait wrong group.

Just eat normal. Till you have enough, not till you're full or stuffed.

That's all the advise I can give.

Pirschjaeger
08-23-2006, 09:56 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by sukebeboy:
Yup, running is out for me as well ever since the rugby injury. No loss. Always hated running. I blame the army and a PE teacher that used to make us run through the dump in high school.

Anyway, for people just starting out, I recommend run/walking. Your first time out, walk for 5 minutes, then run a minute, walk a minute, run a minute and repeat this for 10 minutes. When you're done, walk another 5 and head home. Do this for a week. The next week, do the same, but run 90 seconds and walk a minute. The week after, alternate running for a minute and walking for a minute, but keep it up for 15 or 20 minutes. Every week, add 30 seconds to the running time and within 6 weeks, I guarantee you'll be able to jog non stop for at least 30 minutes and it's all gravy from there. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is a good way. Moderation. Build it up slowly.

What many don't realize is that although the muscles adapt and get into shape quickly, the tendants and ligaments require much more time. There's also no warning of ligament of tendant fatige. Once you feel it, it's already too late.

For those who are not sure, the tendents and ligaments are what attaches your muscles to your bones. They don't heal easily. After a long time of not exercising, the become brittle and damage very easily. Start slow and build up slow. Don't judge your progress by the feeling in your muscles.

"No pain, no gain" is total BS.

"No pain, no gain" = "No brain, got pain".

Fritz

LStarosta
08-23-2006, 10:52 AM
I like cycling as well, but it takes me way too long to get a high quality distance workout on a bike. Doing speedwork in the form of timed sprints on a bicycle is a killer workout, however http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

Also I think you upped your mileage WAY too fast. Running 10k every day after just starting running a month ago is a surefire way to get injured. Your muscular and skeletal fitness lags behind your cardiovascular fitness. What you feel you can do fatigue-wise is often times much more than your muscles, tendons and bones can handle. That's probably why you got injured right away. You need to ease into running. If you are cardiovascularly fit, that means holding yourself back. A rule of thumb is to up your weekly mileage by no more than 10% every week up to a point which cooincides with your fitness goals. If something hurts, stop RIGHT AWAY. Ice it 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off 3 times a day and try again tomorrow. If it hurts, take more time off and cross train (swim, cycle, row, elliptic machine etc).

Injury prevention also includes the weight room. Newbie runners get what is called "shin splints" which are micro-tears in the muscle tissue which cause extreme pain in the medial (inside) part of your shin. Try to find a tibia machine to strengthen the muscles around your shin. Alternately if your gym doesn't have a tibia machine, JG7_Rall suggested that you slip your feet under a couch or other heavy furniture and attempt to raise it with your feet. Shin splints happen more often to people with flat feet and people who overpronate (people whose foot rolls inward too much when they run). These people often require motion control/stability shoes with optional arch support inserts. These shoes/arch supports may make your feet hurt for a week or two but your foot will get used to them. If, however, you get excessive blistering on your arch, then you have too much arch support and you need a step down. I recommend going to a dedicated running store where a runner will be able to examine your gait and tell you what type of shoes will fit you best. Many of these sotres will typically let you try a pair of shoes or orthotics for 30 days with the option of either an exchange or a refund.

Also, in the weight room, you should work on your core muscles. These muscles support your entire body and ultimately determine how efficient of a form you can maintain during a run. People with weak abdominal and pectoral muscles tend to hunch over when they run, which not only is kinetically inefficient, but being hunched over lessens the extent to which your diaphragm can inflate, reducing your respitory and cardiovascular efficiency as well.

You should also work on toning your arm muscles. Just because you have big arms and you can bench a lot doesn't mean your arms are in good shape. The leaner your arms are, the more efficiently you can run. That's because you need to make an honest and conscious effort to thrust your arms back and forth as you run to best conserve your momentum. The less fat you have on your arm, the less weight your arms have to move as you swing your arms, which means you use less effort to pump your arms. Do core-exercises such as crunches and push ups every day, and do arm and leg work every other day if possible. Remember, to tone do low weights and high reps (put on enough weight so that you can do no more than 8-12 reps otherwise you're wasting time).

Proper form means running in the most relaxed way possible, and that's different for everyone, but every effective form shares certain common attributes. One is keeping your back straight and chest forward. Another is keeping your hands, jaws, and other muscles relaxed. Keep your shoulders low and start with your arms low, and think of them as swinging pendulums. Then move your hands up (shorten the string on the pendulum) only to the point where your arm swing comfortably matches your stride. Do not keep your arms too high, and don't let them cross your chest when you run. Your arms should swing straight forward and back. Also keep your head up and chin down and don't let your head droop down.

When you're actually running, make sure your foot strikes the ground under your center of gravity. This allows for a quicker and lighter turnover (your RPM, if you will) which equates to less stress on your legs, faster running speed, and better running efficiency which allows you to run farther. This is also EXTREMELY important for people who run in hilly areas. If you run down-hill and let your foot strike in front of you, you are slowing yourself down. And since slowing yourself on a downhill requires the absorption of energy, guess where all of it is going... Yes, right into your aching knees, quadriceps and hips which at best causes discomfort and at worst causes injuries. When running downhill, try to make your legs work like a wheel, and always let them impact the ground right under your body. To run faster on a down-hill, lean forward. To slow down, lean back. When climbing a hill, lean forward a bit and shorten your stride and pump your arms back and forth more forcefully.

Also, wherever possible, run on grass or gravel as it is softer and absorbs shock better than pavement. If you must run on pavement, run on asphalt rather than concrete. Concrete is 6 times harder and is a great source of injuries. Running on softer ground will help prevent or lessen many common n00bie injuries such as shin splints.

In general, work on increasing your turnover by taking many shorter strides and then start increasing your stride length without sacrificing your turnover rate.

If you start off easy, you can really get into running as a long-term thing. I strongly suggest racing. You can be competetive with others if you wish, but foot races are generally very social gatherings where runners can get together and share tips, techniques, etc etc. In racing, anyway, your biggest opponent is your own mind. I run races primarily to beat my own personal records, and that brings me enough satisfaction on its own. Of course, beating someone you really wanted to beat is quite rewarding as well. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

All this injury prevention advice from a guy who won a gold medal in High School basically for having a **** ton of injuries. "Injured But Essential" I believe it was called. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Anyone who was thinking about trying running has my blessings. Running is not only a sport, it's a great lifestyle.

TacticalYak3
08-23-2006, 11:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AlGroover:
Eat less, exercise more. Energy in, energy out. The truth is brutal. What seems to have changed in recent years is most folks perception of normal portion size. As a quick check ask lean people you know and fat people you know, what is their weekly bill for groceries. I was shocked. Fat people spend twice as much on food as their lean counterparts. This takes no account of type or quality of food or calorie content nor anything to do with exercise. Just a simple observation. if you don't buy it, you don't eat it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Odd as I find it much more expensive to buy quality foods such as fresh vegetables, lean cuts of meat and fish.

Interesting thread. Been through most exercise regimes. Enjoyed abbreviated weight training when I was a younger man. Approaching my 40s and now seeing the benefit of more cardio to stay healthy. Let's face it sitting in front of a PC is a lot of fun, but must be balanced with healthy pursuits.

Pirschjaeger
08-24-2006, 06:24 AM
Hi guyz,

got a heads-up in PT today:

"Hi Fritz!

Good thread, mate.

Just a quick word on tendons and ligaments:

Tendons join muscle to bone (as you stated already).

Ligaments join bone to bone.

I was a field medic in the armed forces (among other things).


Best regards,
panther3485"

Thx Panther. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Fritz

joeap
08-24-2006, 07:12 AM
Let's not forget what we drink. Fluid intake is important. Beer and coffee are two drinks to be taken in moderation...but still have positive effects (especially beer). Water is still the best, or is it tea? See this surprising article from the Beeb.

Tea: better than water (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/5281046.stm?ls)

Really surprised it does not dehydrate you.

sukebeboy
08-24-2006, 09:00 AM
Japanese drink a lot of tea and their teeth look like rabbit pellets. I'll stick with water and hornet spit.

joeap
08-24-2006, 09:10 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by sukebeboy:
Japanese drink a lot of tea and their teeth look like rabbit pellets. I'll stick with water and hornet spit. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Something tells me you don't like being there? Anyway I drink tea (green and brown) amd my teeth are fine. Smoking is worse.

sukebeboy
08-24-2006, 11:24 AM
It's OK but 9 years on and off is enough. I had wanted to move to Thailand 2 years ago but ended up getting mangled in the Tsunami the first time I went for interviews and caught up in a governmental crisis which prevented me from getting a visa when I went in March of this year. Oh well, maybe next March when my contract is up.

Watch that green tea. It does nasty things to your teeth. Well, it does to the Japanese at any rate. Koreans must have better dentists.

fordfan25
08-24-2006, 01:22 PM
wanna lose LB's i gots one word for all you fatties. CRACK!! its the one true fat burner http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif . but seriousely i can get you a good deal http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif J/K.

yea at 6ft 235Lb im needing to drop some pounds. of course 20 of those pounds i dont want to lose http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

woofiedog
08-24-2006, 02:56 PM
Anyone up for a few Slices of... this here Shaved Steak, Mushroom and Onion Pizza with Extra Sauce.

I'll have a refill on the Bourbon & Water and could Yah Please pass another slice this way. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

JFA--
08-24-2006, 04:31 PM
I think ImpStarDuece hit the point: Find something you really like. It could be running, weight lifting, swimming, walking. Most important thing is: whatever you do you have to enjoy it.

I like to box (basic training & spar). Fenching is nice occasionally. What i don´t like is running (boring). But i found out that orienteering is fun instead! I don´t have any goals -im just having fun and meeting different people http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

If you want to loose fat, eat wisely and exercise http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif There´s no other way.

Pirschjaeger
08-26-2006, 06:26 PM
Here's an interesting Q&A site:

http://www.tomvenuto.com/asktom/ask_tom.shtml

Fritz

LStarosta
08-26-2006, 07:16 PM
http://www.tomvenuto.com/asktom/images/tom_venuto_headshot1.jpg

I dunno, that kind of body grosses me out.

Anyhoo, I lift mainly to tone and to increase upper body stamina, so I don't know if this applies to someone who is trying to build up a lot of muscle, but I tend to get better results if I start my resistance training within 10 minutes of completing an aerobic workout. Maybe it's just coincidence, but I think I'll stick to it.

HotelBushranger
08-28-2006, 07:49 AM
Hey guys, just found this thread!

A few years ago, bout 2003/2004 I was pretty fat for my BMI. So, during January, every day, I went to the pool and swam for just 1 hour. Every day for January, then February, and a bit of March. By the end of it, I had dropped about 10 kg and had the best set of abs I've ever had http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

But now in 2006, I'm not in my best of physics forms. So I started running about a month ago, and its great! Before that, I used to cycle, but I have Patella Femoral Syndrome, which means I have piss-weak quads. This makes cycling and just general pressure on the knees very painful (once I had ridden out a few km's before my knees conked out - very painful hobble home http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif). Now, we and my mate are going to the gym, and it's great fun! 10 mins on the treadmill, 10 on the bike, half on hour on weight machines and more on general fitness. I am particularly into building up leg muscles as opposed to upper body/arm, I like having good legs (so I can run away http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif) therefore most of the weight machines are taylored to that. The downside to that is, again thanks to the PFS, my knees absolutely cain whenever I use machines that put pressure on the knees (oh the irony!).

Hopefully I will be in great form soon http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif And again, the logic is diet (never eat take away) and exercise (^). These Hollywood weight loss 'diet's gives me the sh!ts.

samsteveneh
06-06-2018, 11:57 AM
Losing weight can be considered as one of the hard-hitting challenges that I have ever endeavored in my life. Here are my tips if you are a really motivated beginner trying to lose those extra pounds that youve treasured all your life.
If you want to lose weight and keep it off, you know that exercise should be an essential part of your routine. A regular fitness routine in order to have a wide-range of positive health effects, such as a lower risk of cancer and stroke, better cardiovascular health, stronger muscles, and slowing of bone density loss associated with age. Paleo diet and exercising goes hand in hand. Exercising regularly while following a strict Paleo diet comprised only of foods that can be hunted and gathered can do wonders.
The paleo diet has become one of the most popular eating approaches out there, so you wont have trouble finding a bounty of paleo-friendly recipes online and on bookshelves (virtual or not!).
Here is a link from all the Google search results that I found the most useful: https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/the-paleo-diet.aspx