PDA

View Full Version : U-66 Severly crippled continues its trip back home



William66th
02-01-2006, 05:58 PM
Ok I decided to keep writing about the experience of the game since so many people read it. This is a continuation of the past two post. Hope you enjoy, U-66 is still not in friendly waters at this time. Still looking for help. S.o.s.

Continued on from parts 1, 2 found below please read 1 and 2 first and enjoy

Part 1: U-66 Under Attack (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/4451089304)
Part 2 : U-66 Limps Back home (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/2311001404)
------------------------------------------------
It has been almost 4 days since the U-66 and her faithfull crew brushed with disaster. Now down to her last drop of fuel and not to mention food the crew struggle on as the even the very best now fear for death.

It was another slow night. The sun had set and the watch crew was changing shifts I sat in my bunk with my head pressed into my hands wondering what I could have done differently to avoid this. Had I played it safe we wouldn't be in this mess in the first place. I began to place the blame on myself. As captain It was my respocibility to make sure ship and her crew
were safe. I had failed this time. I wondered what would happen to me if we did make it back to base. At the accademy we had always been tought to be aggressive, but maybe I pushed it. My mind again drifted back to our sendoff as family and friends had gathered to say goodbye and goodluck. The thought of those that perished were still clear in my head and I
remember watching them hug there wife and kids. Now to know that I would have to tell them in person when or if we got back that their loved one would never be home again. It was just to much to handle. I had written the letters but in them I couldn't think of anything to scratch the surface of their sacrafice. The least I could do was go tell and comfort them in person.

I began to feel sick and I could not tell if it was from the thoughts brewing in my head or the lack of food and water. It didn't matter there was no time to pay attention to my feelings I was still in command and Damn it I would give it everything and then some to get this ship and her crew home.

I stood up and walked down the wet path into the command room and asked for a report on fuel. The officer looked at me with a grim face and told me that at present speed we would have about 20 hours before we were "dead" in the water. This was just one more thing to heave on my chest. Atleast if we would have sank it would have been quick and maybe even painless, I began to think to myself. But now my crew and I are starving to death slowly.

I walked back into the aft crew berthing area, It still smelled like death but i guess you get used to it after awhile. It didn't seem as strong. In the compartment I watched as my men looked at me with faces I had never seen before. They new now exaclty how bad our situation was. I would be willing to bet they would have liked to drown as well. Hell maybe those men of the earlier funeral services had it easy.

In the middle of one of the bunks was a bucket of fruit, some of the men went on and tried to peal the moldy layers of skin off to eat what little food we had left. Food was just one of the problems but being surrounded by water with no way of drinking it was another. In desperation some of the crew tried to drink the sea water but it only made things worse. We had rationed all our water and now it was gone. The only comfort came at night when the sea was calm and the air was cool.

I walked further back into the engine department where the mechanics worked to keep our one engine running. Shortly after nightfall the other diesel had burned up from lack of oil. I went did an about face, after saluting the men that were keeping our only chance or survival alive, and walked back towards the command room. Along the way I stopped by our radio operator in hopes of hearing some good news for a change. I ask him if he had heard any reports of German ship in the area. He didn't answer, I repeated the question but still no answer. I walked and stood in front of him and knelt down, slowly I
waved my hand in front of his face and watched his eyes there was no response. I called for the medic to get him and bring him into the forward berthing area. The medic then told me that this man was severly dehydrated and that his mind was shutting down. Without some water he would not make it. I noticed that alot of my crew was acting dilusional and the medic
assured me that it would only get worse as time went by.

I pointed to a man resting his head on a rusty pipe and told him to take the radio operators station. He relunctantly did as he was ordered and sat in the chair. "You let me know if you here anything from friendly ships" I yelled to him and then added "Its our only hope of survival"

The submarine continued to chug along the waves again it was nice weather but honestly at this point I would give my left arm for some rain atleast then we would have some fresh water. That was not the case instead the sun beat down in all of it glory onto our little boat. It was so bright at times that the reflection off the water was blinding the watchmen. I had reduced the watchcrew to only two men because of the severe dehydration of my crew. I myself was also starting to feel the effects of lack of food and water. There were times where I would simply stand there until a member of my crew tapped me on the shoulder to ask if I was ok. Then I would wake from my daze and resume my duties. For the life of me I never knew what I was dreaming about.

As the hours slowly moved on there was nothing on the submarine to do. The only thing that could be heard was the diesel engine struggling along, the waves outside lapping at the side of the U-66, and the gramaphone. The gramaphone by now was honestly started to irritate me, there are only so many time that you can listen to the words "It's a long way to tippirary"
but it did seem to keep the crews hopes up. I gathered my strength and walked to the foward berthing compartment. Now every bed in the area was filled with men to weak to carry out dutties. Next to many was a bucket filled with there past stomach contents of the day. I couldn't stand the smell and had to return to the command room. There was still no signal or radio message from the fleet. At that time I heard a loud explosion and it rocked the U-66. Black smoke billowed out of the engine campartment were the diesel engine was and the fire team sprang into action. As tired as my men were they still did there job. The fire was extinquished very quickly but the diesel engine was no longer running. I walked into the engine room and instantly my eyes teared from the strong smoke. I could bearly see the men in front of me staring at the engine now
covered in black oil.

'What happened?" I asked the officer in charge.
"We lost her, I think its from the lack of oil, I dont know if i can fix it sir." he replied.

I told him to do everything possible to get the engine running again, to take who ever he needed to help him. Without and engine we had better just shoot ourselves and get it over with. Still a thought in the back of my head at the time.

For atleast 8 hours the mechanics and crew made the engine room their home as they took parts from the the damaged starboard engine and moved the parts over to the port. It was a scene that would have made the very best machinest back at base quiver with fear of losing there job. My men were amazing they fought off the exhustion and worked in conditions that made a slave looked blessed. Some of the men cut and bleeding from the earlier attack worked in oil soaked clothes moving parts from one engine to the other. Slowly you watched as one engine began to look more like a pile of scrap metal then a powerfull diesel engine. The other engine started to take shape. They also came up with a way using some old pipe from the exhaust manifold to transfer much needed oil back into the circulation. It was very clever what they had come up with. As the sun started to go down the U-66 got very dark and we had to break out some lights to keep the engine comparment lit enough to see. I also chipped in to help and i felt like one of the crew at this time I forgot what rank I was and listened to the mechanical knowledge being yelled out around me. After what seemed like an eternity we were ready to give the repairs a try.

I gave the command to start the port diesel, as I silently prayed that it would work. The engine slowly turned over and I started to think that maybe the battery by now was dead. Then it turned a little faster but would not fire.

"Keep trying, without the engine we are dead!" I exclaimed to the officer as he again tried to fire up the diesel engine.

This time though the praying payed off. The engine started to turn faster and rev higher. I watched as a huge puff off dark black smoke came from the engine. Then as if the engine were returning from the dead she fired up. The lights throughout the U-66 slowly began to brighten. My mechanics had done it, they had saved our *** for now.

"When we get back to base I'm buying you guys all the drinks you can handle, now ahead standard!" I ordered as the U-66 slowly started moving through the water again. The engine was making some noises I had never heard a diesel make before but it was running, that all I cared about at this time. The U-66 and her crew made it past yet another trial.

I breathed a sigh of relief eventhough I knew our ordeal was far from over. My crew still needed water and food despreatly and even with our engine we only had enough fuel to last another 5 hours.

The radio had been silent, there was no updates or reports of any kind. This was odd but not too uncommon. I knew that everytime we transmitted our coded S.O.S. message we made it easier for the enemy to find us. This, however was a chance we had to take. I climbed the ladder into the conning tower and onto the bridge. The bridge crew was famished and barely able to stand but they were doing there best. I told the men to go down and get some rest the next crew was on the way. The followed me back into the belly of the U-66 and headed for the aft berthing compartment. The next watch crew made its way up the ladder and disappeared from sight as they stepped out onto the bridge.

I went back to my quarters and layed down in bed looking at the pictures of my own family wondering i I would ever see them again. Trying to find out why I took this job, this career. I was young and indestructable or so I thought. For now i was seeing that I was wrong. Maybe Dead wrong this time. I felt my chest and looked at my rank and metals. None of this could save me now. My uniform looked just like the men I served with. It was covered in dirt, oil, and stale blood. I sat up and picked up my journal to write some letters to home. I realy was scared at this point that I would never make it. Death
would be a pleseant surprise at this time though as my stomach growled for food. I leaned forward and threw up all over the
floor. The taste was horrible and I fought the gag reflexes. It wasn't a huge mess because there was no food for my stomach to get rid of. It was however a horrible feeling and it kept comming and going all day.

I put that thought out of my head and wiped my mouth off with the cleanest dirty towl I could find and began to write to my family. I didn't get but a sentence into the journal when to my horror.

"Aircraft spotted!" came down through the pipes used to transmit messages to the command room and then was repeated. I nearly hit my head as I jumped out of my bed and ran to the command room. I tried to reassure myself by saying that it was a german plane and would be here to help us but with our luck....

I stopped in the middle of my thought and yelled out.

"All crew general quarters, general quarters!"
"Man the flack guns, I repeat man the flack guns"
"All crews to assigned areas"

I sure as hell hope our luck has changed I thought to myself as my crew rushed around securing doors and climbing up the ladders onto the pitching deck of the U-66.
------------------------------------------------

Hope you enjoyed, currently engaged in combat in a crippled U-boat send air defence to my possition, we can not hold out much longer
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

William
Captain
U-66

William66th
02-01-2006, 05:58 PM
Ok I decided to keep writing about the experience of the game since so many people read it. This is a continuation of the past two post. Hope you enjoy, U-66 is still not in friendly waters at this time. Still looking for help. S.o.s.

Continued on from parts 1, 2 found below please read 1 and 2 first and enjoy

Part 1: U-66 Under Attack (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/4451089304)
Part 2 : U-66 Limps Back home (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/2311001404)
------------------------------------------------
It has been almost 4 days since the U-66 and her faithfull crew brushed with disaster. Now down to her last drop of fuel and not to mention food the crew struggle on as the even the very best now fear for death.

It was another slow night. The sun had set and the watch crew was changing shifts I sat in my bunk with my head pressed into my hands wondering what I could have done differently to avoid this. Had I played it safe we wouldn't be in this mess in the first place. I began to place the blame on myself. As captain It was my respocibility to make sure ship and her crew
were safe. I had failed this time. I wondered what would happen to me if we did make it back to base. At the accademy we had always been tought to be aggressive, but maybe I pushed it. My mind again drifted back to our sendoff as family and friends had gathered to say goodbye and goodluck. The thought of those that perished were still clear in my head and I
remember watching them hug there wife and kids. Now to know that I would have to tell them in person when or if we got back that their loved one would never be home again. It was just to much to handle. I had written the letters but in them I couldn't think of anything to scratch the surface of their sacrafice. The least I could do was go tell and comfort them in person.

I began to feel sick and I could not tell if it was from the thoughts brewing in my head or the lack of food and water. It didn't matter there was no time to pay attention to my feelings I was still in command and Damn it I would give it everything and then some to get this ship and her crew home.

I stood up and walked down the wet path into the command room and asked for a report on fuel. The officer looked at me with a grim face and told me that at present speed we would have about 20 hours before we were "dead" in the water. This was just one more thing to heave on my chest. Atleast if we would have sank it would have been quick and maybe even painless, I began to think to myself. But now my crew and I are starving to death slowly.

I walked back into the aft crew berthing area, It still smelled like death but i guess you get used to it after awhile. It didn't seem as strong. In the compartment I watched as my men looked at me with faces I had never seen before. They new now exaclty how bad our situation was. I would be willing to bet they would have liked to drown as well. Hell maybe those men of the earlier funeral services had it easy.

In the middle of one of the bunks was a bucket of fruit, some of the men went on and tried to peal the moldy layers of skin off to eat what little food we had left. Food was just one of the problems but being surrounded by water with no way of drinking it was another. In desperation some of the crew tried to drink the sea water but it only made things worse. We had rationed all our water and now it was gone. The only comfort came at night when the sea was calm and the air was cool.

I walked further back into the engine department where the mechanics worked to keep our one engine running. Shortly after nightfall the other diesel had burned up from lack of oil. I went did an about face, after saluting the men that were keeping our only chance or survival alive, and walked back towards the command room. Along the way I stopped by our radio operator in hopes of hearing some good news for a change. I ask him if he had heard any reports of German ship in the area. He didn't answer, I repeated the question but still no answer. I walked and stood in front of him and knelt down, slowly I
waved my hand in front of his face and watched his eyes there was no response. I called for the medic to get him and bring him into the forward berthing area. The medic then told me that this man was severly dehydrated and that his mind was shutting down. Without some water he would not make it. I noticed that alot of my crew was acting dilusional and the medic
assured me that it would only get worse as time went by.

I pointed to a man resting his head on a rusty pipe and told him to take the radio operators station. He relunctantly did as he was ordered and sat in the chair. "You let me know if you here anything from friendly ships" I yelled to him and then added "Its our only hope of survival"

The submarine continued to chug along the waves again it was nice weather but honestly at this point I would give my left arm for some rain atleast then we would have some fresh water. That was not the case instead the sun beat down in all of it glory onto our little boat. It was so bright at times that the reflection off the water was blinding the watchmen. I had reduced the watchcrew to only two men because of the severe dehydration of my crew. I myself was also starting to feel the effects of lack of food and water. There were times where I would simply stand there until a member of my crew tapped me on the shoulder to ask if I was ok. Then I would wake from my daze and resume my duties. For the life of me I never knew what I was dreaming about.

As the hours slowly moved on there was nothing on the submarine to do. The only thing that could be heard was the diesel engine struggling along, the waves outside lapping at the side of the U-66, and the gramaphone. The gramaphone by now was honestly started to irritate me, there are only so many time that you can listen to the words "It's a long way to tippirary"
but it did seem to keep the crews hopes up. I gathered my strength and walked to the foward berthing compartment. Now every bed in the area was filled with men to weak to carry out dutties. Next to many was a bucket filled with there past stomach contents of the day. I couldn't stand the smell and had to return to the command room. There was still no signal or radio message from the fleet. At that time I heard a loud explosion and it rocked the U-66. Black smoke billowed out of the engine campartment were the diesel engine was and the fire team sprang into action. As tired as my men were they still did there job. The fire was extinquished very quickly but the diesel engine was no longer running. I walked into the engine room and instantly my eyes teared from the strong smoke. I could bearly see the men in front of me staring at the engine now
covered in black oil.

'What happened?" I asked the officer in charge.
"We lost her, I think its from the lack of oil, I dont know if i can fix it sir." he replied.

I told him to do everything possible to get the engine running again, to take who ever he needed to help him. Without and engine we had better just shoot ourselves and get it over with. Still a thought in the back of my head at the time.

For atleast 8 hours the mechanics and crew made the engine room their home as they took parts from the the damaged starboard engine and moved the parts over to the port. It was a scene that would have made the very best machinest back at base quiver with fear of losing there job. My men were amazing they fought off the exhustion and worked in conditions that made a slave looked blessed. Some of the men cut and bleeding from the earlier attack worked in oil soaked clothes moving parts from one engine to the other. Slowly you watched as one engine began to look more like a pile of scrap metal then a powerfull diesel engine. The other engine started to take shape. They also came up with a way using some old pipe from the exhaust manifold to transfer much needed oil back into the circulation. It was very clever what they had come up with. As the sun started to go down the U-66 got very dark and we had to break out some lights to keep the engine comparment lit enough to see. I also chipped in to help and i felt like one of the crew at this time I forgot what rank I was and listened to the mechanical knowledge being yelled out around me. After what seemed like an eternity we were ready to give the repairs a try.

I gave the command to start the port diesel, as I silently prayed that it would work. The engine slowly turned over and I started to think that maybe the battery by now was dead. Then it turned a little faster but would not fire.

"Keep trying, without the engine we are dead!" I exclaimed to the officer as he again tried to fire up the diesel engine.

This time though the praying payed off. The engine started to turn faster and rev higher. I watched as a huge puff off dark black smoke came from the engine. Then as if the engine were returning from the dead she fired up. The lights throughout the U-66 slowly began to brighten. My mechanics had done it, they had saved our *** for now.

"When we get back to base I'm buying you guys all the drinks you can handle, now ahead standard!" I ordered as the U-66 slowly started moving through the water again. The engine was making some noises I had never heard a diesel make before but it was running, that all I cared about at this time. The U-66 and her crew made it past yet another trial.

I breathed a sigh of relief eventhough I knew our ordeal was far from over. My crew still needed water and food despreatly and even with our engine we only had enough fuel to last another 5 hours.

The radio had been silent, there was no updates or reports of any kind. This was odd but not too uncommon. I knew that everytime we transmitted our coded S.O.S. message we made it easier for the enemy to find us. This, however was a chance we had to take. I climbed the ladder into the conning tower and onto the bridge. The bridge crew was famished and barely able to stand but they were doing there best. I told the men to go down and get some rest the next crew was on the way. The followed me back into the belly of the U-66 and headed for the aft berthing compartment. The next watch crew made its way up the ladder and disappeared from sight as they stepped out onto the bridge.

I went back to my quarters and layed down in bed looking at the pictures of my own family wondering i I would ever see them again. Trying to find out why I took this job, this career. I was young and indestructable or so I thought. For now i was seeing that I was wrong. Maybe Dead wrong this time. I felt my chest and looked at my rank and metals. None of this could save me now. My uniform looked just like the men I served with. It was covered in dirt, oil, and stale blood. I sat up and picked up my journal to write some letters to home. I realy was scared at this point that I would never make it. Death
would be a pleseant surprise at this time though as my stomach growled for food. I leaned forward and threw up all over the
floor. The taste was horrible and I fought the gag reflexes. It wasn't a huge mess because there was no food for my stomach to get rid of. It was however a horrible feeling and it kept comming and going all day.

I put that thought out of my head and wiped my mouth off with the cleanest dirty towl I could find and began to write to my family. I didn't get but a sentence into the journal when to my horror.

"Aircraft spotted!" came down through the pipes used to transmit messages to the command room and then was repeated. I nearly hit my head as I jumped out of my bed and ran to the command room. I tried to reassure myself by saying that it was a german plane and would be here to help us but with our luck....

I stopped in the middle of my thought and yelled out.

"All crew general quarters, general quarters!"
"Man the flack guns, I repeat man the flack guns"
"All crews to assigned areas"

I sure as hell hope our luck has changed I thought to myself as my crew rushed around securing doors and climbing up the ladders onto the pitching deck of the U-66.
------------------------------------------------

Hope you enjoyed, currently engaged in combat in a crippled U-boat send air defence to my possition, we can not hold out much longer
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

William
Captain
U-66

Foehammer-1
02-02-2006, 08:36 AM
Just a thought, why won;t you just give up and press escape/ return to base or crash dive and get that nice little death message if you are playing D.i.D.?

William66th
02-02-2006, 03:01 PM
I'm just trying to get to friendly waters lol and it makes a good story to keep running. Also as for diving thats not going to happen becuase the hull intergrety is way to low and also the bow dive planes are destroyed. Once I reach friendly waters I will infact hit the excape button and get it over with. There is no way for me to dock lol I cant turn the darn boat and in real life I dont think that a uboat would infact lose all control of steering if the rudder were destroyed im sure there is some way to steer a few degrees at a time.

i'm just trying to play fair and as real as I can its fun. If I do lose the U-66 then I will start another career as another captain. I dont like begin able to reset and play my scenerio again. In real life lol Hide sight is always 20 / 20. I'm sure that alot of sub captains wish they could do it over in real life.

Plus again it makes a great story to tell in detail.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gifOver Active Imagination http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

William
Captain
U-66

Stuntcow
02-02-2006, 06:57 PM
THAT IS GREAT....Damn, it had to stop. Was reading with my heart in my throat and beating a mile a minute. Can not wait for the next installment.

JohnL_
02-02-2006, 10:30 PM
This is almost as good as reading a Tom Clancey book, I have found myself at school rooting for the crew of 66 and hoping that some Type 34 or Tug will hear the cries for help and pull them home. Needless to say I can see this as a battlecry somewhat like remember the Hood or the Maine, when you sink a Nelson or some capitol ship a cry will be heard over the radio, remember the 66.

William66th
02-05-2006, 11:07 PM
I'm am glad that you like it. As I stated I have an overactive imagination so its nice to see that some people do like it. I'm writing the 4th part now and will be posting it soon. SH3 never ceases to amaze me at times and when you read my story part 4 based on actual events in the game you will see why.

Thanks again for taking the time to read my stories. I can continue to write things like this as long as people would want to read them and for as long as the U-66 and crew stay alive.

Thanks again for reading and I will have the 4th part up hopefully with screen shots.

William
Captian
U-66

William66th
02-08-2006, 05:55 PM
My apologies for not having the 4th part of story up yet but right now my PC is messing up big time. I think it was Depth Charged while I was away today. I came back to smell something burning in my room and when I turned the lights on I found black smoke sorta billowing out of it. My CPU fan had died and well sorta burnt the mother board up. So I'm writing this from my work laptop at this time. My Pc system has slowly degraded since the problem and I now think I have no choice but to go and get a new system or build one of my own. SH3 will not run on my work computer and even if it could lol my boss wouldn't like it too much.

So I will be down for a little bit until then.
I'm looking for some peoples advice on a new system.

ANY IDEAS?

Question is about graphic cards
Does anyone understand PCI and AGP graphic cards. I went looking today at computers and there is a new thing called PCI Express. They told me that PCI is faster then AGP.

Also can someone tell me what is better
Pentium intel
or
AMD

I just am looking for some help so I can get back to my submarine and crew.

Thanks again for all your help in advance and also as soon as I'm able my fourth patrol report / story will be up soon.

Thanks
William
Captain
U-66
(In Dry dock having extensive repairs completed)

Also does the SH3 game engine take into acount damages and the time at base required to repair them or is the time at base fixed to a certain time frame no matter what.

Sorry for all the questions
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

JohnL_
02-08-2006, 10:09 PM
It seems everyone is jumping on the PCI Express, but if you look at the stats there is only a slight margin in performance. This is dropping the price on AGP cards which IMO isn't somthing to cull,I got a ATI Radeon 9550 256MB card (AGP) for half of what I would have paid a month ago.

I'm running: a Asus K8V SE Deluxe mobo with a AMD Anthlon 64 and a ATI Radeon 9550 and I got to say when the Atlantic is really pitching you almost get seasick.

William66th
02-08-2006, 10:29 PM
thanks for the reply do you know where i can find stats that you mention ?

JohnL_
02-09-2006, 07:28 AM
I couldn't find the original page but here is one that is similer to the one I read.
PCI vs AGP (http://www.tcmagazine.info/articles.php?action=show&id=127&perpage=1&pagenum=5)