PDA

View Full Version : Be Still my heart! A Potentially airworthy He-162?



Waldo.Pepper
01-11-2007, 08:43 PM
http://www.historicaircraftcollection.ltd.uk/news/index...quires_a_Heinkel_162 (http://www.historicaircraftcollection.ltd.uk/news/index.html#Aero_Vintage_acquires_a_Heinkel_162)

Hmm pity we didn't spend the bucks to make it potentially airworthy when it was in Ottawa.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/sig/p61rev.jpg

Waldo.Pepper
01-11-2007, 08:43 PM
http://www.historicaircraftcollection.ltd.uk/news/index...quires_a_Heinkel_162 (http://www.historicaircraftcollection.ltd.uk/news/index.html#Aero_Vintage_acquires_a_Heinkel_162)

Hmm pity we didn't spend the bucks to make it potentially airworthy when it was in Ottawa.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/sig/p61rev.jpg

tom19073
01-11-2007, 08:57 PM
wow, imagine the he-162 flying with the new build me-262 and fw-190 at your local airshow. increadible.

VW-IceFire
01-11-2007, 09:45 PM
Mmmmm interesting. I should dig up my pictures. I took pictures of the Canadian Air Museum's He-162...mostly everything looked to be there. But it didn't look like it would be something that would fly if put together. I'm no engineer so who knows....very interesting!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://home.cogeco.ca/~cczerneda/sigs/icefire-tempestv.jpg
Find my missions at Flying Legends (http://www.flying-legends.net/php/downloads/downloads.php?cat_id=19) and Mission4Today.com (http://www.mission4today.com).

DFLion
01-11-2007, 10:03 PM
Hi Icefire,
Sorry this is not about the He162 - I am trying to contact you regarding a Tempest question - I sent an email via the 'Flying Legends' website - any chance of indicating that you got it?
Regards,
DFLion

Vamandrac_Steam
01-11-2007, 10:19 PM
Something as rare as the He 162 should not be flown, but if they want to restore it to that condition that would be great.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/9081/stukakingdefaultla9.jpg
Jeder Tag der Niederlage ein Sieg!

papotex
01-11-2007, 10:33 PM
would be great if the people that made the fully functional copy of the me262 would make one of the HE162. i love that thing

woofiedog
01-11-2007, 11:52 PM
Extremely Mint! Hope they put the rebuild history into a book. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/WOOFIEDOG.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/

Feathered_IV
01-11-2007, 11:54 PM
I didn't see the bit about re-flying the 162. Only the DH-9. Did I miss something?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

***********************************************

http://server2.uploadit.org/files/Feathered-sigpic.jpg

"Intelligent, normally observant and answered all questions freely. He was arrogant and proud to be a pilot. Fellow prisoners in hospital consider him mentally unstable."

WOLFMondo
01-12-2007, 12:19 AM
A flying 162 would be neat. I've read it has really nice controls harmony but the tail will rip itself off if the rudder is used to assist in a roll!!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Cheers!!

nsteense
01-12-2007, 12:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Feathered_IV:
I didn't see the bit about re-flying the 162. Only the DH-9. Did I miss something? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The article seems to focus on the DH9, and a potentionally airworthy He162, as part of the exchange. They don't spent a lot of words on the Heinkel...
Would love to see it fly, though!! Even if it would be the only one of its kind flying...


Because remember, Stukaking, there are a few examples around in various musea. If in worst case scenario, it would be destroyed in a crash (god forbid), it wouldn't be the end to see it in real life. It's something else if it would be the very last of its kind.

fighter_966
01-12-2007, 01:01 AM
Heinkel wasn so stable plane according French who tested them after war; Source Aeroplane magazine. Pilot must be good to fly that thing..Nice plane anyway...

woofiedog
01-12-2007, 02:31 AM
A bit of info from Russian captured He-162...

http://www.airpages.ru/img/he162a2.jpg

Link: http://www.airpages.ru/cgi-bin/epg.pl?nav=lw50&page=he162

http://www.airpages.ru/cgi-bin/epg.pl?nav=ru11&page=troph

Also more info on the devolopment of the He-162 and the He-280...

Link: http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/2072/He162.html

http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=3065

The Chino He-162... Link: http://www.thomasgenth.de/survivors/He162_A2_Chino/he162_a2_chino.html

One more idem, He-162 ejector seat experiments from a P-61B Black Widow...

A Black Widow participated in early American ejector seat experiments performed shortly after the war. The Germans had pioneered the development of ejector seats early in the war, the first-ever emergency use of an ejector seat having been made on January 14, 1942 by a Luftwaffe test pilot when he escaped from a disabled Heinkel He 280 V1. American interest in ejector seats during the war was largely a side-effect of the developmental work done on pusher aircraft such as the Vultee XP-54, with the goal being giving the pilot at least some slim chance of clearing the tail assembly and the propeller of the aircraft in the case of an emergency escape. However, not very much progress had been made, since pusher aircraft development had never really gotten past the drawing board or the initial prototype stage. However, the development of high-speed jet-powered aircraft made the development of practical ejector seats mandatory. Initially, an ejector seat was "borrowed" from a captured German Heinkel He 162 and was installed in a Lockheed P-80 in August of 1945. However, it was decided that the single-seat P-80 would not be suitable for these tests, and it was decided to switch to a three-seat Black Widow. A P-61B-5-NO (serial number 42-39489) was modified for the tests, the ejector seat being fitted in the forward gunner's compartment. The aircraft was redesignated XP-61B for these tests (there having been no XP-61B prototype for the initial P-61B series). A dummy was used in the initial ejection tests, but on April 17, 1946 a brave volunteer by the name of Sgt. Lawrence Lambert was successfully ejected from the P-61B at a speed of 302 mph at 7800 feet. With the concept having been proven feasible, newer jet-powered aircraft were brought into the program, and the XP-61B was reconverted back to standard P-61B configuration.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/WOOFIEDOG.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/

trumper
01-12-2007, 07:20 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif How many here think the CAA will allow this to fly.

PFflyer
01-12-2007, 07:59 AM
The original He-162 was put together with some bad glue that had acid in it that ate the material the plane was made out of!
Because of this they were total deathtraps killing just about everyone who flew the things, including german test pilots and english test pilots when wings and other stuff came off the planes in flight.

I imagine if there was an He-162 still sitting around as it was built back in the day it either would have just fallen to pieces by now, or it would be so brittle you could kick it and knock a part of it right off.

Bremspropeller
01-12-2007, 08:26 AM
Make sure your copy uses the correct glue http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/757/he162ot2.jpg
A thing like this could ruin your whole day!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/2369/toryusig4me.jpg

Waldo.Pepper
01-12-2007, 12:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">A thing like this could ruin your whole day! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those are from a film, which is still floating around btw.

I don't imagine it will ever, be allowed to fly again. However, do remember that Mosquito's are wooden too, and there is at least one still flying.

I too have some pictures of the plane when it was in Ottawa. I shall post them if I can find them.

The Canadian website still mentions that it is still on their museum btw. So maybe the deal fell through!?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v516/WaldoPepper/sig/p61rev.jpg

Viper2005_
01-12-2007, 12:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StukaKing:
Something as rare as the He 162 should not be flown, but if they want to restore it to that condition that would be great. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it was the last one, I might agree. But it isn't.

OTOH, given its performance and construction issues (weak brakes and a single, rather questionable engine, whilst wood and glue perhaps pose inspection issues), getting a C of A might be something of a challenge...

Vamandrac_Steam
01-12-2007, 02:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Viper2005_:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StukaKing:
Something as rare as the He 162 should not be flown, but if they want to restore it to that condition that would be great. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it was the last one, I might agree. But it isn't.

</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oh so since there is more than one it is expendable? Its a rare aircraft and it doesnt matter if there is one or twelve it shouldnt be flown. Every year we lose more and more warbirds to accidents and once these planes are gone they are gone. A plane such as the He 162 was not built like a regular plane anyway. It was a Nazi last ditch effort that was hurried through production. Its not worth the risk.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/9081/stukakingdefaultla9.jpg
Jeder Tag der Niederlage ein Sieg!

Blottogg
01-12-2007, 02:28 PM
Anybody notice the Nimrod II restoration a little futher down linked page? That looks interesting too. I'll have to hit Barnes & Noble to see if Flypast or Aeroplane has a story on it.

As to the brakes and engine, the text leads me to believe that in contemplating a return to airworthiness, they were going to replace these with more modern components. Not authentic for the purists, but a wise concession to safety in my opinion. As to the wooden construction, there are plenty of Bellancas flying around with wooden spars, as well as other types. As long as they can access the bits that need inspecting (either directly or with a borescope), deterimining whether it's still airworthy or not should be possible. Provided the effort is professional, I think the risk is minimal and worthwhile.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Blotto

"A poor plan, violently executed, is better than no plan at all." - "Sledge"

JG54_Lukas
01-12-2007, 03:09 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Viper2005_:
If it was the last one, I might agree. But it isn't.

OTOH, given its performance and construction issues (weak brakes and a single, rather questionable engine, whilst wood and glue perhaps pose inspection issues), getting a C of A might be something of a challenge... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep, I highly doubt a fully restored He 162 would ever receive airworthy clearance, given the conditions under which they were made. On a related note, the placard for the He 162 at the Planes of Fame museum in Chino, CA says it will "soon be restored to flyable status" - of course, it has said that for a long time now. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Viper2005_
01-12-2007, 03:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StukaKing:
Oh so since there is more than one it is expendable? Its a rare aircraft and it doesnt matter if there is one or twelve it shouldnt be flown. Every year we lose more and more warbirds to accidents and once these planes are gone they are gone.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

And once you park them in a museum they cease to be aeroplanes and become, well, dead.

The trouble with museums is that for obvious reasons you can't let the general public experience the aeroplanes (sit in the cockpit, open up the access panels and see what's under the skin etc.).

All that the average punter gets out of the experience is looking at what used to be an aeroplane from a respectful distance.

If you fly the aeroplanes, people can see them, hear them, even feel and smell them (there's nothing like standing behind a Spitfire as it warms up and feeling the propwash, smelling the avgas and hearing that glorious sound!). They come to life.

Sure, they'll crash from time to time.

But if you don't fly them, what's the point? For the most part, there's nothing about a static museum piece that couldn't be done by a well made plastic model.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by StukaKing:
A plane such as the He 162 was not built like a regular plane anyway. It was a Nazi last ditch effort that was hurried through production. Its not worth the risk. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

This is a totally different issue. Airworthiness is a clear issue with this sort of aeroplane, but it isn't an insurmountable problem - it's just likely to be expensive and time consuming. They said that the Vulcan would never fly again, but now that's very much on the cards. Where there's a will, there's often a way.

Vamandrac_Steam
01-12-2007, 09:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Viper2005_:

And once you park them in a museum they cease to be aeroplanes and become, well, dead.

The trouble with museums is that for obvious reasons you can't let the general public experience the aeroplanes (sit in the cockpit, open up the access panels and see what's under the skin etc.).

All that the average punter gets out of the experience is looking at what used to be an aeroplane from a respectful distance.

If you fly the aeroplanes, people can see them, hear them, even feel and smell them (there's nothing like standing behind a Spitfire as it warms up and feeling the propwash, smelling the avgas and hearing that glorious sound!). They come to life.

Sure, they'll crash from time to time.

But if you don't fly them, what's the point? For the most part, there's nothing about a static museum piece that couldn't be done by a well made plastic model.

This is a totally different issue. Airworthiness is a clear issue with this sort of aeroplane, but it isn't an insurmountable problem - it's just likely to be expensive and time consuming. They said that the Vulcan would never fly again, but now that's very much on the cards. Where there's a will, there's often a way. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hey I agree that its nice to see these planes flying. My father flew WWII planes for many years for a museum, but most of these planes are 60 years old now. I would rather future generations actually see these aircraft sitting in a museum than not at all. I dont think its going to matter in the case of the He 162 anyway...I doubt anyone will give clearance for it to fly again.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/9081/stukakingdefaultla9.jpg
Jeder Tag der Niederlage ein Sieg!

woofiedog
01-13-2007, 06:31 AM
Bremspropeller... Excellent set of still frames... showing the self destruct of the He-162. Are those from a British or German film?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/WOOFIEDOG.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/

Bremspropeller
01-13-2007, 02:26 PM
It shows the german test-pilot crashing.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img41.imageshack.us/img41/2369/toryusig4me.jpg

woofiedog
01-13-2007, 02:45 PM
Bremspropeller... Thank's for the info.

The first prototype of the He-162 was rolled out at the beginning of December 1944. It made its first flight on 6 December from the airfield at Schwechat near Vienna, with test pilot Gotthold Peter at the controls.

The flight lasted 20 minutes until one of the wooden gear doors fell off, a victim of a faulty glue bond. Peters landed the aircraft immediately. The flight had otherwise gone well, with the little jet reaching a top speed of 840 KPH (522 MPH) at an altitude of 6 kilometers (19,700 feet), although some fore-and-aft instability and directional snaking was noted.

On 10 December, Peter took the prototype into the air from Schwechat to show it off to Nazi Party officials. He was making a fast run over the airfield when one of the wings came partly unglued and shed an aileron. The prototype rolled into the ground and Peters was killed.

Link:
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=htt...Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DN (http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://balsi.de/Weltkrieg/Waffen/Flugzeuge/he162.htm&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=5&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3DHeinkel%2BHe%2B162%2BVolksj%25C3%25A4 ger%26start%3D20%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DN)
http://www.aviation.technomuses.ca/collections/artifact...sjager(120086).shtml (http://www.aviation.technomuses.ca/collections/artifacts/aircraft/HeinkelHe162A-1Volksjager(120086).shtml)
http://www.axishistory.com/index.php?id=1153
http://ipmsstockholm.org/magazine/1997/06/stuff_eng_detail_he162.htm<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v438/woofiedog/WOOFIEDOG.jpg

Hunter 82's PC component shop
http://www.magnum-pc.com/
https://usm.channelonline.com/magnumpc/storesite/Search/External/