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View Full Version : Japanese soldiers continue to fight 29 years after WW2



Alloy007P
07-17-2007, 09:35 PM
http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/soldiersurr.htm

Alloy007P
07-17-2007, 09:35 PM
http://history1900s.about.com/od/worldwarii/a/soldiersurr.htm

SkyChimp
07-17-2007, 09:41 PM
My boss was in the Philippines in the late 1950s and at that time there were still small raids by Japanese soldiers going on. Personel and their families were not allowed to travel outside the naval base without armed escort, or at night at all. Japanese soldiers and hostile natives were still a threat.

T_O_A_D
07-18-2007, 09:25 AM
I saw a show on him on History Channel a year or so ago.

Do a google search there is tons of stuff on him and the like.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiroo_Onoda

http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/profiles/onoda.html

http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9605/26/philippines.straggler/

Towards the bottom in a white box is metnion of a few more of them that held out too.
http://darbysrangers.tripod.com/Okinawa/id8.htm

Personally think he was just a hard headed, feller that didn't really want to quit, and didn't respect his nations, willingness to surrender, and carried on his own little war againt humanity.

Crash_Moses
07-18-2007, 10:00 AM
...sometimes right in this very forum. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

SeaFireLIV
07-18-2007, 10:09 AM
I think I saw something about this years ago. I rememebr a litle guy coming to some news conference.

Anyway, I reckon he was simply a product of his society. He had a duty to follow and he was going to do it. In such a culture, death is better than surrender and he wasn`t allowed to kill himself. It was unbelieveable to most japanese of the time that defeat was possible and without the social interaction and news from Japan it`s quite feasible to believe that he would stay out there fighting that long.

He was probably also a little naive to believe a war could last so long, but then time probably becomes one long stretch of day and night.

Personally, I`d have him in my army if I was a General. You can`t buy that kind of loyalty.

Heliopause
07-18-2007, 11:36 AM
Years ago I read a story of a german tank that was found in a forest in the stalingrad region.
A body was found and a diary. reading it revealed that the first crewmember died in 1943. (think it read "of wounds"). A second in '55/'56. The third in '84 and the last man shortly before they found him in '87. All those years they weren't fighting but surviving.
( I type this from memory so I can't tell if it's true or if any details differ).
It was a story in one of my books for English class. Should have copied it....

slo_1_2_3
07-18-2007, 01:55 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Heliopause:
Years ago I read a story of a german tank that was found in a forest in the stalingrad region.
A body was found and a diary. reading it revealed that the first crewmember died in 1943. (think it read "of wounds"). A second in '55/'56. The third in '84 and the last man shortly before they found him in '87. All those years they weren't fighting but surviving.
( I type this from memory so I can't tell if it's true or if any details differ).
It was a story in one of my books for English class. Should have copied it.... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Um they were outa gas and ammo right? otherwise that could have turned out worse

Sergio_101
07-18-2007, 02:45 PM
http://www.wanpela.com/holdouts/list.html

Last confirmed "holdout" was in 1980 in the Phillipines".
then I was on GUAM in 1973 we heard a Japanese had surrendered the previous year.

I suggest many died in the jungles and may never
be known. These men were fanatical.

Last official German surrender was on a island
off of Norway May25 1945. It was a weather station.

Sergio

Zeus-cat
07-18-2007, 06:49 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Personally, I`d have him in my army if I was a General. You can`t buy that kind of loyalty. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

There is loyalty and there is blind devotion to duty. One is honorable, the other is not.

The Nuremburg Trials were all about showing the world that every soldier has to make sure his orders are lawful and deserve to be carried out. Soldiers waging war years after a war have ended are criminals and should be tried in a court of law in my opinion.

AVG_WarHawk
07-18-2007, 07:03 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
There is loyalty and there is blind devotion to duty. One is honorable, the other is not.

The Nuremburg Trials were all about showing the world that every soldier has to make sure his orders are lawful and deserve to be carried out. Soldiers waging war years after a war have ended are criminals and should be tried in a court of law in my opinion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Either way it would certainly beat Seppuku (Hara-Kiri).

zardozid
07-18-2007, 09:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">There is loyalty and there is blind devotion to duty. One is honorable, the other is not.

The Nuremburg Trials were all about showing the world that every soldier has to make sure his orders are lawful and deserve to be carried out. Soldiers waging war years after a war have ended are criminals and should be tried in a court of law in my opinion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


IMO: These men suffered from mental illness...

Whether it was chemical (from birth) or the result of their extreme wartime experience (military indoctrination, wartime hysteria, horrific experiences, shame, post traumatic stress), these men where clearly unable to adjust to the changing world and opted (in more ways then one) to live outside of it...

STENKA_69.GIAP
07-19-2007, 05:00 AM
I read Onoda's book some years ago. His problems seemed to begin before the end of the war. It appears that he was in disagreement with his colleagues and superior officers. Probably why he didn't get promoted and got dumped on a nameless island. You know.. the type of team player that is "always right" and everyone else is wrong.

It's not just the civilians he killed. It makes you cringe as he describes how he drives on his last two companions to their deaths while they try to explain to him black is black and white is white.

If you can get hold of the book please read it - maby I'm wrong but to me he comes over as a monumentaly stupid person and lacking an appropriate sense of remorse.

SeaFireLIV
07-19-2007, 06:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by STENKA_69.GIAP:
I read Onoda's book some years ago. His problems seemed to begin before the end of the war. It appears that he was in disagreement with his colleagues and superior officers. Probably why he didn't get promoted and got dumped on a nameless island. You know.. the type of team player that is "always right" and everyone else is wrong.

It's not just the civilians he killed. It makes you cringe as he describes how he drives on his last two companions to their deaths while they try to explain to him black is black and white is white.

If you can get hold of the book please read it - maby I'm wrong but to me he comes over as a monumentaly stupid person and lacking an appropriate sense of remorse. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I`ll have to read the book when I find it. Sounds interesting.

SeaFireLIV
07-19-2007, 06:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
Soldiers waging war years after a war have ended are criminals and should be tried in a court of law in my opinion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

But they did not believe the war had ended, so I don`t agree, as much as I am greatly saddened for those killed because of their mistake.

J_Anonymous
07-19-2007, 07:35 PM
Japanese soldiers were not allowed to surrender. Even family members of POW's were persecuted back home.

In this tragic case, he was what may be now called a special operations officer. The marching order he received was, to stay in the allies occupied island after the rest of the troops withdraw, and continue guerrila warfare to disrupt and pin occupiyng force, thereby ensuring safe withdrawal of his comrades. Since he was not allowed to surrender, he was expected to continue on until his death. Does continuing for 3 decades look absurd? Yes. Mentally ill? Perhaps, after years of isolation and forced hardship. Does he deserve ridicule? I am not sure. Nobody wants to die, and he didn't want to die, either, that's all.

If my memory serves correctly, his mother gave him a short sword, so that he could commit honorable suicide if necessary (remember, becomeing a POW was not an option). He kept the sword until he finally went back home, and returned it to his old mother. He was just a soldier who wanted to meet his mother again, like everyone else.

Sergio_101
07-20-2007, 08:52 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by J_Anonymous:
Japanese soldiers were not allowed to surrender. Even family members of POW's were persecuted back home.

In this tragic case, he was what may be now called a special operations officer. The marching order he received was, to stay in the allies occupied island after the rest of the troops withdraw, and continue guerrila warfare to disrupt and pin occupiyng force, thereby ensuring safe withdrawal of his comrades. Since he was not allowed to surrender, he was expected to continue on until his death. Does continuing for 3 decades look absurd? Yes. Mentally ill? Perhaps, after years of isolation and forced hardship. Does he deserve ridicule? I am not sure. Nobody wants to die, and he didn't want to die, either, that's all.

If my memory serves correctly, his mother gave him a short sword, so that he could commit honorable suicide if necessary (remember, becomeing a POW was not an option). He kept the sword until he finally went back home, and returned it to his old mother. He was just a soldier who wanted to meet his mother again, like everyone else. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Keep in mind that a japanese recieved his orders from GOD.
An Emperor god.

Quite the mindphuck there, you can not disobey GOD.

Sergio

Blood_Splat
07-20-2007, 09:03 AM
Japanese boot camp consisted of getting the shat kicked out of you on a daily basis. These guys were already screwed up mentally after boot camp.

Ruy Horta
07-20-2007, 11:25 AM
IIRC there was evidence that he knew the war was over, that he just couldn't accept to surrender.

At some point one must accept that in mass armies people with mental lability are bound to join the forces.

The statement on lack of remorse might proof a sociopathic tendency.

Abbuzze
07-20-2007, 12:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by J_Anonymous:
Japanese soldiers were not allowed to surrender. Even family members of POW's were persecuted back home.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Same for Soldiers of the Red Army. If you were a POW in Germany (and survived this), you had serious troubles in post war USSR.

KIMURA
07-20-2007, 02:31 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by STENKA_69.GIAP:
............he comes over as a monumentaly stupid person and lacking an appropriate sense of remorse. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

..........and that's why war works that good! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

joeap
07-20-2007, 03:03 PM
Well not all were nutjobs check this out.

Another thread (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/2231028575)