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DROBNJAK1960
11-01-2009, 10:59 AM
here in a "New SoW screens" thread, there is an image of a pilot with a parachute. In those days of WWII pilots were sitting on the parachute.

As it can clearly be seen in the above image, parachute was hanging quite low. Now, presume that chap had to jump out of the plane, since all the harnesses and cords were inside that parachute bag, he would end up hanging with his head down and legs up.

Maybe just a funny observation, but does somebody know how did pilot end up upright, if parachute was made for him to hung upside down?

DROBNJAK1960
11-01-2009, 10:59 AM
here in a "New SoW screens" thread, there is an image of a pilot with a parachute. In those days of WWII pilots were sitting on the parachute.

As it can clearly be seen in the above image, parachute was hanging quite low. Now, presume that chap had to jump out of the plane, since all the harnesses and cords were inside that parachute bag, he would end up hanging with his head down and legs up.

Maybe just a funny observation, but does somebody know how did pilot end up upright, if parachute was made for him to hung upside down?

Choctaw111
11-01-2009, 11:28 AM
The chute can be down that low. It is where the risers are connected at the top of the harness that makes the difference.
The risers are the cords grouped together that fan out to the chute when it is opened.

horseback
11-01-2009, 11:28 AM
While the parachute 'pack' may have hung around the pilot's seat, the key consideration is where the straps are anchored. They simply folded the parachute and most of its straps and lines into the pack with enough of the straps left to allow the pilot to sit or stand up straight with the harness on.

cheers

horseback

RSS-Martin
11-01-2009, 11:43 AM
If you have ever seen a fighter seat from that period, you would understand why a chute was carried that way. Without the chute there, you would be sitting in a bin sort of thing.
Which would be very uncomfortable.
http://www.jagdgeschwader68.net/pics/fw190/FW190A8_Cockpit_1.gif

DKoor
11-01-2009, 11:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RSS-Martin:
If you have ever seen a fighter seat from that period, you would understand why a chute was carried that way. Without the chute there, you would be sitting in a bin sort of thing.
Which would be very uncomfortable.
http://www.jagdgeschwader68.net/pics/fw190/FW190A8_Cockpit_1.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>+1

There was no cushion in ww2 fighters http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif .

JG53_Valantine
11-01-2009, 12:11 PM
Using the parachute as a seat cushion makes sense as its saves on wasted weight.
Probably would have made bailing a bit more difficult than with today's style chutes
especialyl since there seems to be a much larger chance of being caught up whilst jumping
V

AirRanger
11-01-2009, 12:23 PM
The risers are the cords grouped together that fan out to the chute when it is opened.
Choctaw111,
Close, but not correct. What you discribed are the suspention lines,which is what are attached to the risers. At that time would have been about 3 inch cotton webbing. 2ea on each side (front and rear).

Kettenhunde
11-01-2009, 12:51 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">more difficult than with today's style chutes </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


You mean like this?

http://www.harveyrihn.com/soft...eatpack_sitting.html (http://www.harveyrihn.com/softie_parachutes_aerobatic_harness_chute_seatpack _sitting.html)

Choctaw111
11-01-2009, 03:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AirRanger:
The risers are the cords grouped together that fan out to the chute when it is opened.
Choctaw111,
Close, but not correct. What you discribed are the suspention lines,which is what are attached to the risers. At that time would have been about 3 inch cotton webbing. 2ea on each side (front and rear). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm pretty sure I said the portion that grouped together, not where they actually fan out.
I always thought they could have been a bit more ergonomic for holding on to rather than just a strip of material.
Assuming you got the AirRanger name from where I think you got it, then you would have experience with this stuff as well.

RPMcMurphy
11-01-2009, 03:33 PM
This is an interesting thread and for some reason it reminded me of the time I traded a stack of paper quailfication targets with a parachute rigger for some 550 cord. He said he would get me some 550. I said okay and gave him a stack of paper targets so the next day he came into my office with a big box of bundled suspension lines that had been cut from unservicable T-10C chutes. It was the suspension lines from thirty chutes.
I still have about 3-miles of of that 550 cord. Its amazing what you can collect after so many years on jump staus.

Choctaw111
11-01-2009, 03:52 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RPMcMurphy:
This is an interesting thread and for some reason it reminded me of the time I traded a stack of paper quailfication targets with a parachute rigger for some 550 cord. He said he would get me some 550. I said okay and gave him a stack of paper targets so the next day he came into my office with a big box of bundled suspension lines that had been cut from unservicable T-10C chutes. It was the suspension lines from thirty chutes.
I still have about 3-miles of of that 550 cord. Its amazing what you can collect after so many years on jump staus. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I could never get enough 550 cord. I have a few hundred meters of it, but I wish I still had more.
It is amazing the things that you collect just being in the combat arms period.
My basement has so much Army stuff. My wife says I need to get rid of some of it...Yeah right.

Kettenhunde
11-01-2009, 03:55 PM
It comes in rolls and you can get it can get it at SSSC. Back in the late 80's when I was in Bco. 2nd Plt 1/75th Inf, there was shortage of 550 cord. We were directed to cut ONE suspension line from our parachute on one jump. The riggers had a conniption and the BC was almost relieved but we got 550 cord. Suddenly big army found all kinds of 550 cord to fix our chutes before RRF.

With 550 cord and 100mph tape, you can fix anything.

All the best,

Crumpp

Choctaw111
11-01-2009, 04:56 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kettenhunde:
Back in the late 80's when I was in Bco. 2nd Plt 1/75th Inf, there was shortage of 550 cord. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I didn't know you in the 75th infantry. Great stuff! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif You were 11 series, right?
What do you think about the new Berets? I don't mean to hi-jack, but I just had to say something here.

Kettenhunde
11-01-2009, 06:50 PM
5 1/2 years in hard victor slots before I went to selection. Yes I was an 11 Bang Bang.

I was angry at first with Shinseki. Now I think it is a very high compliment to the Regiment. As with anything Special Operations does or adopts, the Regular Army is sure to follow.

All the best,

Crumpp

RPMcMurphy
11-01-2009, 08:14 PM
I did a little checking on this and I found some good links but now I gotta hallass to work.
Check photo#3
http://www.303rdbg.com/uniforms-gear-fighter.html
and at 3:31 of this video. Pilots with their gear mounting up.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...1zOs&feature=related (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drE0D_Z1zOs&feature=related)