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View Full Version : How much dose it cost to leave it on?



georgeo76
10-10-2005, 10:22 AM
Is it better to leave a computer on all the time, or to turn it off during non-use from the perspective of power consumption?

How can we tell how much juice our computer pulls anyway? I know how to figure kilowatt hours, but dose my power supply pull it's rated 520w constantly?

What would be the most effective power conserving options and what factors are most important? What components use the most power?

georgeo76
10-10-2005, 10:22 AM
Is it better to leave a computer on all the time, or to turn it off during non-use from the perspective of power consumption?

How can we tell how much juice our computer pulls anyway? I know how to figure kilowatt hours, but dose my power supply pull it's rated 520w constantly?

What would be the most effective power conserving options and what factors are most important? What components use the most power?

p1ngu666
10-10-2005, 10:35 AM
doesnt pull its max wattage all the time, dunno what it costs tho...

bear in mind, with winter coming, 90% or more of the energy used actully comes out as heat if i remmber correctly, so its good for heating http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

FoolTrottel
10-10-2005, 11:08 AM
Just take a look at the components that have the biggest fans (cooling systems).
Those are the ones producing the most heat, thus using the most energy ... p1ngu666 got it spot on here.

If you need to leave it switched on, and want to use a little power as possible, then use as little CPU/GPU power as possible ... Configure Power Options to switch off Harddisks and other things etc.

If you want to know more accurately, put a fuse in between the pc and the power. Use series of 'm, of different specs. Start with a high fuse, test, go lower. Once one blows out, you know it must have used a bit more power than the fuse could handle, and a bit less than the previous fuse ....

(Weird thinkin' I know... just ignore it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif )

Guess if you would start measuring the power usage, you'd see it peak whenever IL2 is running ...

Have Fun!

Dew-Claw
10-10-2005, 11:47 AM
or spend the money on a good UPS.
one that switches to power conservation mode when the system has been idle for a while.

If your goona spend the money on a high dollar rig, you should spend the money to protect it also.

StellarRat
10-10-2005, 01:04 PM
Turn it off. Specially the monitor. You'll never make up for the power used with fancy UPS's or "power saving" settings.

p1ngu666
10-10-2005, 01:13 PM
i had a via system that used very little power, sadly it broke awhile ago, dunno if it was the cheap psu, mobo or what that died but it no longer worked http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

for web and non power hungry things it was fine http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

georgeo76
10-10-2005, 01:14 PM
I will never put a UPS on my rig. The reason is that I have a special insurance policy on my computer, one that is worth much more than the rig itself. Believe me, every time I hear thunder, I run to turn the PC on http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

FYI: A floater policy on your home owners/ renters insurance for your computer is extremely cheap. A years policy will run you less than the average surge protector. And it covers many things a UPS cannot.

dbillo
10-10-2005, 03:12 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FoolTrottel:
Guess if you would start measuring the power usage, you'd see it peak whenever IL2 is running ... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I was curious about that myself. My UPS has a utility which monitors the power demand on it, but I don't know exactly how accurate it is. I left it running on my secondary monitor to see what happens. With nothing running, the draw is 156 watts. Just starting Forgotten Battles, at the main menu, the consumption jumps to 180 watts. While playing the Black Death track, the consumption went up to 250 watts.

Specs: Athlon 64 3500+, 6800 Ultra, 480W PSU
Also plugged into UPS: small stereo, cordless phone, 1600x1200 LCD monitor, router, mug warmer (hey, if the power fails, I still want my hot coffee!)

Kuna15
10-10-2005, 03:47 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by p1ngu666:
doesnt pull its max wattage all the time, dunno what it costs tho...

bear in mind, with winter coming, 90% or more of the energy used actully comes out as heat if i remmber correctly, so its good for heating http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I tend to leave my PC on during day all the time if I know I wont be far from it for long period of time.
But you are right, there is considerable heat that is produced by PC especially helpfull during winter days. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

han freak solo
10-10-2005, 03:58 PM
I tend to turn things off when I don't use them. Same with my rig.

A side benefit is that since the fans inside aren't spinnin', I don't have to clean the fuzz out as often.

The PCs at my office look like vacuum cleaners.

shotdownski
10-10-2005, 04:16 PM
Turn everything off if your going to be away for more than about a half hour.

The power consumption varies with what the PC is doing. If you're working it hard, like flying IL-2, it may be drawing 300 or more watts. If at idle maybe only about 60. FYI - the power your TV uses also varies quite a bit depending on what's on the screen; a bright, light colored scene draws way more than a dark scene.

Keep in mind that for every watt that you use (or waste), about three watts worth of fossil fuel (eg. coal) must be consumed. There is a great environmental benefit in not wasting electricity.

Waldo.Pepper
10-10-2005, 04:30 PM
My opinion.

If you leave your computer on it get hot right?
So hot it needs fans to stay cool.
These fans are often enough filled with dust.
These fans are moving parts.
The moving parts are the parts on a computer that fail most often right?

So what happens when the fans fail?
The dust, if present will catch fire.

Your computer will likely burn and be destroyed.

Is this computer in your home?
You home is made of flamable material.
Your home may burn down.

True it is a remote possiblity. (Similar in principle to an asteroid killing all life on earth.) But remote possibilities are near certainties over a long enough time period - or in cases with lots of actors.

Is you think this is worth whatever potential enegy/hardware lifecycle savings you may enjoy by not turning your computer off - then leave it on.

If my computer is not doing something - I turn it off. I have four computers in my home office. It is often the case that one of them is doing something. But if not then I turn them off.

Dew-Claw
10-10-2005, 05:08 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Turn it off. Specially the monitor. You'll never make up for the power used with fancy UPS's or "power saving" settings. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


LOL some of us have them up most of the time anyway.
Some of us have systems we also conduct buisness on.
Some of us have extensive networks which need to stay up and can be energy hogs.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

georgeo76
10-11-2005, 08:50 AM
OK for anyone who cares:

I used a psu calculator (http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/Power_Supply_Calculator.php?cmd=AMD)

and figure my computer averages 317 watts.

OK, so if I leave my computer on 24/7:

[317*720/1000]= 228.24 kilowatt hours in a 30 day month

if you take that figure and multiply it by my power rate (7.5 cents/kilowatt hour) you get $17.12/ month. not too cheap.

But if you figure that I turn it off when I'm not using it. (say I average 3 hours of comp time a day)

[317*90/1000]=28.53 kilowatt hours

That works out to $2.14 (1/8 the cost!)

So we can see that turning it off can make a huge difference in cost.

Taylortony
10-11-2005, 09:04 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by georgeo76:
OK for anyone who cares:

I used a psu calculator (http://www.jscustompcs.com/power_supply/Power_Supply_Calculator.php?cmd=AMD)

and figure my computer averages 317 watts.

OK, so if I leave my computer on 24/7:

[317*720/1000]= 228.24 kilowatt hours in a 30 day month

if you take that figure and multiply it by my power rate (7.5 cents/kilowatt hour) you get $17.12/ month. not too cheap.

But if you figure that I turn it off when I'm not using it. (say I average 3 hours of comp time a day)

[317*90/1000]=28.53 kilowatt hours

That works out to $2.14 (1/8 the cost!)

So we can see that turning it off can make a huge difference in cost. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


I wont point out that leaving equipment on can be better for it as its the initial boot up and power spike that as well as thermal shock that can kill electronics...... a system thats running does not have this problem......... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Fehler
10-11-2005, 09:58 AM
With the money you save, you can afford a TIR in about eight months!

georgeo76
10-11-2005, 10:07 AM
LMAO

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Fehler:
With the money you save, you can afford a TIR in about eight months! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

georgeo76
10-11-2005, 11:41 AM
Oh yea, don't forget that monitor.

Mine averages 100w, so that's an extra $5.40 on the 24/7 model, but a mere 68 cents if it's only on for 3hrs/day.

Pirschjaeger
10-11-2005, 12:13 PM
Just turn off the monitor and net connection when your not using the pc. The monitor for obvious reasons and the net for security reasons.

It always makes me chuckle when someone asks a question like this. Not laughing at the question but rather the question not asked. You can actually save enough in a year to afford a new pc.

You burn the most electricity with heating/cooling componants. Lights, radio, and pc's done use much. Your stove/oven, toaster, refridgerator, heaters, and a/c are the ones that cost you. But there's more.

Depending how you turn things on sets the rate. Guess what? The rate can only go up during the monthly cycle. I know this really good but it's always been hard for me to explain, bare with me.

Ever notice how your house has more than one meter? Ever ask why? Simple, and dirty in my opinion. One meter sets the price. Let's say, at the first of your cycle, you turn everything on in the house at the same time. It's kinda like at the amusement park when you nail the game with a hammer and the meter measures the strength of your hit. The difference is, the ball doesn't come down. Same goes for your meter. Suddenly draw a lot of power and you just set a high price for the rest of the month.

Make sure you give some time between turning on hot/cold appliances(10-15mins). That will keep your price lower.

I know about this because a friend of mine used to run a restaurant. He asked me to come in and see if I could streamline his operation. I spent a few days watching how things worked and found so many flaws. I also called the local power company to come to the restaurant and explian what the different meters represented. With what I learnt I made up a schedule for turning on and off the equipment. I cut their monthly power costs by almost 50%.

I know a home is different and you won't cut your costs by 50%, but with a little simple planning you'll never worry about the cost of your pc.

Fritz

shotdownski
10-11-2005, 01:07 PM
Fellas, please keep in mind that the combination of each of our individual actions can be significant. A few extra watt-hours per day may seem inconsequential, but multiplied by tens of millions of PC users over the course of a year, the power wasted is significant.

If an electronic device is warm, then it's "on". If it's "on" and not doing work, then the power consumed is wasted.

I again must stress that for each watt that you consume (either doing usefull work or being wasted keeping a power supply warm), about three "watts-worth" of coal is burned. Think: strip mine, acid rain, and mercury deposition.

Taylortony
10-11-2005, 02:42 PM
Yup...shotdownski I have heard of that, the save a tree, kill a beaver theory..

We can always go back to the Bucket of Instant sunshine process.......... But its the "not on my doorstep brigade that kills that off"


Fraid its the consumer society, Use and abuse the world, till we end that we will get nowhere.. I have to admit although we have 3 bins and a bag here one for Garden refuge, one for plastics, one for paper products and one for the rest, I dont recycle

I truly believe that by chucking all our plastics etc in a big hole in the ground we are laying down the future resources for our children, they will re-excavate these pits in the future by which time the technology will be available to use these items far better than the technology we have at the moment... To be honest even as things are, the normal trash bin is emptied every alternate week, recyled ones the other week and in 2 weeks I do not produce enough waste to 1/2 fill a single UK dustbin... So I must be doing something right. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

fabianfred
10-11-2005, 06:52 PM
my computer is on 24/7 and it is connected to my ADSL on line too because i like to use the P2P networks....
the monitor is switched off when i'm not there as those use the most power...
Here in Thailand where the atmosphere is quite humid... unless you can afford air conditioning... it is probably better having it on all the time.
all the little electrical plugs/connections will heat up when on ...thence expand...when off cool/contract which allows the damp air to get in and maybe oxidise causing bad connectivity