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Waldo.Pepper
11-09-2008, 12:03 AM
Canada Remembers.

This is the spot that the Government of Canada is running this year for Remembrance Day. For the majority of you from somewhere else I thought you might find it interesting.

The continuity running through it impressed me.
I wish it was better quality.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xwhh9hgB2Lw


Edit Better version

http://www.youtube.com/watch?aq=f&emb=0&eurl=http%3A%2F...embers&v=r0IYZEXAJNM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?aq=f&emb=0&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo.google.ca%2Fvideosearch%3F q%3Dcanada+remembers&v=r0IYZEXAJNM)

Waldo.Pepper
11-09-2008, 12:03 AM
Canada Remembers.

This is the spot that the Government of Canada is running this year for Remembrance Day. For the majority of you from somewhere else I thought you might find it interesting.

The continuity running through it impressed me.
I wish it was better quality.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xwhh9hgB2Lw


Edit Better version

http://www.youtube.com/watch?aq=f&emb=0&eurl=http%3A%2F...embers&v=r0IYZEXAJNM (http://www.youtube.com/watch?aq=f&emb=0&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fvideo.google.ca%2Fvideosearch%3F q%3Dcanada+remembers&v=r0IYZEXAJNM)

Low_Flyer_MkIX
11-09-2008, 01:26 AM
S!

Nicely done. Especially this weekend, it may interest Canadians reading this that as part of their educaton, schoolchildren from my part of the world are taken across the Channel to Vimy Ridge where the Canadian conribution and sacrifice during a sad chapter of history are taught to them on site. The more inquisative, of course, delve deeper into the history of your nation and appreciate it even more. This a good thing.

Muddy17
11-09-2008, 01:59 AM
Im greatfull when I here stuff like that, It means my granfather's sacrifices were not in vain, but my childrens school system {public} does not seem interested in teaching the youngster's why its said Canada became a Nation in WWI. Might offend sombody I guess???

Thanks

Muddy17
11-09-2008, 02:04 AM
Regarding remembrance day,, Is Canada the only country to recognize the end of WWI?? November 11 11am??

Low_Flyer_MkIX
11-09-2008, 02:08 AM
We hold silences at 11a.m. on November 11th and the nearest sunday to it in the U.K. The sunday is when most of the commemorative parades happen.

Uufflakke
11-09-2008, 02:56 AM
We as cheese eating Dutchmen are very grateful to the Canadian soldiers who liberated us from occupation in 1945. Every year at Liberation Day we celebrate the end of WWII and after all those years the Canadian veterans still come over to take part in the festivities at the 5th of May.

Watch this video of a Canadian battalion from Ontario fighting their way through the Dutch city of Groningen in '45:

http://s143.photobucket.com/albums/r134/51highland/?act...urrent=Groningen.flv (http://s143.photobucket.com/albums/r134/51highland/?action=view&current=Groningen.flv)


These images speak for themselves...

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh195/Uufflakke/netherlandsb1.jpg

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh195/Uufflakke/nld_cheers.jpg

http://i256.photobucket.com/albums/hh195/Uufflakke/nld_rijssen.jpg

Thanx Canada!

P.FunkAdelic
11-09-2008, 03:32 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Muddy17:
Im greatfull when I here stuff like that, It means my granfather's sacrifices were not in vain, but my childrens school system {public} does not seem interested in teaching the youngster's why its said Canada became a Nation in WWI. Might offend sombody I guess???

Thanks </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Actually its money I think. They took WW1 off the History 12 curriculum in my school district because it cost too much to put it on the final exam. *rolls eyes so hard he goes blind*

But my Socials 11 teacher was brilliant. He did make us appreciate it. Problem isn't that they don't have it in the curriculum entirely but that most high school history teachers are illiterate and don't know about our history.

My grandfather is a vet of WW2 and he was part of the liberation of the Dutch. My childhood is full of memories of his war stories. Its really helped me to appreciate the sacrifices better.

I feel a pride for what my nation had done and its too bad that many Canadians seem to not even notice.

jensenpark
11-10-2008, 09:53 AM
Nice find Waldo.

I love the Dutch just because of the way they honour and cherish the Canuck vets.

I think we're finally starting to see an upswing in recognition of our Vets in schools and public. The Dominion Institute has done a great job with the memory project - getting vets into schools to speak.

http://www.thememoryproject.com/index.asp

Even the utterly dysfunctional school my kids go to have vets visit regularly.

Buzzsaw-
11-10-2008, 05:42 PM
In Flanders Fields 1915
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-1918)
Canadian Army

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

&lt;&lt;&lt;

McCrae's "In Flanders Fields" remains to this day one of the most memorable war poems ever written. It is a lasting legacy of the terrible battle in the Ypres salient in the spring of 1915. Here is the story of the making of that poem:

Although he had been a doctor for years and had served in the South African War, it was impossible to get used to the suffering, the screams, and the blood here, and Major John McCrae had seen and heard enough in his dressing station to last him a lifetime.

As a surgeon attached to the 1st Field Artillery Brigade, Major McCrae, who had joined the McGill faculty in 1900 after graduating from the University of Toronto, had spent seventeen days treating injured men -- Canadians, British, Indians, French, and Germans -- in the Ypres salient.

It had been an ordeal that he had hardly thought possible. McCrae later wrote of it:

"I wish I could embody on paper some of the varied sensations of that seventeen days... Seventeen days of Hades! At the end of the first day if anyone had told us we had to spend seventeen days there, we would have folded our hands and said it could not have been done."

One death particularly affected McCrae. A young friend and former student, Lieut. Alexis Helmer of Ottawa, had been killed by a shell burst on 2 May 1915. Lieutenant Helmer was buried later that day in the little cemetery outside McCrae's dressing station, and McCrae had performed the funeral ceremony in the absence of the chaplain.

The next day, sitting on the back of an ambulance parked near the dressing station beside the Canal de l'Yser, just a few hundred yards north of Ypres, McCrae vented his anguish by composing a poem. The major was no stranger to writing, having authored several medical texts besides dabbling in poetry.

In the nearby cemetery, McCrae could see the wild poppies that sprang up in the ditches in that part of Europe, and he spent twenty minutes of precious rest time scribbling fifteen lines of verse in a notebook.

A young soldier watched him write it. Cyril Allinson, a twenty-two year old sergeant-major, was delivering mail that day when he spotted McCrae. The major looked up as Allinson approached, then went on writing while the sergeant-major stood there quietly. "His face was very tired but calm as we wrote," Allinson recalled. "He looked around from time to time, his eyes straying to Helmer's grave."

When McCrae finished five minutes later, he took his mail from Allinson and, without saying a word, handed his pad to the young NCO. Allinson was moved by what he read:

"The poem was exactly an exact description of the scene in front of us both. He used the word blow in that line because the poppies actually were being blown that morning by a gentle east wind. It never occurred to me at that time that it would ever be published. It seemed to me just an exact description of the scene."

In fact, it was very nearly not published. Dissatisfied with it, McCrae tossed the poem away, but a fellow officer retrieved it and sent it to newspapers in England. The Spectator, in London, rejected it, but Punch published it on 8 December 1915.

AWL_Spinner
11-10-2008, 06:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Regarding remembrance day,, Is Canada the only country to recognize the end of WWI?? November 11 11am?? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No, but I must say, as a British expat, Canada seems to treat the day with much more regard than anywhere else I've been - it's a national holiday of remembrance, for starters, and the TV/Radio coverage is far, far greater than it ever was "back home".

One of the many things I like about Canada!

gamer025
11-10-2008, 06:35 PM
As a Canadian I wish more people here and in other countries knew of the enormous contribution we made to both world wars and all the peacekeeping and aid afterward. Many people think Canada is still a "little" country that didn't do anything or barely did anything.

As a "little" country we made huge contributions especially during WW2. We were the only commonwealth nation to produce armed forces equal to England.

As I once read someone after the Second World War, England could no longer go on "pretending" we were a colony anymore.

Canadians are very tough and in both wars we served as "shock troops" for England.

General Patton once said "The Canadians are the best troops the Brits have got. And they're American!"

EDIT: I don't want anyone to think I'm tooting Canada's horn. I don't claim to say that we are super important and that other "little" countries like Australia and New Zealand didn't do anything because they too made huge contributions. I don't pretend that we did as much as USA did either. I think all nations that took part deserve their share of respect. To me Remembrance Day isn't just for Canada or the UK... it's for all nations who's servicemen gave their lives for us and for those they didn't even know.

Skunk_438RCAF
11-10-2008, 07:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by gamer025:

EDIT: I don't want anyone to think I'm tooting Canada's horn. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Dude, there is nothing wrong with being patriotic. Pride for your country and it's servicemen is always going to be something that holds us together, no matter if we think the motives for fighting are right or wrong.

I actually have to work tomorrow, but I will demand to take the required 2 minutes of silence at 11am.

Low_Flyer_MkIX
11-10-2008, 07:19 PM
S! gamer025 - as an Englishman, I agree with your sentiment, and I'm sure I'm not the only one.

Do any of you Canucks like the idea of trying to get a local school here to 'twin' with a Canadian school over the internet to share the experience of the Vimy Ridge trip? Would have lot going for it, culturally and historically.

I'm sounding a few people out before I hassle a teacher friend of mine.

TSmoke
11-10-2008, 08:01 PM
Low Flyer does have a good idea but with the way governments work it would take a year or two to arrange such a thing.

I do know the government does send one student from each province over to Europe to visit the battle grounds of WW1 and 2. Exactly which department I cannot remember but I think it is Vetrans Affairs.

The education system here does not teach any or a very minimal amount of history let alone military history, which is a dissapointment. The majority of people in Canada do not even know why we have Rememberance Day, and the reasons behind it.

It has fallen by the way side like so many things in the late 20th and now the 21st century.

As for Canadas contibutions to WW1 out of a Total population of 8 million, enlistment was over 600,000 troops. Of those 10% were KIA and 30% were WIA.

Canadians as a whole for some reason shrug off the honour and sacrifice that was made for all.

I have family that fought on both sides in WW1 and 2 and still we serve today so it is a rather somber time for us.

No hero worship or glorification of deeds past and present,Canada as a whole soldiers on in silence.

Waldo.Pepper
11-10-2008, 09:34 PM
For any budding tourists who wish some trivia about Ottawa and the Dutch Tulip connection.

http://www.hickerphoto.com/data/media/24/parliament_hill_ottawa_T1308.jpg

In 1945, the people of Holland presented Ottawa with over 100,000 tulip bulbs in appreciation of Canada's dual role of harboring the Royal family members and aiding with the liberation of the Netherlands. In 2004, researching the correct numbers of tulips available in the National Capital Region, the Dutch Canadian Association in Ottawa asked Marie-Ève Létourneau from the National Capital Commission to help recover the right data. Here are her words verbatim. Please mention the source if you use the following text:

"Each Spring, between 3 to 5 million tulips bloom throughout the region. This approximate number includes the 1 million tulips that the NCC manages annually in its parks and on its properties, as well as the many tulips planted by the Canadian Tulip Festival's official partners and the general public. Most of our bulbs are renewed every two years, except for the ones found on high profile attraction sites, such as Parliament Hill, Major's Hill Park and the National War Memorial. In this particular case, the NCC is responsible for changing some 500,000 bulbs each year, and it is important to note that all bulbs removed by our contractors are usually used to make compost.

"As for the most impressive tulip beds, they can be found on two Canadian Tulip Festival official sites, which are Commissioners Park, where the NCC plants 300,000 tulips each year and Major's Hill Park (40,000 tulips). The beds found on Parliament Hill are also known to be quite spectacular with 33,000 tulips blooming each year. You can also appreciate a considerable amount of tulips along Colonel By Drive (4 beds between Bank Street and Bronson for a total of 31,000 tulips) and Queen Elizabeth Drive (10 beds along driveway between Laurier Street and Bank Street for a total of 43,000 tulips).

"The NCC buys tulips every year. For example, in Fall 2002, the crown corporation bought 400,000 bulbs, which were planted in various sites. In a scenario like this one, our contractors make sure that all purchased bulbs are supplied by Holland. Also, all bulbs donated to the NCC come specifically from Holland. A significant quantity (10,000) is donated by Princess Juliana (who passed away in 2004) and the Dutch Bulb Growers Association (10,000), who both have made a tradition of sending bulbs each year as a symbol of appreciation for Canada's contribution in the liberation of the Netherlands during World War II."

gamer025
11-10-2008, 10:03 PM
I think the poppies need to be redesigned. I don't like the needle applicator. I'd rather have a safety-pin style applicator or something. Safer and would stay on easier. They always fall off somehow.

Quelty
11-11-2008, 01:44 AM
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old;
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Lest we forget.

Buzzsaw-
11-11-2008, 01:51 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Uufflakke:
We as cheese eating Dutchmen are very grateful to the Canadian soldiers who liberated us from occupation in 1945. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks for your post. It comments like yours that make us as a people not regret our sacrifices. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

P.S. We are called "Cheese-eaters" too... by our buddies down south. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Buzzsaw-
11-11-2008, 02:20 AM
Salute

Canadians are particularly proud of our record in the First World War.

We became the "Shock Troops" of the British Army, with a record of offensive success unmatched by any other nationality.

The first battle of note involving the Canadians was the 2nd Battle of Ypres in April of 1915, the first use of poison gas by the Germans. (first use by either side) While French troops broke and ran, the Canadians stood and fought, holding their positions. The troops had urinated on their hankerchiefs and bound them over their mouths. (the urine acted to partially neutralize the gas effect)

The next major battle to involve Canadians was the Somme in the summer of 1916. There was no real success there of course, the Somme was a wasteful failure, although the Canadians distinguished themselves with their sacrifice.

The next battle involving the Canadians was first great offensive success achieved by the Allied side since the war started. This was the taking of Vimy Ridge in April 1917, the hill which dominated the area of the front. The Canadian Corps of 4 divisions used innovative artillery fire techniques and fire and movement to take an objective which had defied all previous Allied attempts.

Then it was on to Passchendaele, in the which was another costly failure of poor planning by the British General Staff. The Canadians did distinguish themselves by being the troops who finally took the town of Passchendaele on November 6th 1917.

But the Canadian's finest moment probably came at the Battle of Amiens on Aug. 8th 1918. This was the first major Allied offensive to follow the German spring offensive, and was the outstanding Allied success of the war. The Canadian Corps, along with the Australians on their left flank, advanced 7 miles in the first day, an unheard of distance in WWI during trench warfare, and by the end of the battle, 30,000 Germans were dead or prisoners, at a cost of half that number of Allied losses. More importantly the advance broke out into open country and the Germans began a long retreat. The stalemate of the trenches was broken. The Commander of the German Army, Erich Ludendorf, called August 8th, "The Black Day of the German Army", because the first instances of Germans surrendering in large numbers took place.

After that, the Canadian Corps led the Allied advance, by war's end, they were the farthest advanced of any Allied formation, capturing the City of Mons on November 11th 1918.

But we lost heavily during the war. 64,944 Canadians died in WWI, more than the number who paid the ultimate price in WWII.

The last British or Commonwealth soldier to die in WWI, (and probably the last Allied soldier) was Canadian, Private George Lawrence Price, Regimental Number: 256265, 15 December 1892 – 11 November 1918. He died at two minutes before 11:00 AM, the time the Armistice came into effect.

http://www.findagrave.com/photos/2006/284/9792310_116065598137.jpg