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woofiedog
10-03-2006, 11:45 PM
http://p-38online.com/images/skis.JPG
A P-38J was also fitted with experimental retractable snow ski landing gear, but this idea never reached operational service, either.

VIP Transport

A P-38L was modified by Hindustan Aeronautics in India as a fast VIP transport, with a comfortable seat in the nose, leather-lined walls, accommodations for "refreshments," and a glazed nose to give the passenger a spectacular view.

Carrier Based

Lockheed proposed a carrier-based Model 822 version of the Lightning for the United States Navy. The Model 822 would have featured folding wings, an arresting hook, and stronger undercarriage for carrier operations. The Navy wasn't interested, as they regarded the Lightning as too big for carrier operations and didn't like liquid-cooled engines anyway, and the Model 822 never went beyond the paper stage. However, the Navy did operate four land-based F-5Bs in North Africa, with these aircraft inherited from the USAAF and redesignated "FO-1."

Mid-Air Refueling

A P-38J was used in experiments with an unusual scheme for mid-air refueling, in which the fighter snagged a drop tank trailed on a cable from a bomber. Astonishingly, they got this to work, but unsurprisingly decided it wasn't practical.

Crew and Cargo Transports

Standard Lightnings were even used as crew and cargo transports in the South Pacific. They were fitted with pods attached to the underwing pylons, replacing drop tanks or bombs, that could carry a single passenger in a lying-down position or cargo. This was a very uncomfortable way to fly. Some of the pods weren't even fitted with a window to let the victim see out or bring in light. One fellow who hitched a lift on a P-38 in one of these pods later said that whoever designed the damn thing should have been forced to ride in it.

http://p-38online.com/images/float.jpg

Float Plane

One of the most unique aircraft designs during the war was with P-38 floatplane. It never came to fruition as an operational aircraft, and never was tested. This design called for a P-38 to be fit onto large floats while its regular landing gear was retracted. These floats would then be filled with fuel allowing the aircraft to be ferried across the pacific. Early in the war, the American aircraft presence in the Pacific was woefully inadequate. Bases still were using outdated aircraft such as the Brewster Buffalo, which were no match against Japanese fighters. There were heavy bombers such as the B-17, but they were not effective against moving shipping targets in the ocean. Though the Battle of Midway was a decisive victory, the aircraft being used were mismatched. The victory would be attributed to knowledge of Japanese codes, perfect timing, courage of the pilots, and plain luck. General Arnold knew that the American forces needed a boost in available, modern aircraft to fight the Japanese. By December 1942, P-38s were being used in operations in Buna and other locations in the southwest Pacific.

As with problems getting the aircraft to the field of battle in Europe, many were questioning how to get adequate numbers of aircraft to bases in the Pacific. The floatplane design in theory would allow P-38s to be able to fly extreme distances until it needed to refuel. This idea also called for the P-38s to make landings in protected waterways, where they would be refueled and resume their flight to their new base of operations. Once the P-38 was within range of the home base, explosive charges would remove the floats, and the aircraft would then land normally. One problem that needed to be addressed was the tail section. The tail would pose problems during takeoff and landing on the water. One way to address this problem was to raise the entire tail section. Wind tunnel tests revealed minimal performance loss. However, since the Battle of Midway put the Japanese on the defensive, it would not be dangerous to ship the new P-38s to Australia, where they would be ferried to their bases of operations. This idea never got off the drawing board, but a P-38 was tested with a raised tail. Kelly Johnson was interested to see how it would be affected by compressibility. No substantial results were obtained, and no further raised tailed P-38s were tested.

Link:
http://p-38online.com/flight2.html


P-38 ace pilot Tommy Lynch took the time to write down tactics he learned while in combat. His leadership among his men was perhaps more valuable than his "ace" status as a pilot. At the time he wrote his tactics, he was equal with Bong with 20 kills.

Radio Control

Control of the radio was essential for successful combat operation of more than one flight. According to Lynch, keeping the radio talk to information of immediate importance was the key. Also, the length of messages should be as short as possible. Ideally, the pilots should include key words such as "low", "high", or "same level" as much as possible. Keeping the radio free from excessive chatter kept the pilots focused and alert.

Weather

When planning a mission, the weather must be taken into account. Tropical weather conditions are unpredictable and the pilots must keep track on changing conditions throughout the mission.

Tactics for Escorting Heavy Bombers & Medium Bombers

When escorting heavy bombers, a slow weave pattern must be used above the bombers. The bombers slow speed must not slow down the fighters flying escort. The escorting fighters must be flying at a decent speed to engage enemy aircraft on a moments notice. The squadron should be three to five thousand feet above the bomber formation.

If the P-38s escort medium bombers, the weave pattern is not necessary due to the higher speeds of the bombers. The flight should still fly about three to five thousand feet above the bomber formation.

Offensive Patrol

Flying without escort duties allows the pilots a high degree of flexibility. When the squadron encounters enemy aircraft, the commander must determine the action to be taken. If there are only few enemy aircraft, one flight may be detached. In instances of large numbers of enemy aircraft, the commander may decide to engage, but should run if there are no advantages or at a disadvantage. Individual pilots must use the advantages of the P-38, and it is essential that the pilot not get into instances where the Zero has an advantage. Steep climbs at slow speeds should not be used against the Zero. At altitudes above 20,000 feet, the P-38 has a definite climbing advantage. Circular maneuvers against Zeros must never be used due to the maneuverability of the Zero. However, head-on attacks favor the P-38 due to its concentrated area of firepower and durability of the airframe. The P-38 has the ability to pick its own fight and can avoid combat when at a disadvantage.

Takeoff and Climb

On base, all pilots should have their equipment ready to go at a moments notice. When taking off, pilots need to get into formations as quickly as possible, and when climbing to maximum altitude, pilots should use a much manifold pressure as possible. In squads of sixteen planes, 35 inches and 2,800 rpm's permits enough throttle play for formation to remain intact.

Contacting Enemy Bombers with Fighter Cover

When the P-38 formation encounters enemy bombers with fighter cover, two flights should break away to the left to circle back for another attack. The remaining two flights should break off to the right and circle back for another attack. Attack fighter escorts as the situation demands. Lynch believed that the war would not be won in a single day, so the pilots should keep looking around and not to take reckless chances.


Whatever Happened To The Lockheed P-38K?

Link: http://home.att.net/~C.C.Jordan/P-38K.html (http://home.att.net/%7EC.C.Jordan/P-38K.html)


The P-38 incorporated many firsts into its design, these included the following:

The first fighter to use a tricycle landing gear.
The only American fighter in operational production status from the start to the finish of the war.
First to encounter compressibility problems.
First to demonstrate capability of a fighter flying across the North Atlantic for delivery to Europe.
Only aircraft to be equipped with irreversible power-boosted flight controls.
First fighter to fly anywhere with two torpedoes.
First fighter to demonstrate a non-stop, un-refueled range of over 3,000 miles.
First fighter to carry a 4,000 lb. bomb load in wartime conditions.
Only massed produced, single seat, twin engine fighter in World War II.

P-38 sounds Link:
http://p-38online.com/sounds.html

woofiedog
10-03-2006, 11:45 PM
http://p-38online.com/images/skis.JPG
A P-38J was also fitted with experimental retractable snow ski landing gear, but this idea never reached operational service, either.

VIP Transport

A P-38L was modified by Hindustan Aeronautics in India as a fast VIP transport, with a comfortable seat in the nose, leather-lined walls, accommodations for "refreshments," and a glazed nose to give the passenger a spectacular view.

Carrier Based

Lockheed proposed a carrier-based Model 822 version of the Lightning for the United States Navy. The Model 822 would have featured folding wings, an arresting hook, and stronger undercarriage for carrier operations. The Navy wasn't interested, as they regarded the Lightning as too big for carrier operations and didn't like liquid-cooled engines anyway, and the Model 822 never went beyond the paper stage. However, the Navy did operate four land-based F-5Bs in North Africa, with these aircraft inherited from the USAAF and redesignated "FO-1."

Mid-Air Refueling

A P-38J was used in experiments with an unusual scheme for mid-air refueling, in which the fighter snagged a drop tank trailed on a cable from a bomber. Astonishingly, they got this to work, but unsurprisingly decided it wasn't practical.

Crew and Cargo Transports

Standard Lightnings were even used as crew and cargo transports in the South Pacific. They were fitted with pods attached to the underwing pylons, replacing drop tanks or bombs, that could carry a single passenger in a lying-down position or cargo. This was a very uncomfortable way to fly. Some of the pods weren't even fitted with a window to let the victim see out or bring in light. One fellow who hitched a lift on a P-38 in one of these pods later said that whoever designed the damn thing should have been forced to ride in it.

http://p-38online.com/images/float.jpg

Float Plane

One of the most unique aircraft designs during the war was with P-38 floatplane. It never came to fruition as an operational aircraft, and never was tested. This design called for a P-38 to be fit onto large floats while its regular landing gear was retracted. These floats would then be filled with fuel allowing the aircraft to be ferried across the pacific. Early in the war, the American aircraft presence in the Pacific was woefully inadequate. Bases still were using outdated aircraft such as the Brewster Buffalo, which were no match against Japanese fighters. There were heavy bombers such as the B-17, but they were not effective against moving shipping targets in the ocean. Though the Battle of Midway was a decisive victory, the aircraft being used were mismatched. The victory would be attributed to knowledge of Japanese codes, perfect timing, courage of the pilots, and plain luck. General Arnold knew that the American forces needed a boost in available, modern aircraft to fight the Japanese. By December 1942, P-38s were being used in operations in Buna and other locations in the southwest Pacific.

As with problems getting the aircraft to the field of battle in Europe, many were questioning how to get adequate numbers of aircraft to bases in the Pacific. The floatplane design in theory would allow P-38s to be able to fly extreme distances until it needed to refuel. This idea also called for the P-38s to make landings in protected waterways, where they would be refueled and resume their flight to their new base of operations. Once the P-38 was within range of the home base, explosive charges would remove the floats, and the aircraft would then land normally. One problem that needed to be addressed was the tail section. The tail would pose problems during takeoff and landing on the water. One way to address this problem was to raise the entire tail section. Wind tunnel tests revealed minimal performance loss. However, since the Battle of Midway put the Japanese on the defensive, it would not be dangerous to ship the new P-38s to Australia, where they would be ferried to their bases of operations. This idea never got off the drawing board, but a P-38 was tested with a raised tail. Kelly Johnson was interested to see how it would be affected by compressibility. No substantial results were obtained, and no further raised tailed P-38s were tested.

Link:
http://p-38online.com/flight2.html


P-38 ace pilot Tommy Lynch took the time to write down tactics he learned while in combat. His leadership among his men was perhaps more valuable than his "ace" status as a pilot. At the time he wrote his tactics, he was equal with Bong with 20 kills.

Radio Control

Control of the radio was essential for successful combat operation of more than one flight. According to Lynch, keeping the radio talk to information of immediate importance was the key. Also, the length of messages should be as short as possible. Ideally, the pilots should include key words such as "low", "high", or "same level" as much as possible. Keeping the radio free from excessive chatter kept the pilots focused and alert.

Weather

When planning a mission, the weather must be taken into account. Tropical weather conditions are unpredictable and the pilots must keep track on changing conditions throughout the mission.

Tactics for Escorting Heavy Bombers & Medium Bombers

When escorting heavy bombers, a slow weave pattern must be used above the bombers. The bombers slow speed must not slow down the fighters flying escort. The escorting fighters must be flying at a decent speed to engage enemy aircraft on a moments notice. The squadron should be three to five thousand feet above the bomber formation.

If the P-38s escort medium bombers, the weave pattern is not necessary due to the higher speeds of the bombers. The flight should still fly about three to five thousand feet above the bomber formation.

Offensive Patrol

Flying without escort duties allows the pilots a high degree of flexibility. When the squadron encounters enemy aircraft, the commander must determine the action to be taken. If there are only few enemy aircraft, one flight may be detached. In instances of large numbers of enemy aircraft, the commander may decide to engage, but should run if there are no advantages or at a disadvantage. Individual pilots must use the advantages of the P-38, and it is essential that the pilot not get into instances where the Zero has an advantage. Steep climbs at slow speeds should not be used against the Zero. At altitudes above 20,000 feet, the P-38 has a definite climbing advantage. Circular maneuvers against Zeros must never be used due to the maneuverability of the Zero. However, head-on attacks favor the P-38 due to its concentrated area of firepower and durability of the airframe. The P-38 has the ability to pick its own fight and can avoid combat when at a disadvantage.

Takeoff and Climb

On base, all pilots should have their equipment ready to go at a moments notice. When taking off, pilots need to get into formations as quickly as possible, and when climbing to maximum altitude, pilots should use a much manifold pressure as possible. In squads of sixteen planes, 35 inches and 2,800 rpm's permits enough throttle play for formation to remain intact.

Contacting Enemy Bombers with Fighter Cover

When the P-38 formation encounters enemy bombers with fighter cover, two flights should break away to the left to circle back for another attack. The remaining two flights should break off to the right and circle back for another attack. Attack fighter escorts as the situation demands. Lynch believed that the war would not be won in a single day, so the pilots should keep looking around and not to take reckless chances.


Whatever Happened To The Lockheed P-38K?

Link: http://home.att.net/~C.C.Jordan/P-38K.html (http://home.att.net/%7EC.C.Jordan/P-38K.html)


The P-38 incorporated many firsts into its design, these included the following:

The first fighter to use a tricycle landing gear.
The only American fighter in operational production status from the start to the finish of the war.
First to encounter compressibility problems.
First to demonstrate capability of a fighter flying across the North Atlantic for delivery to Europe.
Only aircraft to be equipped with irreversible power-boosted flight controls.
First fighter to fly anywhere with two torpedoes.
First fighter to demonstrate a non-stop, un-refueled range of over 3,000 miles.
First fighter to carry a 4,000 lb. bomb load in wartime conditions.
Only massed produced, single seat, twin engine fighter in World War II.

P-38 sounds Link:
http://p-38online.com/sounds.html

general_kalle
10-04-2006, 07:54 AM
interesting read relly.
thanks for the info.
wish we had a p38 with torpedos

Col._King
10-04-2006, 09:28 AM
Thank you very much, Woofiedog!

As I always said, the P-38 was the best all-around fighter the US had.

BTW, are you a P-38 Fan? Maybe we can have a chat... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Cheers

Daiichidoku
10-04-2006, 09:28 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/p38g-6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/mystery0231.jpg


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/p38f-2-1.jpg



http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/P38badjob.jpg



http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/disagree.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/p38-39.jpg

Daiichidoku
10-04-2006, 09:43 AM
moreton bay, south queensland, Oz, early-mid 1942 F-4 "photo-joe" recce
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v479/Daiichidoku/moretonbays.jpg

woofiedog
10-04-2006, 01:02 PM
Daiichidoku... Excellent photo's... the Crew & Cargo version looks a bit on the cramped side for a long haul across the Pacific.

The Lockheed P-38K and the Torpedo versions would add Very nicely to IL-2.

Quote... * What astounded the evaluation team was the incredible rate of climb demonstrated by the P-38K. From a standing start on the runway, the aircraft could take off and climb to 20,000 feet in 5 minutes flat! The "K", fully loaded, had an initial rate of climb of 4,800 fpm in Military Power. In War Emergency Power, over 5,000 fpm was predicted.*

By the way... it looks like those P-38's never flew off the ground. Those Spinners are still shining like New!

Col._King... PM me.

general_kalle... Thank's

F19_Ob
10-05-2006, 03:29 AM
Great post.

Low_Flyer_MkVb
10-05-2006, 05:52 AM
Bump! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif