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Kaleun1961
01-12-2008, 08:35 PM
Got this one in my email and thought some of you might like to get this baby lined up for a spread. She's empty in these pics; you can see that easily as the decks are bare and by how much of her hull is up out of the water, including the bulbous nose and props.

Text of the email and pics below:

This is how Wal-Mart gets all its stuff from China. Get a load of this ship!

15,000 containers and a 207' beam! And look at the small crew-size for a ship

longer than a US aircraft carrier (which has a complement of 5,000 men and

officers).

Think it's big enough? Notice that 207' beam means it was NOT designed for
the Panama or Suez Canal. It is strictly trans-pacific. Check out the
cruise speed: 31 knots means the goods arrive 4 days before the typical
container ship (18-20 knots) on a China-to-California run. So this
behemoth is hugely competitive carrying perishable goods.

This ship was built in three, or perhaps as many as five sections. The

sections floated together and then were welded. The ship is named

Emma Maersk. The command bridge is higher than a 10-story building

and has 11 crane rigs that can operate simultaneously.



Additional info:
Country of origin - Denmark
Length - 1,302 ft
Width - 207 ft
Net cargo - 123,200 tons
Engine - 14 in-line cylinders diesel engine (110,000 BHP) Cruise Speed - 31
knots, Cargo capacity - 15,000 TEU (1 TEU = 20 ft3 container)
Crew - 13 people First Trip - Sept. 08, 2006 Construction cost - US
$145,000,000+
Silicone painting applied to the ship bottom reduces water resistance and
saves 317,000 gallons of diesel per year .

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM01.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM02.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM03.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM04.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM05.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM06.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM07.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM08.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM09.jpg

The Kaleun who sinks her will earn the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds, plus their own chalet in the Bavarian Alps and command of the the first Type XXI when they are commissioned.

Kaleun1961
01-12-2008, 08:35 PM
Got this one in my email and thought some of you might like to get this baby lined up for a spread. She's empty in these pics; you can see that easily as the decks are bare and by how much of her hull is up out of the water, including the bulbous nose and props.

Text of the email and pics below:

This is how Wal-Mart gets all its stuff from China. Get a load of this ship!

15,000 containers and a 207' beam! And look at the small crew-size for a ship

longer than a US aircraft carrier (which has a complement of 5,000 men and

officers).

Think it's big enough? Notice that 207' beam means it was NOT designed for
the Panama or Suez Canal. It is strictly trans-pacific. Check out the
cruise speed: 31 knots means the goods arrive 4 days before the typical
container ship (18-20 knots) on a China-to-California run. So this
behemoth is hugely competitive carrying perishable goods.

This ship was built in three, or perhaps as many as five sections. The

sections floated together and then were welded. The ship is named

Emma Maersk. The command bridge is higher than a 10-story building

and has 11 crane rigs that can operate simultaneously.



Additional info:
Country of origin - Denmark
Length - 1,302 ft
Width - 207 ft
Net cargo - 123,200 tons
Engine - 14 in-line cylinders diesel engine (110,000 BHP) Cruise Speed - 31
knots, Cargo capacity - 15,000 TEU (1 TEU = 20 ft3 container)
Crew - 13 people First Trip - Sept. 08, 2006 Construction cost - US
$145,000,000+
Silicone painting applied to the ship bottom reduces water resistance and
saves 317,000 gallons of diesel per year .

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM01.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM02.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM03.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM04.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM05.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM06.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM07.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM08.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a299/K-61/Emma%20Maersk/EM09.jpg

The Kaleun who sinks her will earn the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds, plus their own chalet in the Bavarian Alps and command of the the first Type XXI when they are commissioned.

Liddabit
01-12-2008, 11:33 PM
How much fuel does that thing use?

Would it be too dangerous to nuclear power those like aircraft carriers are? That would save alot of fuel and greenhouse gases though wouldn't it?

HW3
01-12-2008, 11:58 PM
Which would be worse, greenhouse gases or spent nuclear fuel storage?

hueywolf123
01-13-2008, 01:12 AM
The 'Hogging', and 'Sagging' in rough weather must be something to see. There was a Youtube video of this in a standard container ship once, taken inside the hold facing for'd. It was extreme, in this, it would have you sleeping in the life boats.
Only thirteen crew? No wonder there are so many unofficial near-misses at sea. The draught must be huge, set your fish deep.

Realjambo
01-13-2008, 04:46 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif I'd hate to have to clean the thing!

Celeon999
01-13-2008, 05:07 AM
EUREKA !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


My eyes have seen the promised target ! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

klcarroll
01-13-2008, 05:14 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Which would be worse, greenhouse gases or spent nuclear fuel storage? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


I don't even buy into the whole "Global Warming" concept; .....And I would still rather deal spent fuel rod storage than the whole "fossil fuel" quagmire!

klcarroll

blastomatic1759
01-13-2008, 07:21 AM
everythings computer operated , which is why it has a small crew , my roommate told me that if a ship has a certain amount of crew members on it , its policy to keep a shipboard doctor , and since docs are fairly expensive .... another reason for a small crew. that thing is massive though , the biggest tow ive ever shoved was 1172 foot long. which wasnt but 5 barges long. just think of all those longshoremen its going to take to secure all those containers , and im with RJ on this , i would hate to clean it , or even paint it.

Kaiser_W
01-13-2008, 09:51 AM
It looks like it has an apartment building built on in the middle. That's quite generous for only thirteen people. They must have two people per floor or something.


As for the fuel question. There has been a nuclear powered transport ship in the past, but in todays world, a ship like that would only be a target. Either to get the rods or just destroy it in port.

It is a pirates dream prize though.

klcarroll
01-13-2008, 12:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">......but in todays world, a ship like that would only be a target. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sad: ....But very, very true!

klcarroll

M0ttie
01-13-2008, 01:56 PM
My brother was an engineering officer in the Merchant Navy on a bulk carrier.
Whilst most people realise the engine/s are big they dont realise how big sometimes.
When a decoke of the pistons was required the following procedure was implemented. Boiler suit and breathing protection was worn, you were wrapped in cloth and then hosed down. Whilst this was happening someone was taking an inspection hatch off the engine, or piston to be precise. The piston in question was set at its lowest point and in you climbed with an angle grinder.
You then stood on top of the piston in a still hot engine doing 360's with the grinder taking off the carbon ring!...
This was repeated for each piston until completed. Insurance requirements required this to be done at strictly set intervals and he said he'd actually done this whilst at Sea.
He also said the fuel they used wasn't like our idea of diesel fuel. it was a thick tar like oil that required heating up before being pumped at high pressure into the engines that were the size of semi detached houses. The pressure was such that had a fuel feeder pipe split the jet of heated oil was under sufficient pressure to seriously injure/kill you if it hit you.
How true the de-coking at sea story was or the fuel thing was I do not know, I'd have thought insurance would allow leeway for travelling to port to undertake such maintenance but this was related to me in my youth by a much older brother. I have no reason to doubt what he said but unfortunately I'd need a clairvoyant now to ask him to confirm.

Celeon999
01-13-2008, 02:08 PM
Another one from Maersk huh ?


The hunter has already spotted his prey and is shadowing it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif


http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/5741/papanikolisdarkhelmet0ylq8.png

Kaleun1961
01-13-2008, 02:41 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by hueywolf123:
The 'Hogging', and 'Sagging' in rough weather must be something to see. There was a Youtube video of this in a standard container ship once, taken inside the hold facing for'd. It was extreme, in this, it would have you sleeping in the life boats.
Only thirteen crew? No wonder there are so many unofficial near-misses at sea. The draught must be huge, set your fish deep. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

My retired captain friend spoke to me about this ship. Her draft, relative to her beam is surprisingly shallow, for a ship that big. It says in the email that she's too big for the Suez Canal, but her draft is shallow enough.

Aside from the safety/terrorism concerns, I think a nuclear propulsion system would be too expensive, to build, maintain and then dispose of at the end of its life. Hiring nuclear certified crew would up the costs. The efficiencies of intermodal transport are so huge, that the actual shipping costs per unit are very low. According to a documentary I recently watched, it is about 1% of the retail price of an electronic item like a DVD player. So, if you pay $100 for a deck, the cost of shipping it was only about a dollar. It boggles the mind, but we know it must be true, for we see the prices when we go to the stores, how all of these electronic goods plus 1,001 other items of useless plastic **** are shipped from China to the U.S and Europe. I really wouldn't know, because I have an almost religious aversion to WalMart. Yes, I have been inside one a few times, but I really hate the experience. Every time I see a Chinese label on a product, I imagine an unemployed American, Canadian or European.

PhantomKira
01-13-2008, 07:50 PM
Some information on the first nuclear powered merchant, NS Savannah, and a few others.

NS Savannah

https://voa.marad.dot.gov/images/ns_savannah.jpg


The First: NS Savannah (http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/savannah9.htm)

More info on NS SAVANNAH (https://voa.marad.dot.gov/programs/ns_savannah/index.asp)

Stamp Drawings of Savannah, and others (http://www.shipsonstamps.org/topics/html/atom.htm)