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View Full Version : If you have problem with missions try this....(4.10.1)



fabianfred
02-16-2011, 03:25 PM
After installing the new patch I found that I had problems with old DF (MDS) missions. Sometimes the planes never appeared or appeared crashed when before they were OK.
I tried opening the mission in the FMB then re-saving it (best to give it a new version name) after which it worked OK.

fabianfred
02-16-2011, 03:25 PM
After installing the new patch I found that I had problems with old DF (MDS) missions. Sometimes the planes never appeared or appeared crashed when before they were OK.
I tried opening the mission in the FMB then re-saving it (best to give it a new version name) after which it worked OK.

M2morris
02-17-2011, 12:19 AM
Good tip.
I will probably use that.
Also, I am trying to figure out how I am going to transfer my IL2 1946 to my new PC with all the tracks and missions going with it.

EJGrOst_Caspar
02-17-2011, 02:11 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M2morris:

Also, I am trying to figure out how I am going to transfer my IL2 1946 to my new PC with all the tracks and missions going with it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Simply put the whole folder onto an USB stick or a DVD and copy it to the new rig - the game doesn't need registry entries to run (you could even run it from an USB stick then). http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

fabianfred
02-17-2011, 05:44 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M2morris:
Good tip.
I will probably use that.
Also, I am trying to figure out how I am going to transfer my IL2 1946 to my new PC with all the tracks and missions going with it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Put your old HDD drive in your new com as a backup drive and play from the old place.

M2morris
02-17-2011, 01:00 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by EJGrOst_Caspar:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M2morris:

Also, I am trying to figure out how I am going to transfer my IL2 1946 to my new PC with all the tracks and missions going with it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Simply put the whole folder onto an USB stick or a DVD and copy it to the new rig - the game doesn't need registry entries to run (you could even run it from an USB stick then). http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
That's one thing I thought of doing but I figured I'd run into some kind of copywrite trouble. So it will work then. Hmm okay.
I have a removable 2Gig memory chip I was going to try to use. Wow. Sounds too easy.

@fabianfred
Your suggestion sounds good too. I didn't know I could do that. 2 hard drives in my new PC?

LEBillfish
02-17-2011, 01:32 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M2morris:
@fabianfred
Your suggestion sounds good too. I didn't know I could do that. 2 hard drives in my new PC? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

???....I'm running 4 HDDs and each broken up to 3-4 partitions. OS on one partition, programs another, IL2 another, etc..

K2

VW-IceFire
02-17-2011, 04:31 PM
You can have as many hard drives in your computer as you have room/SATA connectors.

I know people running dual RAID configurations which means four physical hard drives working in combination.

And yep, IL-2, unlike most software, is fantastically simple and doesn't need a lot of fancy registry keys (on normal install it creates just one) to operate properly. Everything is driven from within the game directory. So just copy the whole thing over and it's gold.

M2morris
02-17-2011, 04:57 PM
I was clueless about multiple HDs and partitioning until today.
I read about it.
I went, I saw, and it was good. This forum is full of knowledgeable and informative people. My cup almost runneth-over http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif (my cup is cracked here and there)
I will have to leave the old PC in tact for community use in the house
but I have a brand new 500gb HD that will be going into my new man-cave rig in the back den. I should think about partitioning.

EJGrOst_Caspar
02-18-2011, 02:25 AM
There are still shortcomings with many HDs though, one is the temperature in your PC - it goes up a bit due to less good airflow, and the other is the power needed... each of the components in your PC needs power, especially the video card, HDs and optical drives. So make sure, that your power pack is sufficient for more equipment.

Actual new PCs should already have a proper power pack, however... I have made bad experiences with this topic. Better doublecheck. ;-)

fabianfred
02-18-2011, 01:38 PM
If new com has one nice big HDD then partition it.
open the sides of new and old com.
place old com facing new com.
run a flat red cable from the mainboard of new com to the old com HDD
copy data across to partition.....(The whole Ubi folder)
create new shortcut to desktop of il2.exe

do all connecting/unconnecting whilst coms are off and unplugged

mortoma
02-21-2011, 05:59 PM
I have never understood why people partition. Instead I have lots of hard drives and use two Kingwin swappable hard drive bays. And on top of that I have two Thermaltake BlackX external docking stations ( later model with external SATA ) and use ESATA to hook them up and can put in any of several 1TB drives in those and even my laptop drives if I take a few minutes to remove them. I have not one single drive with a partition on it except for my two laptop drives which have a special partition from HP for backing up data, which comes like that from the factory. And with external SATA drives hooked up, you don't have the extra heat problem that some are whining about. Plus they have their own plug in power adaptor which don't use power from your rig. I hate partitioning. No use for it at all. I also have two huge 64 gig thumb drives. And am getting more and more SSDs as time goes by.

LEBillfish
02-21-2011, 08:05 PM
Ever see how a program is scattered over a drive?..Well, I'll save myself some typing....

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning

Creating more than one partition has the following advantages:

Separation of the operating system (OS) and program files from user files. This allows image backups (or clones) to be made of only the operating system and installed software.

Having an area for operating system virtual memory swapping/paging.

Keeping frequently used programs and data near each other.

Having cache and log files separate from other files. These can change size dynamically and rapidly, potentially making a file system full.

Use of multi-boot setups, which allow users to have more than one operating system on a single computer. For example, one could install GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows or others on different partitions of the same hard disk and have a choice of booting into any compatible operating system at power-up.

Protecting or isolating files, to make it easier to recover a corrupted file system or operating system installation. If one partition is corrupted, none of the other file systems are affected, and the drive's data may still be salvageable. Having a separate partition for read-only data also reduces the chances of the file system on this partition becoming corrupted.

Raising overall computer performance on systems where smaller file systems are more efficient. For instance, large hard drives with only one NTFS file system typically have a very large sequentially accessed Master File Table (MFT) and it generally takes more time to read this MFT than the smaller MFTs of smaller partitions.

"Short Stroking", which aims to minimize performance-eating head repositioning delays by reducing the number of tracks used per hard drive.[1] The basic idea is that you make one partition approx. 20-25% of the total size of the drive. This partition is expected to: occupy the outer tracks of the hard drive, and offer more than double the throughput less than half the access time. If you limit capacity with short stroking, the minimum throughput stays much closer to the maximum.
For example a 1 TB disk might have an access time of 12 ms at 200 IOPS (at a limited queue depth) with an average throughput of 100 MB/s. When it is partitioned to 100 GB (and the rest left unallocated) you might end up with an access time of 6 ms at 300 IOPS (with a bigger queue depth) with an average throughput of 200 MB/s..

K2

M2morris
02-22-2011, 05:05 PM
LEBillfish:
What partitioning software did you use?
When would I make the partitions on a brand new HD? It seems to me it would have to be 'before' any OS is installed. Is that right?

LEBillfish
02-22-2011, 06:36 PM
Well I have always been partial to Western Digital, and there is software included that allows you to determine partitions on the initial set up....I would assume most have that as well.

Though recently I wanted to do a partition space shift from one to another which can iffy be done with aftermarket software like partition magic, I've never found much use for buying a $50 program for the rare instances I'd use it.

.......and yes, you'll typically set partitions before anything is on the drive.

K2

fabianfred
02-24-2011, 03:52 AM
using windows I partition a new HDD with the
menu/programs/administative tools/computer management
then the Disc management under Storage page.
If the first HDD in a new com then do it in another com first.

M2morris
03-09-2011, 04:17 PM
Well, my build went pretty good after all. I finished it today.
This may seem like not such a big deal to most of you but I am blown-away by how well my graphics are now. I can't believe how beautiful the game is. I should have done this years ago.
I installed windows7 today, then the drivers for my graphics card and the M board. I installed a straight IL2 1946 and put landscape settings on perfect and it flew smoothly and nice. I haven't even messed with anything yet because I have to go to work. Hell I might call-in.
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/IMG_0079.jpg
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/IMG_0085.jpg
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/100_6225.jpg
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/100_6227.jpg
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/grab0003-4.jpg

M2morris
03-15-2011, 11:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by fabianfred:
If new com has one nice big HDD then partition it.
open the sides of new and old com.
place old com facing new com.
run a flat red cable from the mainboard of new com to the old com HDD
copy data across to partition.....(The whole Ubi folder)
create new shortcut to desktop of il2.exe

do all connecting/unconnecting whilst coms are off and unplugged </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I just finished transferring HSFX from the(this)old hard drive to my new computer by doing almost what you said to do. Since I couldn't find any DV RWs that could hold 9.8GB and I didn't want to spend forty bucks on a big memory stick I decided to unplug the new PCs DVD drive and use those SATA and power cables for the old HD from the old PC. I removed it and laid it next to the new PC, plugged it in, and started up the new PC. I was able to copy over anything I wanted to. That was cool, and way too easy. Not even any left-over screws. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

mortoma
03-16-2011, 11:41 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LEBillfish:
Ever see how a program is scattered over a drive?..Well, I'll save myself some typing....

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Disk_partitioning

Creating more than one partition has the following advantages:

Separation of the operating system (OS) and program files from user files. This allows image backups (or clones) to be made of only the operating system and installed software.

Having an area for operating system virtual memory swapping/paging.

Keeping frequently used programs and data near each other.

Having cache and log files separate from other files. These can change size dynamically and rapidly, potentially making a file system full.

Use of multi-boot setups, which allow users to have more than one operating system on a single computer. For example, one could install GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows or others on different partitions of the same hard disk and have a choice of booting into any compatible operating system at power-up.

Protecting or isolating files, to make it easier to recover a corrupted file system or operating system installation. If one partition is corrupted, none of the other file systems are affected, and the drive's data may still be salvageable. Having a separate partition for read-only data also reduces the chances of the file system on this partition becoming corrupted.

Raising overall computer performance on systems where smaller file systems are more efficient. For instance, large hard drives with only one NTFS file system typically have a very large sequentially accessed Master File Table (MFT) and it generally takes more time to read this MFT than the smaller MFTs of smaller partitions.

"Short Stroking", which aims to minimize performance-eating head repositioning delays by reducing the number of tracks used per hard drive.[1] The basic idea is that you make one partition approx. 20-25% of the total size of the drive. This partition is expected to: occupy the outer tracks of the hard drive, and offer more than double the throughput less than half the access time. If you limit capacity with short stroking, the minimum throughput stays much closer to the maximum.
For example a 1 TB disk might have an access time of 12 ms at 200 IOPS (at a limited queue depth) with an average throughput of 100 MB/s. When it is partitioned to 100 GB (and the rest left unallocated) you might end up with an access time of 6 ms at 300 IOPS (with a bigger queue depth) with an average throughput of 200 MB/s..

K2 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>You can do all of that by using separate HDs, some of them small and by using separate SSD drives. I have small drives, large drives and SSD drives. Really for gaming the idea is to get the whole of the executable data ( running program ) and all of the extra data for graphics and sound loaded onto the ram anyway. Which most of us do whether we know it or not in the case of IL2. Of course the running program has to all go into the ram memory or a program would not run. And if you have enough ram, then all of the needed data for the program will get loaded into ram too. Of course when you start up a particular mission, then the specific data files for the map and the data for it are also loaded up into ram too. Partitioning might help a little with that too but you are talking mere seconds difference. Hardly worth it. When I start an offline mission up, it only takes about 5 seconds to load into the ram and start going. I'm talking about what happens after you click on the "Fly" button. If I did some fancy partitioning, I might get it to four seconds, big hairy deal!! You just have to know something about computers, which apparently you do not, at least not much.

The advantages of partitioned data on drives doesn't help much with all of the stuff mentioned in that article you posted for games. Except it might load up faster when you start up the game in the first place to get everything from the hard drive/s to the RAM memory. Bottom line, if you have enough ram and your entire program and game data files get loaded into the ram, once the game starts nothing concerning the hard drives matters any more until you stop the game and do something else.

I have been building computers for over 15 years and have a degree in computer technology and have worked for IBM and other high tech companies. I already pretty much knew everything in that article anyway. But I just don't think hyper partitioning is really what it's cracked up to be in the real world. Any hard drive problems I have had ( which are few ) would have destroyed all partitions on a particular disk, so multiple partitions would have never done me any good for preserving data. I've had two incidents of entire hard drives failing due to power surges. They were not partitioned but if they would have been all partitions would have been lost anyway. The partition tables were toasted! A RAID array might have helped in those cases but I don't particularly like RAID. And we are not talking RAID here, we are talking about basic partitioning. The paging file tricks mentioned in the article that you can do with partitioning might help some with the basic OS performance but help little if at all for secondary programs like games and such.