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midgie
06-13-2005, 01:53 PM
Hi,

I've seen the expression flying rhubarbs over the channel mentioned a couple of times but have no idea what it means or where it comes from. Can anyone enlighten me?

I tried googling but only got recipes for crumble and advice not to eat the leaves.

midgie
06-13-2005, 01:53 PM
Hi,

I've seen the expression flying rhubarbs over the channel mentioned a couple of times but have no idea what it means or where it comes from. Can anyone enlighten me?

I tried googling but only got recipes for crumble and advice not to eat the leaves.

9th_Spitin
06-13-2005, 02:01 PM
MMMmmmmm Rhubarb Pie.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/kbbrech/fk.jpg

Capt.England
06-13-2005, 02:02 PM
This is what it means, plus a couple of more code names for fighter ops.

Rhubarbs were attacks aganist opportunity targets on the ground.
Roadsteads were anti-shipping strikes.
Circus was the code name for fighter sweeps (Anti-Air strikes).

I hope that helps sort out some of the code names for people who want to make R.A.F. briefings more realistic.

midgie
06-13-2005, 02:05 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Capt.England:
This is what it means, plus a couple of more code names for fighter ops.

Rhubarbs were attacks aganist opportunity targets on the ground.
Roadsteads were anti-shipping strikes.
Circus was the code name for fighter sweeps (Anti-Air strikes).

I hope that helps sort out some of the code names for people who want to make R.A.F. briefings more realistic. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks, obvious once you know.

midgie
06-13-2005, 02:06 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by 9th_Spitin:
MMMmmmmm Rhubarb Pie.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v240/kbbrech/fk.jpg </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

that makes me wish i'd never asked http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

9th_Spitin
06-13-2005, 02:08 PM
We have custom fit cockpits.

VW-IceFire
06-13-2005, 02:36 PM
Rhubarb is a codename for operations undertaken by the RAF from 1941 and on. It was part of the "Leaning Forward into France" policy.

From Squadron Signal (Spitfire):
Rhubarb - Small scale attacks by fighters or fighter bombers
Circus - Heavy escort to light bombers acting as bait
Ramrod - Similar to Circus except bombers were meant to attack a target
Roadstead - Attack by bombers on shipping (with fighter escort)
Rodeo - Fighter sweep over enemy territory (usually France)
Ranger - Freelance penetration in squadron or wing strength

Rhubarbs were known to be particularly dangerous as they were usually flown in low level sweeps. Typical Rhubarb aircraft were the Typhoon, Spitfire LF.V, and Spitfire XII, Mustang (of all types), and Mosqutio. Infact, it was the Rhubarb and the Typhoons proficiency at it which saved the fighter from cancellation.

AerialTarget
06-13-2005, 02:39 PM
The term comes from the aicraft having been so low that they brushed the tops of the rhubarb. I'm not quite sure whether or not this is literal.

Capt.England
06-13-2005, 03:52 PM
Also used, Whirlwind's fitted with bomb rack's.

snafu73
06-13-2005, 04:03 PM
The RAF was very well stocked with custard thanks to their American friends but they kept running out of Rhubarb so they used to fly over to France to pick some up every once in a while.

It's true.

Waldo.Pepper
06-14-2005, 01:38 PM
My turn

Rhubarb: an offensive operation for a section of two aircraft. The essential (hoped for) requirement for this operation was solid low-level cloud cover over the target area to give the section somewhere to hide on the flight home if the opposition became too intense. Targets were usually the enemy's transportation system: lock gates, trains, railway yards, barges, small ships, dock installations, and other targets of opportunity, always with the proviso that the well-being of the French populace would be kept in mind. It was, in short, a dash across the Channel for a shoot-em-up and then a dash home €" hoping to avoid any fighters that had been stirred up by nipping into the cloud.

Ramrod: usually a squadron -strength, low-level operation with additional fighters along for cover and to add to the sound and fury of an attack on a larger target such as an airfield or port installation.

Ranger, similar to a Rhubarb, but usually at night in flight or squadron strength €" with aircraft operating singly to cover a wide area.

Roadstead: similar to a Ramrod but with a shipping convoy as target.

Dive-bombing (no code name): a full squadron operation usually against airfields. In the early days of the war, as our strength grew, there was a concerted attempt to draw the Luftwaffe into the air and establish a high rate of attrition.