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View Full Version : Another Lonely Eagle.. The Obit thread



Bearcat99
03-19-2006, 01:23 PM
Received word today from Col McGee that...

Theodore Wilson joined the Lonely Eagles Chapter on
March 15, 2006.
LtCol T. A. Wilson was a member class 43 F
(same class as Col. McGee).

A member of the William Campbell Chapter and
Tuskegee Airmen, Incorporated life member number 68,
Lt. Col Wilson had been ill for several months. He was buried today.

Bearcat99
03-19-2006, 01:23 PM
Received word today from Col McGee that...

Theodore Wilson joined the Lonely Eagles Chapter on
March 15, 2006.
LtCol T. A. Wilson was a member class 43 F
(same class as Col. McGee).

A member of the William Campbell Chapter and
Tuskegee Airmen, Incorporated life member number 68,
Lt. Col Wilson had been ill for several months. He was buried today.

Targ
03-19-2006, 01:32 PM
RIP
and god speed

DocD1960
03-19-2006, 02:12 PM
RIP

TC_Stele
03-19-2006, 02:15 PM
RIP. Many respects.

flakwagen
03-19-2006, 02:38 PM
RIP and godspeed to him. WW2 vets are going fast these days. I have one grandfather left. After him there will be no more war vets in the family.

Jatro13th
03-19-2006, 03:16 PM
RIP

Gold_Monkey
03-19-2006, 03:56 PM
Salute to another warrior that has passed on. RIP S!

danjama
03-19-2006, 07:12 PM
im literally at the point where i dont know what to say anymore, hence my delayed reply

May his soul rest well http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

T_O_A_D
03-19-2006, 08:15 PM
Yep I feel the same way Dan, They are leaving every day now it seems.

God Speed and Salute to another!

wayno7777
03-19-2006, 09:14 PM
~S~ and Godspeed....

Bearcat99
03-19-2006, 09:36 PM
I dont want to make this a sticky but I think at this rate we can keep bumping it if we get more news about any WWII pilot passing on.

willyvic
03-19-2006, 09:58 PM
Russell D. McNair of Kenilworth, 86, recipient of Distinguished Flying Cross. March 17, 2006.

"A first lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II, he flew 30 missions with the Eighth Air Force, 466 Bomb Group. After his tour in England, he was assigned as a flight instructor at the Hondo Air Force Base in Texas.

He was a recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross and an Air Medal with four Oak Leaf Clusters. In 2001, he was honored with the New Jersey Distinguished Service Medal.

Mr. McNair was a charter member of the 466 Bomb Group Association, where he had been a member since 1987 and served as its secretary treasurer for many years. A life-member of the Mighty Eighth Air Force Historical Association, he was also a member of the Distinguished Flying Cross Society, San Diego Chapter"


Bear, I wholeheartedly support this idea. But perhaps a sticky would be better. We can add to it as the need arises. A running honorarium so to speak.

WV.

_VR_ScorpionWorm
03-19-2006, 10:16 PM
~S~

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

stathem
03-20-2006, 04:12 AM
If this is the Obit thread...I take it it's not just for the US Eagles.

Wing Commander 'Bunny' Currant, died 12th March(Age 95), 13 kill BoB ace and all round good egg.

Daily Telegraph Obituary (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2006/03/20/db2001.xml)

Thanks for all our todays.

Bearcat99
03-20-2006, 06:05 AM
Nope.... as long as they werent of the Rhinehard Heydrich variety of German soldier it is fine with me... after all we are celebrating these men and these planes everytime we boot up.... and this is an international forum.. and the war was over 60 years ago. If the men who fought it and watched thier friends die and tried thier best to kill each other and survive can shake hands and discuss this like people then I see no reason why we cant.

HotelBushranger
03-20-2006, 06:28 AM
Pardon my ignorance, but what was so bad about the Rhinehart Germans?

Bearcat99
03-20-2006, 07:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
Pardon my ignorance, but what was so bad about the Rhinehart Germans? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As in "The man entrusted with implementing Hitler decision to eradicate the Jewish population of Europe was Himmler's deputy - "Rheinhard Heydrich". He was intimately connected with all phases of the Final Solution; he created the master plan, organized the ghettos, trained and supervised the Einsatzgrouppen, he was in charge of the resettlement of the Jews to the gas chambers."

My mistake on the spelling.... I have corrected it.

stathem
03-21-2006, 01:45 AM
He also reputedly flew some combat missions in Russia, but thankfully his Obituary is long since written.

stathem
03-21-2006, 04:28 AM
Air-Vice Marshal Kevin Parker, RAAF. Died 18th March 2006. No Obituary yet.

WW2 Roll call. (http://www.ww2roll.gov.au/script/veteran_certificate.asp?VeteranID=1081193)

danjama
03-21-2006, 06:33 PM
bump

danjama
03-22-2006, 01:37 PM
Goodbye and Godspeed to Pierre Clostermann

Rest in peace Pierre Salute!

Bearcat99
03-31-2006, 03:36 PM
Make those airshows boys...... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif


I just heard that OTA Maxwell Honemond, of Washington, DC, a liaison pilot with the Tuskegee Airmen, passed away this morning, March 31, 2006.
I recall that his wife passed away about a year ago.
Mr. Honemond will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, however, as of today, no definite plans have been made.

Esel1964
03-31-2006, 06:37 PM
Barring those of the Heydrich/Goering ilk,may they all fly on in the heavens.

It's up to folks like us to keep them flying here in spirit.

Bearcat99
04-01-2006, 06:15 AM
Yesterday morning. The Honorable George L. Brown was born on July 1, 1926 in Lawrence Kansas. During World War II, he served as a Tuskegee Airman, and was a member of class 45 E. In 1955, Brown made history when he was elected to the Colorado House of Representatives. He served as a state senator for eighteen years.
In 1974, he was elected lieutenanat governor, a position he held for four years.

Bearcat99
04-04-2006, 05:50 AM
I took this quote from March 14th and locked the original thread.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bearcat99:
This morning Bob Brown joined the Lonely Eagles Squadron at 12:20 a.m. He was recovering from a second stroke at the Atlanta VA Medical Center. More details will be forwarded as received.


<span class="ev_code_RED">~!</span><span class="ev_code_WHITE">S</span><span class="ev_code_BLUE">!~</span> </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

stelr
04-04-2006, 08:29 AM
Per your request Bearcat, below is the story re-posted from a separate thread. This guy was a hero several times over.

This man's story is incredible. S!



Release

Public Affairs Office

Building 115, Shamrock Street Phone (334) 255-2252

Fort Rucker, AL 36362 Fax (334) 255-1004



Date: 2 Apr 2006

For more information: 334-255-2252



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE



It is with great sadness that the Army Aviation Warfighting Center announces the loss of a great Army Aviation hero, Medal of Honor recipient CW4 (Ret.) Michael J. Novosel. Mr Novosel died on 2april 2006 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center after an extended illness.

He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism on October 2, 1969. Novosel received word of wounded South Vietnamese soldiers pinned down by a large enemy force. Flying without air cover, he encountered ground fire so intense it forced him away six times. Courageously, he completed 15 hazardous extractions. On the last, just as a wounded soldier was pulled into the aircraft, the enemy unleashed a hail of fire directly at Novosel. Wounded, he momentarily lost control of the aircraft, but recovered and flew to safety. In all, he saved 29 men. He was nominated for and later received the Congressional Medal of Honor for these actions.

In March 1970, a UH-1 helicopter piloted by Novosel's son was shot down. The senior Novosel heard the "Mayday" call from 15 minutes away. With assurance from the aircraft commander that his son's crew had survived the crash and found shelter, Novosel completed his own mission before flying to their aid. The younger Novosel returned the favor seven days later when his father was shot down. Just 19 at the time, Mike Jr. flew to his father's rescue.

While Novosel's heroism as a combat pilot is well documented in the Army Aviation community, he will be remembered to many as a soft spoken gentleman who, even in retirement, made himself available to lecture at the Warrant Officer Career College and he also became a Senior Tactical Adviser in the Warrant Officer Candidate Program at Fort Rucker.

The Aviation Soldiers serving throughout the world express their deepest sympathy to Mr. Novosel's family.

"CW4 Mike Novosel was an extraordinary patriot who showed all Americans what it means to serve. He was an incredibly genuine person, who loved to talk with the generations of Soldier Aviators who followed about what it means to truly put your life on the line for one another and to never leave a fallen comrade behind. His gallantry and loyalty to his fellow Soldiers is an example we will all strive to live up to. His loss is felt not only by his family and the Army Aviation community, but by all those who knew and loved him," said Brig. Gen. E. J. Sinclair, Commander, U.S. Army Aviation Warfighting Center.



"I first met Mike Novosel as a brand new Army aviator. I was in awe of his bravery and the stories I had heard, but what inspired me at the time, and what has stayed with me all these years, was Mike's quiet, matter-of-fact, "follow-me" example. Chief Novosel was the type of man who is just as heroic in the classroom and in the hangar and in the club and walking the flight line as he is on the battlefield. When I last saw Mike he was at Walter Reed, clearly ailing, but making his way amongst the wards visiting our injured Soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan. Sometimes the soldiering defines the man -- in Mike's case, the character of the man defined what it means to be a Soldier. He will be missed by his entire extended Army family, and me personally," said Gen Richard Cody, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army.



Biographical Information



Born September 3, 1922 and raised in Etna, Pa., Novosel became an aviation cadet in the U.S. Army Air Forces when he was 19 years old. After earning his commission and pilot wings on December 15, 1942, he instructed in the North American AT-6 Texan at Laredo Army Air Field, Texas. By December 1944, Novosel had logged more than 800 hours in the Consolidated B-24 Liberator supporting aerial gunner training. Then, he went to Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama, to qualify in the Boeing B-29 Superfortress.

In July 1945, following crew training in New Mexico, Novosel left for Tinian Island in the Pacific where he flew four combat missions with the 58th Bombardment Wing (Very Heavy). After the end of World War II, he flew two missions to drop food to Allied prisoners of war in Japan. During the Japanese surrender ceremony on the USS Missouri, Novosel commanded a B-29 in a 462-ship fly-over. He then took command of the 99th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) and remained in the Pacific until the fall of 1947.

Following his service in World War II he was assigned to Eglin AFB, Florida, where he was a B-29 test pilot. In 1949, Novosel left active duty and joined the Air Force Reserve. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War, at the grade of Major and attended the Air Command and Staff School.

Novosel was promoted to Lt. Col. with the Air Force Reserve in 1964 and requested active duty for service during the Vietnam War. When informed that the Air Force was over-strength in its senior grades, he vacated his position with the Air Force Reserves and accepted an appointment as a Warrant Officer Aviator with the U.S. Army.

Returning to combat as a "dustoff" (medivac) helicopter pilot, he served two tours in South Vietnam, flying 2,543 missions in the Bell UH-1 Huey while airlifting nearly 5,600 medical evacuees.

On October 2, 1969, Novosel received word of wounded South Vietnamese soldiers pinned down by a large enemy force. Flying without air cover, he encountered ground fire so intense it forced him away six times. Courageously, he completed 15 hazardous extractions. On the last, just as a wounded soldier was pulled into the aircraft, the enemy unleashed a hail of fire directly at Novosel. Wounded, he momentarily lost control of the aircraft, but recovered and flew to safety. In all, he saved 29 men. He was nominated for and later received the Congressional Medal of Honor for these actions.

In March 1970, a UH-1 helicopter piloted by Novosel's son was shot down. The senior Novosel heard the "Mayday" call from 15 minutes away. With assurance from the aircraft commander that his son's crew had survived the crash and found shelter, Novosel completed his own mission before flying to their aid. The younger Novosel returned the favor seven days later when his father was shot down. Just 19 at the time, Mike Jr. flew to his father's rescue.

Following his heroic service in Vietnam, he served 3 years at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, as chief pilot for the Army's Golden Knights parachute team. On occasion, he jumped with the team to maintain proficiency.

Novosel's next assignment was at Fort Rucker where he was an author and lecturer at the Warrant Officer Career College until 1976. An assignment in Korea as the Second Infantry Division's Aviation Safety Officer followed. In May 1983, Novosel was assigned new duties as the Aviation Center Senior Training, Advising and Counseling (TAC) Officer with the Warrant Officer Candidate Program.

At the time of his retirement on February 28, 1985, Novosel was the last active duty military aviator on flight status who had flown combat missions in World War II. Known as the "Dean of the Dustoff Pilots" Novosel was an aviator on flight status for more than 42 years. He accumulated 12,400 hours of military flying time of which 2,038 were flown in combat.

stathem
04-04-2006, 09:11 AM
Bit late this one, I missed the edition of the paper it was in. I know it was noted extensively here, bvut for completion,

Pierre Clostermann's Obit from the Daily Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2006/03/25/db2501.xml)

georgeo76
04-04-2006, 05:05 PM
Not an aviator, but remarkable.

Desmond T. Doss (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12152446/from/RS.5/) was the only Conscientious objector awarded the Medal of Honor.

wayno7777
04-04-2006, 07:43 PM
~S~ and Godspeed, Mike.

He left Ft. Rucker just before I got there. We heard a lot about him.
His book is a must read.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/Novosel.jpg
DUSTOFF
326 pages with photos.
Only available direct from
Presidio Press, 505B San Marin Drive, Suite 160, Novato, CA, 94945-1340
Phone: (415) 898-1081, ext 18

My bird, Dustoff 924
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v224/wayno77/FB%20shots/Aircraft/Army_69-15924.jpg

Bearcat99
04-04-2006, 10:41 PM
Thanks steir... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

WWMaxGunz
04-05-2006, 07:37 AM
IMO the lonely ones are the ones still alive.

Somewhere is a table in Valhalla where the others meet together.

Interminate
04-05-2006, 08:26 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Bearcat99:
Nope.... as long as they werent of the Rhinehard Heydrich variety of German soldier it is fine with me... QUOTE]

precisely this attitude is the reason I would shun some sentimental thread like this. Black pilots would have received more respect in Germany by the way. I only respect these pilots in their ability to fly well, not in their ability to shoot down Germans on behalf of some lame US government who didn't even repect them as people. Furthermore it renders their mission rather ridiculous.

Rjel
04-07-2006, 10:59 AM
Reposted here............

Col. Fred J. Christensen died Tuesday at the age of 84. He was featured in a short article recently
http://www.aqppublishing.com/pubs/Minuteman06spring.pdf

There can't be many top scoring aces from the 56th left..... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

stathem
04-10-2006, 04:53 AM
On 9th March 2006, Aged 92, Wing Commmander Tom Baker (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2006/04/10/db1001.xml), a first class Navigator who survived 2 tours on Blenhiems in 1940/41, shot down and made PoW over Schipol in 1942.

92 is a great innings, but then surviving that long on Blenheims at that time, he certainly deserved it.

S! to one of the unsung heroes of the Battle of Britain.

stathem
05-30-2006, 05:16 AM
From Friday,

Lt-Cmr John Wellham (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/1361014744)

stathem
05-30-2006, 05:18 AM
A big one, Battle of France and RAF Wing
Commander, Ace of 312 Squadron,

Frantisek Perina. (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;jsessionid=5ZXXE13G14FLJQFIQMGSFFOAVCBQ WIV0?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2006/05/30/db3002.xml)

Thanks for all our freedoms. RIP.

S!

Bearcat99
05-30-2006, 07:19 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Interminate:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Bearcat99:
Nope.... as long as they werent of the Rhinehard Heydrich variety of German soldier it is fine with me... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

precisely this attitude is the reason I would shun some sentimental thread like this. Black pilots would have received more respect in Germany by the way. I only respect these pilots in their ability to fly well, not in their ability to shoot down Germans on behalf of some lame US government who didn't even repect them as people. Furthermore it renders their mission rather ridiculous. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Since this post is over a month old I was going to ignore it... however I just cant....

You miss the point.... ENTIRELY...

The Airmen were fighting for thier country too just as the other Americas were (In spite of the way they were treated thius was and still is HOME.) in fact just as many of the German pilots were.... which is why I made the statement about the rabid Nazi Heydrich variety of German soldier... If you sympathise with him at all then that says more about your mindset than anything I could ever say and any debate is rendered unneccessary... and this isnt the place for it anyway. However considering your atement about the tratment of Airmen in Germany.... I suggest a few links:

Blacks in WWII Germany 1 (http://www.holocaust-history.org/questions/blacks.shtml)
Blacks in WWI Germany 2 (http://german.about.com/od/culture/a/blackhistger_2.htm)

If you wish to take this discussion further please send me a PT as this thread iasnot the place for it.

Slickun
05-30-2006, 08:51 AM
I was gonna post about my dear departed Father, veteran fighter pilot of three wars, who passed last year, but this thread is no longer the place for it.