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View Full Version : a pretty good question about the fuel tank..



ysydor201988
12-21-2008, 03:16 AM
Hy i was escorting 4 B25 one day and i know that those planes can go very high altitudes so i took the 90 gal fuel tank(spitfire) but when i was returning i wanted to detach the fuel tank to lose weight.The question is:is there an indicator that shows me that the fuel in the tank(90gal fuel tank)is finishing?so i can dethach it?i flew about 1 hour with it but the indicator was the same(without dethaching it) i was wondering:if the indicator fals(with the tank fuel on)it means that the fuel of the tank is about to finish or the fuel that u have on the plane i can't understand this but it's an important fact u must calcolate your time up there...pls rispond thx..

ysydor201988
12-21-2008, 03:16 AM
Hy i was escorting 4 B25 one day and i know that those planes can go very high altitudes so i took the 90 gal fuel tank(spitfire) but when i was returning i wanted to detach the fuel tank to lose weight.The question is:is there an indicator that shows me that the fuel in the tank(90gal fuel tank)is finishing?so i can dethach it?i flew about 1 hour with it but the indicator was the same(without dethaching it) i was wondering:if the indicator fals(with the tank fuel on)it means that the fuel of the tank is about to finish or the fuel that u have on the plane i can't understand this but it's an important fact u must calcolate your time up there...pls rispond thx..

Kernow
12-21-2008, 03:58 AM
No, there's no indication for the external tank (on any aircraft AFAIK). It should just about double your endurance, as - off the top of my head - the internal tank on the Spit took 88 gals. You'll know the external tank is empty when the fuel gauge starts to drop, as that means fuel is now being drawn from the internal tank.

ysydor201988
12-21-2008, 09:24 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kernow:
No, there's no indication for the external tank (on any aircraft AFAIK). It should just about double your endurance, as - off the top of my head - the internal tank on the Spit took 88 gals. You'll know the external tank is empty when the fuel gauge starts to drop, as that means fuel is now being drawn from the internal tank. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


so i was...right...but in the stuka did u saw that the indicator it's never going down?

Zeus-cat
12-21-2008, 09:58 AM
Some aircraft have fuel gauges that only show how much fuel you have when you drop below a certain point. For example, the gauges will read full from 100% all the way down to 25%. Once you drop below 25% they gauges start dropping. I forget which planes these are, but I would guess some of the Russian planes are like this. I forget the exact percentages too.

As Kernow has said, I don't think any of the planes with drop tanks show the fuel level in them.

Many of the planes in this sim can fly for hours and most missions for the game do not last that long so drop tanks are not really needed. A "trick" people use is to take 25% fuel AND a drop tank for fighters. As soon as you see the enemy drop your tank and you should still have enough fuel to fight and get home. But your aicraft has only 25% fuel so it is lighter and will dogfight better.

Kernow
12-21-2008, 03:34 PM
Some aircraft, like Spit or 109 had one gauge and one tank. In these it seems the gauge tells you what you have left.

In others there were multiple tanks, but only one gauge, which could be switched to show the contents of any tank. Obviously the gauge only needs to measure the max that could be in any one tank. The game doesn't allow you to select tanks, so I guess those aircraft are the ones which only register the last x% of fuel.

Taking the Stuka as an example, it seems that 25% equates to 200 l, which is about the point the gauge starts to read. At cruise power the game-Stuka burns 200 l/hr (and cruises at about 300 kph TAS, or 5 km/min).

The Tempest does have a gauge for each tank, but they don't always make much sense. All the fuel in the Tempest is accounted for on the gauges, yet they only start to drop at around 65%. In others, like the 109, the gauge does work in a linear fashion to accurately reflect how much fuel remains.

Crikey2008
12-21-2008, 05:28 PM
AFAIK the aircraft will read the wing or fuselage tanks before it reads any attached tank. If so, and you drop the attached tank before the engine accesses it there will be no fuel reading for the attached tank and no variation in the fuel reading the pilot is receiving on the fuel gauge(s).

In some aircraft when you jettison the attached tank you can hear the attached tank uncouple...but I've never heard that in the Spit

WTE_Galway
12-21-2008, 05:49 PM
Bit of useless trivia

- the fuel gauges in the Yaks were in the top of the tank near the filler and the pilot looked out of the cockpit at the wing to read them (no these gauges are not modeled in IL2)

- the gauges were notoriously unreliable and some VVS squadrons deliberately painted over them forcing the pilot to use the old fashioned liters/minute calculations to estimate endurance remaining as "no fuel gauge at all is preferable to a faulty one" .

LEBillfish
12-21-2008, 06:05 PM
This was mentioned before by Oleg, the specifics lost to me save one aspect....That being drop tanks registering on the gauges, in fact if I recall correctly at one time, drop tanks and fixed tanks drained at the same time in the sim. So though you had drop tanks, it might be like draining off a huge 150% single tank, then losing the drop tanks when ejected on top of it......IOW....wrong, yet best they could do.

In reality, and using the Ki-61-I-Ko as an example, other planes may vairy, It had a Fuselage Tank, 3 wing tanks, plus the two massive drop tanks. You could switch from tank to tank at your leisure, in fact that one of it's initial issues as solenoids had problems so switch to a full tank, and suddenly be empty it refusing to do so....In any case, the gauge had a selector so you could see how much was in each tank. Additionally, you could use up just one drop tank, then eject JUST it then run on the other. My guess is most aircraft worked the same.

Unfortunately, that was much more complex then what they designed the sim to do...Pity, but how it is.

K2