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View Full Version : ** First Patrol Narrative - The Big One **



Treetop64
04-27-2005, 12:38 AM
Just bought SHIII over a week ago, and had this experience in my first patrol. Thought this might be interesting:

We are on our first patrol in our Type VII boat. My crew and I left Kiel on the 1st of September, 1939, to patrol sector AM24, about halfway between the Azores and northwestern Scotland.

The first and second days out we saw nothing. By mid-afternoon on the third day, as we rounded past the northern tip of Denmark, the lookouts spotted only a single Norwegian trawler on an easterly course. I decided not to give the order to dive the boat, and the lookouts and I all watched as the small fishing vessel pitched and bobbed it's way past our port side, passing to within half a kilometer of us.

Four days later we reach our assigned patrol zone, AM24, and we have not seen another hint of seawardly human activity since spotting our friends from Norway earlier. Then another day passes - still nothing.

One more day passes, and we finally get a report, at roughly 0800, that a British vessel is steaming slowly on a north-by-northwesterly course, about seven hours from our position at 2/3rds speed, at a bearing of 145 degrees. The nav plots an intercept course, and we go on our way to investigate. Just a little past 1500 we arrive at our intercept point and loiter. And loiter. And loiter...

Thirty six hours pass, and no joy. Despondent, I give the order to turn around and resume our assigned patrol. Daylight passes. Early evening comes and goes, elegantly retiring to yet another typically beautiful sunset at sea. Night falls, and midnight passes uneventfully. We enter the dark, early morning hours of the 12th day of the patrol.

"Contact! Warship, Bearing 250. Closing. Moving fast!"

As this event caught me completely by surprise, it took a moment for it to register just what was happening. However, I quickly snapped to it and gave the order to crash dive, then ease off at periscope depth.

"Contact! Warship, bearing 245. Closing. Moving fast!"

I thought to myself, upon hearing the second contact information, that we might be doomed, for it seems that we may have been spotted, and there may be multiple contacts coming right at us, probably destroyers.

"Contact! Warship, bearing 248. Closing. Moving fast!"

I raised the attack periscope and quickly wheeled it around in the general direction of the contatcts. As the sonarman yelled out yet another warship contact - closing and moving fast, of course - I eyballed what looked to be a destroyer, and it was surely closing. However, to my great relief, it was not closing on a direct bearing. We were just off his port bow, and drifting further to his port beam. He did not see us.

Still, more fast moving warship contacts are shouted, and I'm wondering just what the hell did I stumble into here, as up to now I've spotted six British destroyers, all steaming in a straight line, on a north-by-northwesterly heading. I note, however, that they are steaming along at 21 knots; not quite battle speed, but not exactly cruising speed either. How peculiar...

By now our boat has turned around to face this situation, and I breathe much easier as it is now obviously beyond any doubt that we were not spotted by the enemy. However, in my effort to analyze just what the situation was - considering the somewhat peculiar disposition of our quarry - much time passed, and I realized that I must now make a decision quickly on what to do about it. Then, as I panned the periscope just a bit further to the right, I discovered that our destroyer friends had some company: one Revenge class battleship, and one of the 16 inch Nelson battlewagons. They were only two and a half kilometers from our boat's nose, and we were just forward of their port beam.

"Oh - my - God!" I thought, feeling a wry smile strecth across my face. We have just been handed a golden platter. I wasted no time in selecting the juicier of the two morsels - the Nelson - locked a solution, and loosed three fish on it. Just as I was about to launch a fourth upon it for good measure, another destroyer crossed right into view, completely blocking my view of the Nelson. The fourth fish was sent to him.

As the torpedoes moved along towards their goals, I thought "These guys are sure in a big ****ed hurry for something. 21 knots is about all those Nelsons can muster, and they are taking no deviations in course."

"Indeed", I thought, "they must be headed to Scapa Flow."

Time's up, and the fourth torp missed the destroyer that crossed close by. He continues on his way. I pan to the Nelson.

Moments later, I see a huge plume of water erupt alongside the Nelson, the hit being confirmed by the sonarman hearing the blast. Seconds later, the second torpedo hits. Personal euphoria commences...

Time's up for the third, and no joy. However, the Nelson has slowed, and has begun to list to port, the visual details of the action becoming clearer as the glow of the sun below the horizon begins to illuminate the area. It is now half past 4 a.m.

The intrepid destroyers begin their dance, circling about and shining their searchlights in a vain attempt to locate us. High-intensity flares are fired into the pre-dawn sky by the escorts, brightly illuminating their collegues and our victim, which by now is dead in the water and listing even further port. All of the pyrotecnics are reflecting beautifully off the waves of the Atlantic. All of this is taking place more than 3000 meters from us, virtually insuring that as long as we stay put, we will not be detected.

Then suddenly I realize that the Nelson has begun steaming again, albeit at a slow pace of 7 knots, but making way nonetheless. The escorts follow suit. The Nelson is listing about 20-25 degrees. The Revenge has long since dissasppeared over the horizon - no point for her to nose around, only to get torpedoed herself!

Incredulously, I watch the "big one get away", deciding not to pursue and commence an unequal battle. The escorts now know they have uninvited company, and before long the sun will peek over the eastern horizon.

We turn around, and resume our assigned patrol at AM24.

At the end of it all, we sank a grand total of 'zero' vessels during that encounter. Nada. Zilch. Desite this statistic, though, this encounter goes down as one of the best gaming experiences I've ever had. Bravo to UbiSoft and gang for making such a superb product! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Treetop64
04-27-2005, 12:38 AM
Just bought SHIII over a week ago, and had this experience in my first patrol. Thought this might be interesting:

We are on our first patrol in our Type VII boat. My crew and I left Kiel on the 1st of September, 1939, to patrol sector AM24, about halfway between the Azores and northwestern Scotland.

The first and second days out we saw nothing. By mid-afternoon on the third day, as we rounded past the northern tip of Denmark, the lookouts spotted only a single Norwegian trawler on an easterly course. I decided not to give the order to dive the boat, and the lookouts and I all watched as the small fishing vessel pitched and bobbed it's way past our port side, passing to within half a kilometer of us.

Four days later we reach our assigned patrol zone, AM24, and we have not seen another hint of seawardly human activity since spotting our friends from Norway earlier. Then another day passes - still nothing.

One more day passes, and we finally get a report, at roughly 0800, that a British vessel is steaming slowly on a north-by-northwesterly course, about seven hours from our position at 2/3rds speed, at a bearing of 145 degrees. The nav plots an intercept course, and we go on our way to investigate. Just a little past 1500 we arrive at our intercept point and loiter. And loiter. And loiter...

Thirty six hours pass, and no joy. Despondent, I give the order to turn around and resume our assigned patrol. Daylight passes. Early evening comes and goes, elegantly retiring to yet another typically beautiful sunset at sea. Night falls, and midnight passes uneventfully. We enter the dark, early morning hours of the 12th day of the patrol.

"Contact! Warship, Bearing 250. Closing. Moving fast!"

As this event caught me completely by surprise, it took a moment for it to register just what was happening. However, I quickly snapped to it and gave the order to crash dive, then ease off at periscope depth.

"Contact! Warship, bearing 245. Closing. Moving fast!"

I thought to myself, upon hearing the second contact information, that we might be doomed, for it seems that we may have been spotted, and there may be multiple contacts coming right at us, probably destroyers.

"Contact! Warship, bearing 248. Closing. Moving fast!"

I raised the attack periscope and quickly wheeled it around in the general direction of the contatcts. As the sonarman yelled out yet another warship contact - closing and moving fast, of course - I eyballed what looked to be a destroyer, and it was surely closing. However, to my great relief, it was not closing on a direct bearing. We were just off his port bow, and drifting further to his port beam. He did not see us.

Still, more fast moving warship contacts are shouted, and I'm wondering just what the hell did I stumble into here, as up to now I've spotted six British destroyers, all steaming in a straight line, on a north-by-northwesterly heading. I note, however, that they are steaming along at 21 knots; not quite battle speed, but not exactly cruising speed either. How peculiar...

By now our boat has turned around to face this situation, and I breathe much easier as it is now obviously beyond any doubt that we were not spotted by the enemy. However, in my effort to analyze just what the situation was - considering the somewhat peculiar disposition of our quarry - much time passed, and I realized that I must now make a decision quickly on what to do about it. Then, as I panned the periscope just a bit further to the right, I discovered that our destroyer friends had some company: one Revenge class battleship, and one of the 16 inch Nelson battlewagons. They were only two and a half kilometers from our boat's nose, and we were just forward of their port beam.

"Oh - my - God!" I thought, feeling a wry smile strecth across my face. We have just been handed a golden platter. I wasted no time in selecting the juicier of the two morsels - the Nelson - locked a solution, and loosed three fish on it. Just as I was about to launch a fourth upon it for good measure, another destroyer crossed right into view, completely blocking my view of the Nelson. The fourth fish was sent to him.

As the torpedoes moved along towards their goals, I thought "These guys are sure in a big ****ed hurry for something. 21 knots is about all those Nelsons can muster, and they are taking no deviations in course."

"Indeed", I thought, "they must be headed to Scapa Flow."

Time's up, and the fourth torp missed the destroyer that crossed close by. He continues on his way. I pan to the Nelson.

Moments later, I see a huge plume of water erupt alongside the Nelson, the hit being confirmed by the sonarman hearing the blast. Seconds later, the second torpedo hits. Personal euphoria commences...

Time's up for the third, and no joy. However, the Nelson has slowed, and has begun to list to port, the visual details of the action becoming clearer as the glow of the sun below the horizon begins to illuminate the area. It is now half past 4 a.m.

The intrepid destroyers begin their dance, circling about and shining their searchlights in a vain attempt to locate us. High-intensity flares are fired into the pre-dawn sky by the escorts, brightly illuminating their collegues and our victim, which by now is dead in the water and listing even further port. All of the pyrotecnics are reflecting beautifully off the waves of the Atlantic. All of this is taking place more than 3000 meters from us, virtually insuring that as long as we stay put, we will not be detected.

Then suddenly I realize that the Nelson has begun steaming again, albeit at a slow pace of 7 knots, but making way nonetheless. The escorts follow suit. The Nelson is listing about 20-25 degrees. The Revenge has long since dissasppeared over the horizon - no point for her to nose around, only to get torpedoed herself!

Incredulously, I watch the "big one get away", deciding not to pursue and commence an unequal battle. The escorts now know they have uninvited company, and before long the sun will peek over the eastern horizon.

We turn around, and resume our assigned patrol at AM24.

At the end of it all, we sank a grand total of 'zero' vessels during that encounter. Nada. Zilch. Desite this statistic, though, this encounter goes down as one of the best gaming experiences I've ever had. Bravo to UbiSoft and gang for making such a superb product! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

alanschu
04-27-2005, 01:25 AM
Congrats on the fun experience.

Too bad you were not able to fully capitalize.


I would have probably considered getting the aft torpedo on it as well, preferably magnetic towards the aft of the ship to possibly cripple it. A dead in the water battleship is a juicy target just waiting to be picked off once you have some time to reload http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif