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knoc11
01-22-2005, 06:51 AM

knoc11
01-22-2005, 06:51 AM
Edit: Posted 23 Jan 2005, this is a year old guys.

I am a newbe and am becoming very frustrated with trying to make a decent landing. I have not tried the carrier because I have had only a few, close to succeses, on the airport. I have been using the hellcat because I have many hours and carrier landing in Hellcats. This,turns out to be much more difficult. Thanks. knoc11

Chuck_Older
01-22-2005, 07:23 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Hi Knoc11

I am a bit confused...Are you saying you have actual flight experience with Hellcats in the real world and have conducted carrier ops with them?

My reply would depend on this, because I would be explaining some real life things you already know intimately

If you are a (presumably former, because the F6F has been phased out for 5 decades) Naval Aviator, then my only suggestions would revolve around the way the sim does it's thing, rather than how an aircraft reacts in flight. Also, I'd ask where you served and when, and say "Thanks" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

If you are not, then I would have to go into the whole nine yards of what's happening when you're landing

In either case, there may be a good place to start.

From the Main Screen, go to "Training", and choose a carrier landing. Maybe that can get you on your way in mastering the landings in the sim. Also, you can record yourself flying, and look at the recording, called a "track", later on, and maybe that will give you some ideas about what's wrong.

Personally, I find the F4U perversely easy to land on a carrier deck in the sim compared to it's contemporary US Navy aircraft

Oh- about the poll-

you accidentally chose to ask a poll question, instead of making a new discussion

Tully__
01-22-2005, 07:30 AM
Line up the runway a good distance out (at least 5 runway lengths) at a height that gives a nice flat approach and with not more than 300km/h (180mph) speed. Pull back the throttle to lower speed and ease out the flaps gradually, extending landing gear after you're slower than 250km/h (155mph). Establish a smooth steady glide towards the start of the runway and let your speed drop to 180km/h (110mph). Trim for this speed so you don't have to struggle with the joystick all the way to the runway. If you're at the right approach angle you'll only need 15-25% throttle to maintain this speed. If you need more throttle, your glide slope is probably too shallow, if you need less it's too steep.

As you're just crossing the runway threshold, ease the nose up to keep the plane just off the runway and ease the throttle back to zero. Don't try to land, instead try to fly level with your wheels just barely skimming over the runway. With no throttle, you'll slow down until you stall onto the runway. By that time you'll be very close to a three point landing attitude and the plane will just settle onto the ground nice and stable.

When on your approach, if you look like you're going to overshoot, don't push the stick forward. Instead, back the throttle off a few percent. Likewise, if you're going to land short, don't pull the stick back, instead add a few percent throttle.

If you're going too fast on the approach, pull the stick back a fraction and add some nose high trim to hold the new attitude. Similarly, if you're going too slow push the stick forward a fraction and adjust trim to hold the new attitude.

With only a slight difference in throttle setting and speed, this technique should work for all aircraft.

VW-IceFire
01-22-2005, 08:24 AM
Fly parallel to the runway, once past it, fly a bit more, turn in to a landing approach, line up, reduce throttle to 20%, slowly deploy combat flaps, then takeoff flaps, then landing flaps, deploy gear, you should be almost over the runway by now (altitude around 100 meters or less), keep your hand on the throttle and keep your speed to 160kph IAS or slightly higher....pull gently back on the stick and your gear should hit the ground.

Hellcat is easy to land on airfields...once you master this, be prepared to spend just as long or longer on aircraft carriers. I was experienced at landing when PF came out and the carriers posed me some problems.

Yimmy
01-22-2005, 09:15 AM
For practicing carrier landings I would reccomend the SBD5.

Reaper0174
01-22-2006, 08:37 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tully__:
Line up the runway a good distance out (at least 5 runway lengths) at a height that gives a nice flat approach and with not more than 300km/h (180mph) speed. Pull back the throttle to lower speed and ease out the flaps gradually, extending landing gear after you're slower than 250km/h (155mph). Establish a smooth steady glide towards the start of the runway and let your speed drop to 180km/h (110mph). Trim for this speed so you don't have to struggle with the joystick all the way to the runway. If you're at the right approach angle you'll only need 15-25% throttle to maintain this speed. If you need more throttle, your glide slope is probably too shallow, if you need less it's too steep.

As you're just crossing the runway threshold, ease the nose up to keep the plane just off the runway and ease the throttle back to zero. Don't try to land, instead try to fly level with your wheels just barely skimming over the runway. With no throttle, you'll slow down until you stall onto the runway. By that time you'll be very close to a three point landing attitude and the plane will just settle onto the ground nice and stable.

When on your approach, if you look like you're going to overshoot, don't push the stick forward. Instead, back the throttle off a few percent. Likewise, if you're going to land short, don't pull the stick back, instead add a few percent throttle.

If you're going too fast on the approach, pull the stick back a fraction and add some nose high trim to hold the new attitude. Similarly, if you're going too slow push the stick forward a fraction and adjust trim to hold the new attitude.

With only a slight difference in throttle setting and speed, this technique should work for all aircraft. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



Wow thanks a ton my noob self was having problems landing as well.

Tully__
01-22-2006, 09:49 PM
You're welcome... though you'll probably find the throttle settings suggested in this old thread need to be a tad higher in the latest version (4.02 / 4.02m)

Freelancer-1
01-22-2006, 10:51 PM
A good plane for learning take off and landing is a Cobra (P39/400/63).

These things drive like a car on the ground so they're easy to taxi without all the "S" turns. On take off, because they are tricycle gear, your visiblity is good enough that you won't be running off the runway as much as in a tail dragger.

These things will handle a short final and are forgiving if you come in a little hot. You can pretty much fly one onto the runway and jump on the brakes without worrying about nosing over.

I find it easier to land on a carrier in a Cobra than with a Navy plane!

Just don't go off dogfighting in one if you are new to the game. That's a whole different kettle of fish.

Cheers,

KrashanTopolova
01-23-2006, 01:21 AM
carrier landings are more of a controlled crash than ground landings are. They differ in that carrier landings need to be close to three point landings in order to catch the arresting wire. In addition to Tully's advice: when you become competent at nice smooth airfields try landing on a beach. That will take the nerves out of anyone; as a pilot you need to be able to 'manhandle' an aircraft. When landing on the ground it is done with about 30-50% power on. This is different to landing on nice smooth mown or concrete airfields where a pilot normally reduces throttle on flaring out the aircraft for landing as described above n(Aussie Spitfire pilots on duty for Darwin defence were crashing frequently on landing on narrow jungle airfields until the RAAF investigated and found that the pilots were employing normal reduction throttle when landing on those rough dirt and mud airstrips. The solution was more power on landings and the crash incidents disappeared).

Tip: If you're too high on the landing approach slide slip (one wing down and opposite rudder) this will allow you to lose height quickly but will throw the aircraft off track when you release the wing and rudder.
Flaring is the final art in landing; the art of holding the aircraft till it sinks by itself. When done properly you will not know that you have landed until you hear those wheels creaking.
Cheers!

major_setback
01-23-2006, 01:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by knoc11:
I am a newbe and am becoming very frustrated with trying to make a decent landing. I have not tried the carrier because I have had only a few, close to succeses, on the airport. I have been using the hellcat because I have many hours and carrier landing in Hellcats. This,turns out to be much more difficult. Thanks. knoc11 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi and welcome! Firstly if you are only asking a question you should be posting this as a 'discussion' not a 'poll'.

secondly : As was mentioned before your post is a bit confusing. You say at first 'I have not tried the carrier ' than next line say the exact opposite: 'I have been using the hellcat because I have many hours and carrier landing in Hellcats'.

Could you repeat your question (more clearly) please. You can add to this thread. Do this by pressing the 'reply' tab at the bottom of this page.

Tully__
01-23-2006, 02:35 AM
Check the date on the first post guys 'n' gals http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Freelancer-1
01-23-2006, 06:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tully__:
Check the date on the first post guys 'n' gals http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

DOH!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

major_setback
01-23-2006, 11:49 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif
Landed anything yet?

major_setback
01-23-2006, 11:50 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Reaper0174:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Tully__:
Line up the runway a good distance out (at least 5 runway lengths) at a height that gives a nice flat approach and with not more than 300km/h (180mph) speed. Pull back the throttle to lower speed and ease out the flaps gradually, extending landing gear after you're slower than 250km/h (155mph). Establish a smooth steady glide towards the start of the runway and let your speed drop to 180km/h (110mph). Trim for this speed so you don't have to struggle with the joystick all the way to the runway. If you're at the right approach angle you'll only need 15-25% throttle to maintain this speed. If you need more throttle, your glide slope is probably too shallow, if you need less it's too steep.

As you're just crossing the runway threshold, ease the nose up to keep the plane just off the runway and ease the throttle back to zero. Don't try to land, instead try to fly level with your wheels just barely skimming over the runway. With no throttle, you'll slow down until you stall onto the runway. By that time you'll be very close to a three point landing attitude and the plane will just settle onto the ground nice and stable.

When on your approach, if you look like you're going to overshoot, don't push the stick forward. Instead, back the throttle off a few percent. Likewise, if you're going to land short, don't pull the stick back, instead add a few percent throttle.

If you're going too fast on the approach, pull the stick back a fraction and add some nose high trim to hold the new attitude. Similarly, if you're going too slow push the stick forward a fraction and adjust trim to hold the new attitude.

With only a slight difference in throttle setting and speed, this technique should work for all aircraft. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



Wow thanks a ton my noob self was having problems landing as well. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hi and welcome!