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View Full Version : Who would survive their first 10 missions based on controls mastery?



Chris0382
05-21-2007, 05:33 AM
I have had my controls set up for over 6 months now and I still find myself hitting the wrong button or pulling the wrong lever under pressure of a dog fight or ground attack. I feel this must have been crucial for survival and that the top aces may have been a master of their controls. I for one am not a master of my controls and should be very thankful this is just a game because had it been real life I would not likely survive for too long in a real dog fighting campaign.

If mastery of the controls were top priority, who out there feels they would be survive their first ten mission based on their mastery of the controls? Or am I being too hard on myself.

Chris0382
05-21-2007, 05:33 AM
I have had my controls set up for over 6 months now and I still find myself hitting the wrong button or pulling the wrong lever under pressure of a dog fight or ground attack. I feel this must have been crucial for survival and that the top aces may have been a master of their controls. I for one am not a master of my controls and should be very thankful this is just a game because had it been real life I would not likely survive for too long in a real dog fighting campaign.

If mastery of the controls were top priority, who out there feels they would be survive their first ten mission based on their mastery of the controls? Or am I being too hard on myself.

Yellonet
05-21-2007, 05:39 AM
You just need to figure out a logical set up.
It's as simple as that http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Start with mapping the basics and then add controls in order of importance, and remember, you don't need everything.

Bearcat99
05-21-2007, 07:38 AM
Keep in mind that for the real pilots.. having all the functions spread out in front of them and on the left & right was a lot differen t from having @40+ functions mapped into a space that is @ 2 square feet.. if you consider even a HOTAS & a keyboard.

horseback
05-21-2007, 08:03 AM
Not so much a problem for me anymore; I've had my setup(s) practically set in stone for the last couple of years. I took a lot of time thinking them out and charting them before I was satisfied (hint: if you already have a trigger on your joystick, why are you wasting an easily reached keyboard button like the Spacebar on that function?).

However, my reading indicates that for most WWII fighter units, a pilot needed to demonstrate that he could find every critical control in the cockpit while literally blindfolded before they would let him take it up for the first time. Every fighter type differed from the others (sometimes from serial number or 'blocks' within the same type model) in critical ways. You HAD to be able to fly with your head & eyes "out of the cockpit." Forgetting where the flaps or gun-charging handle was at the wrong time could be fatal, so they tended to take it seriously.

Late war Allied pilots had something like 200 hours of flight time before they moved on to their first 'operational' types. If you consider that that 200 flight hours was actually about 8-10 hours of flying per week out of a week stuffed full of Ground School, physical training, military instruction & drill on top of the actual stick and rudder time, you understand that you had to be not only pretty smart, but quite disciplined to earn the privilige of flying the first line fighters.

Fortunately for us, the most realistic combat flight sim around doesn't require nearly as much study and dedication.

cheers

horseback