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View Full Version : Double Lucky 77th FR in Burma - Buffal Wings



Blue_Baron
05-14-2008, 10:13 AM
Okay we know the P51 got the undermodel shaft, and that Italian, Japanese and American 12.7 guns equate to BB guns in the game. And we know that if you fly a Soviet plane there is a huge advantage no matter what. How did a guy like Utilaneen knock down clunky DB2's yet in the game it is like shooting a flying tank?

IL2 grade - unbalanced tward Soviet equipment, only 80 percent accurate and complete. Great aircraft graphics, thats it.

http://www.warbirdforum.com/lucky2.htm

The Buffalo flown by the RAF in Burma and Malaya has been much maligned and characterized as an inferior fighter. It had been accepted by the U.S. Navy as its first monoplane carrier fighter and equipped several navy and marine squadrons. It was used successfully by the Finns against the Soviets. In Burma in an early 1942 trial combat against the Hawker Hurricane IIB, the Buffalo bested the tropicalized Hurricane in many respects. A test between a Buffalo and Hurricane in Britain in late 1940 had produced essentially similar results. An experienced pilot who flew both types in Singapore stated: "I didn't think the Hurricane was as good as the Buffalo." Whatever its actual merits it had many modern features including four machine guns, protected fuel tanks, and a nominal maximum speed over 300 m.p.h. (some accounts indicate the effective maximum speed was only about 290 m.p.h. but many other aircraft in operations probably did not meet advertised performance figures). Though not as fast in a dive as the Tomahawk, the Buffalo could dive faster than the Japanese fighters. The RAF Buffaloes in Burma were also being retro-fitted with pilot armor.

The Tomahawk flown by the AVG has sometimes been referred to as obsolescent. It was, however, in large scale use by the RAF in the Middle East, was the most numerous U.S. fighter in the Philippines and the best U.S. fighter in Hawaii. Its successor, the P-40E Kittyhawk, was just coming into service with the U.S. and British air forces in late 1941. The Tomahawk was the best American-built fighter available in significant numbers in December 1941. It featured two .50 caliber and four .30 caliber machine guns, protected fuel tanks and pilot armor. In contrast to the Buffalo, it was powered by a liquid cooled V-12 engine. Like the Buffalo its engine produced in excess of 1,000 horse power.

The Type 97 fighter flown by the 77th FR was a fighter from a different era designed to a different philosophy than the latest western fighters. Unlike the Buffalo and Tomahawk, it had fixed landing gear in streamlined fairings. It was lighter and had a less powerful engine (710 h.p., Ha-1b) than either the Buffalo or Tomahawk. It was armed with only two 7.7mm machine guns and most had no fuel tank or pilot protection. Some fighters of the 77th were fitted with 9mm pilot armor. It did have outstanding maneuverability and a good climb rate (5m22s to 16,400 feet). Its range, when equipped with droppable external fuel tanks (not always available), was good. Its nominal maximum speed of 285 m.p.h. was far slower than the maximum speed of the Tomahawk (over 340 m.p.h.) and slower than the Buffalo even under tropical conditions.

Blue_Baron
05-14-2008, 10:13 AM
Okay we know the P51 got the undermodel shaft, and that Italian, Japanese and American 12.7 guns equate to BB guns in the game. And we know that if you fly a Soviet plane there is a huge advantage no matter what. How did a guy like Utilaneen knock down clunky DB2's yet in the game it is like shooting a flying tank?

IL2 grade - unbalanced tward Soviet equipment, only 80 percent accurate and complete. Great aircraft graphics, thats it.

http://www.warbirdforum.com/lucky2.htm

The Buffalo flown by the RAF in Burma and Malaya has been much maligned and characterized as an inferior fighter. It had been accepted by the U.S. Navy as its first monoplane carrier fighter and equipped several navy and marine squadrons. It was used successfully by the Finns against the Soviets. In Burma in an early 1942 trial combat against the Hawker Hurricane IIB, the Buffalo bested the tropicalized Hurricane in many respects. A test between a Buffalo and Hurricane in Britain in late 1940 had produced essentially similar results. An experienced pilot who flew both types in Singapore stated: "I didn't think the Hurricane was as good as the Buffalo." Whatever its actual merits it had many modern features including four machine guns, protected fuel tanks, and a nominal maximum speed over 300 m.p.h. (some accounts indicate the effective maximum speed was only about 290 m.p.h. but many other aircraft in operations probably did not meet advertised performance figures). Though not as fast in a dive as the Tomahawk, the Buffalo could dive faster than the Japanese fighters. The RAF Buffaloes in Burma were also being retro-fitted with pilot armor.

The Tomahawk flown by the AVG has sometimes been referred to as obsolescent. It was, however, in large scale use by the RAF in the Middle East, was the most numerous U.S. fighter in the Philippines and the best U.S. fighter in Hawaii. Its successor, the P-40E Kittyhawk, was just coming into service with the U.S. and British air forces in late 1941. The Tomahawk was the best American-built fighter available in significant numbers in December 1941. It featured two .50 caliber and four .30 caliber machine guns, protected fuel tanks and pilot armor. In contrast to the Buffalo, it was powered by a liquid cooled V-12 engine. Like the Buffalo its engine produced in excess of 1,000 horse power.

The Type 97 fighter flown by the 77th FR was a fighter from a different era designed to a different philosophy than the latest western fighters. Unlike the Buffalo and Tomahawk, it had fixed landing gear in streamlined fairings. It was lighter and had a less powerful engine (710 h.p., Ha-1b) than either the Buffalo or Tomahawk. It was armed with only two 7.7mm machine guns and most had no fuel tank or pilot protection. Some fighters of the 77th were fitted with 9mm pilot armor. It did have outstanding maneuverability and a good climb rate (5m22s to 16,400 feet). Its range, when equipped with droppable external fuel tanks (not always available), was good. Its nominal maximum speed of 285 m.p.h. was far slower than the maximum speed of the Tomahawk (over 340 m.p.h.) and slower than the Buffalo even under tropical conditions.