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Dominicrigg
10-19-2005, 09:14 AM
Just found this whilst pooching around on the internet. I had seen the film with my grandad when i was a kid, and it was interesting to me then!

Got me thinking "How cool would a British Mediteranian Sub game be??!?!?!!?" Very cool is the answer i think http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Posted 01 September, 2004 10:01


Last month, a British former submarine commander died at age 90 in the relative anonymity of an armed forces care home in suburban London. With him went perhaps the last direct link to one of the most astonishing stories of World War II.

Captain Bill Jewell, whose obituary took more than a week to make the British newspapers, was at the center of an audacious plan which completely wrongfooted the Germans about planned Allied landings in southern Europe.

Jewell was the commander of submarine HMS Seraph when, in 1943, he was chosen to carry out Operation Mincemeat, a plan so secret that even his own crew knew nothing about it until long after the war was finished.



Jewell€s gruesome task, as his vessel floated off the coast of southern Spain, was to launch a man€s body dressed up as a Royal Marines officer, wearing a life jacket and with a briefcase chained to its wrist.

Inside the case were carefully faked plans and letters detailing the proposed invasions of Corsica and Sardinia, whereas in fact the Allies had set Sicily as the real objective.

The body of €œMajor Martin€ -- the real identity of the corpse remains unknown to this day -- was washed up on the Spanish coast.

Authorities in nominally neutral Madrid buried him with full military honors and sent the seemingly unopened case back to London.

However, the papers had been copied for the Germans, who beefed up defenses in the places mentioned in the plans, even pulling tank divisions out of Russia to reinforce troops.

The stunningly successful ruse was undertaken in complete secrecy, with Jewell even ordering his men below decks as he jettisoned what he told them was a secret weather device.

The commander€s own wartime memoirs failed to mention the plan, and it was only in the 1950s that investigative reporters uncovered the story, swiftly made into 1955 film €œThe Man Who Never Was.€

The escapade was just one of a number of astonishing wartime tales for Jewell, who was born in the Seychelles to a colonial officer father and joined the Royal Navy in 1936.

Among the more unorthodox war missions recounted in newspaper obituaries of Jewell was the time he was ordered to fetch General Henri Honore Giraud, supposedly the only man who could unite French forces in North Africa, after he escaped German internment.

Giraud was waiting to be picked up by submarine from the coast of southern France, but there was one snag -- he violently disliked the British and refused to be rescued by them.

To get around this, HMS Seraph was transformed into USS Seraph, an American ship €˜commanded€ by a specially-installed U.S. officer, reputedly commissioned as a Royal Navy officer by Jewell wielding a rolled-up picture of a nude woman torn from a magazine.

The charade saw Seraph fly the Stars and Stripes as Giraud was quietly picked up, and for the several days the French general was aboard, the submarine€s sailors valiantly tried to mimic American accents heard in films.

Another notable mission came when Jewell was forced to almost beach his submarine off the coast of Algeria to pick up U.S. officers fleeing from the enemy following talks with French commanders.

Jewell additionally sank or damaged a number of enemy ships, one of which was a German U-boat which he opted to ram.

His heroism brought Jewell honors from Britain, the United States and France.

More amazingly still, in 1945 a doctor found Jewell had broken two vertebrae when he had fallen down a hatch four years earlier -- meaning he had fought the bulk of the war with a broken neck.


Just thought it made an interesting read and wanted to share http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Dominicrigg
10-19-2005, 09:14 AM
Just found this whilst pooching around on the internet. I had seen the film with my grandad when i was a kid, and it was interesting to me then!

Got me thinking "How cool would a British Mediteranian Sub game be??!?!?!!?" Very cool is the answer i think http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Posted 01 September, 2004 10:01
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
Last month, a British former submarine commander died at age 90 in the relative anonymity of an armed forces care home in suburban London. With him went perhaps the last direct link to one of the most astonishing stories of World War II.

Captain Bill Jewell, whose obituary took more than a week to make the British newspapers, was at the center of an audacious plan which completely wrongfooted the Germans about planned Allied landings in southern Europe.

Jewell was the commander of submarine HMS Seraph when, in 1943, he was chosen to carry out Operation Mincemeat, a plan so secret that even his own crew knew nothing about it until long after the war was finished.



Jewell€s gruesome task, as his vessel floated off the coast of southern Spain, was to launch a man€s body dressed up as a Royal Marines officer, wearing a life jacket and with a briefcase chained to its wrist.

Inside the case were carefully faked plans and letters detailing the proposed invasions of Corsica and Sardinia, whereas in fact the Allies had set Sicily as the real objective.

The body of €œMajor Martin€ -- the real identity of the corpse remains unknown to this day -- was washed up on the Spanish coast.

Authorities in nominally neutral Madrid buried him with full military honors and sent the seemingly unopened case back to London.

However, the papers had been copied for the Germans, who beefed up defenses in the places mentioned in the plans, even pulling tank divisions out of Russia to reinforce troops.

The stunningly successful ruse was undertaken in complete secrecy, with Jewell even ordering his men below decks as he jettisoned what he told them was a secret weather device.

The commander€s own wartime memoirs failed to mention the plan, and it was only in the 1950s that investigative reporters uncovered the story, swiftly made into 1955 film €œThe Man Who Never Was.€

The escapade was just one of a number of astonishing wartime tales for Jewell, who was born in the Seychelles to a colonial officer father and joined the Royal Navy in 1936.

Among the more unorthodox war missions recounted in newspaper obituaries of Jewell was the time he was ordered to fetch General Henri Honore Giraud, supposedly the only man who could unite French forces in North Africa, after he escaped German internment.

Giraud was waiting to be picked up by submarine from the coast of southern France, but there was one snag -- he violently disliked the British and refused to be rescued by them.

To get around this, HMS Seraph was transformed into USS Seraph, an American ship €˜commanded€ by a specially-installed U.S. officer, reputedly commissioned as a Royal Navy officer by Jewell wielding a rolled-up picture of a nude woman torn from a magazine.

The charade saw Seraph fly the Stars and Stripes as Giraud was quietly picked up, and for the several days the French general was aboard, the submarine€s sailors valiantly tried to mimic American accents heard in films.

Another notable mission came when Jewell was forced to almost beach his submarine off the coast of Algeria to pick up U.S. officers fleeing from the enemy following talks with French commanders.

Jewell additionally sank or damaged a number of enemy ships, one of which was a German U-boat which he opted to ram.

His heroism brought Jewell honors from Britain, the United States and France.

More amazingly still, in 1945 a doctor found Jewell had broken two vertebrae when he had fallen down a hatch four years earlier -- meaning he had fought the bulk of the war with a broken neck. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Just thought it made an interesting read and wanted to share http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Celeon999
10-19-2005, 09:18 AM
There is a movie about this story. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

But i dont remember its name.

Dominicrigg
10-19-2005, 09:19 AM
"The man who never was"

joeap
10-19-2005, 09:20 AM
"The Man who Never Was", IIRC. It was a book too (which I read).

FinFury
10-19-2005, 11:54 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif germans took the bait and even pulled panzer division from russia for backup... sure those panzers could been coming in need somewhere else.

Kaleun1961
10-19-2005, 12:29 PM
Operation Fortitude was the code name for the deception operations prior to Overlord. This saw the Allies fill fields with inflatable tanks, fake radio signals on the airwaves, etc. Every now and then they would let a German reconnaissance plane get through to take photos of this dummy buildup, while shooting down every plane which approached the real buildup area.

I had to put this in when I saw the thread title. I thought at first it was going to be about the Normandy D-Day. Anyway, I'm not disappointed, as I found this an interesting discussion.