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FAAdiogenes
08-13-2004, 09:46 PM
Hope I'm not the first to advocate seeing this ususual product of pre-war naval doctrine in Pacific Fighters http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

I must confess, it's taken me a long time to bother to have a look at the Pacific Fighters forum: the air war in the pacific has, afterall, been done so many times...
Even though I know it would be done very well with the quality obvious in Sturmovik...

But the instant I saw the images of the British carrier in the updates forum, my interest was captured http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

A poor second to the almost virgin theatre of the Mediterranean and North Africa. But at least the role of the RN is being looked at.

Truly part of the "Forgotten Battles" genre http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Apart from the controversial Seafire, the Fleet Air Arm did field another of its own designs in the Pacific: The Fairey Firefly.

This aircraft was the last vestage of Britain's pre-world war II carrier doctrine. It was a doctrine based mainly around the imperative of trade protection: scouting the sea-lanes for raiders in a bid to protect the convoys that were the life-blood of Britain.

It was designed as an "FR" - or "Fighter-Reconnaisance" aircraft. Like the pitiful Skua, the requirement called for two crew in an aircraft with fighter characteristics.

As the reality of war changed doctrine, the aircraft essentially became an "FA" - "Fighter-Attack". This was, in part, to compensate for the disappointing Barracuda (which never made it to the Pacific, from memory)

Four squadrons of this quiet achiever served in the Pacific. Mainly aboard HMS Implacable, I think. They were employed to attack airfields and oilworks with their bombs, rockets and 4x 20mm cannon.
They even shot down a few Japanese fighters: though, given the standard of their airforce at that time, this is no surprise.

The Griffon-engined FR MkI (and its radar carrying NF MkI) would certainly add some spice to the already overly-familiar arcraft in the Pacific lineup.

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FAAdiogenes
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FAAdiogenes
08-13-2004, 09:46 PM
Hope I'm not the first to advocate seeing this ususual product of pre-war naval doctrine in Pacific Fighters http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

I must confess, it's taken me a long time to bother to have a look at the Pacific Fighters forum: the air war in the pacific has, afterall, been done so many times...
Even though I know it would be done very well with the quality obvious in Sturmovik...

But the instant I saw the images of the British carrier in the updates forum, my interest was captured http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

A poor second to the almost virgin theatre of the Mediterranean and North Africa. But at least the role of the RN is being looked at.

Truly part of the "Forgotten Battles" genre http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Apart from the controversial Seafire, the Fleet Air Arm did field another of its own designs in the Pacific: The Fairey Firefly.

This aircraft was the last vestage of Britain's pre-world war II carrier doctrine. It was a doctrine based mainly around the imperative of trade protection: scouting the sea-lanes for raiders in a bid to protect the convoys that were the life-blood of Britain.

It was designed as an "FR" - or "Fighter-Reconnaisance" aircraft. Like the pitiful Skua, the requirement called for two crew in an aircraft with fighter characteristics.

As the reality of war changed doctrine, the aircraft essentially became an "FA" - "Fighter-Attack". This was, in part, to compensate for the disappointing Barracuda (which never made it to the Pacific, from memory)

Four squadrons of this quiet achiever served in the Pacific. Mainly aboard HMS Implacable, I think. They were employed to attack airfields and oilworks with their bombs, rockets and 4x 20mm cannon.
They even shot down a few Japanese fighters: though, given the standard of their airforce at that time, this is no surprise.

The Griffon-engined FR MkI (and its radar carrying NF MkI) would certainly add some spice to the already overly-familiar arcraft in the Pacific lineup.

-----------
FAAdiogenes
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Tooz_69GIAP
08-13-2004, 09:59 PM
Yep, a very interesting aircraft to say the least. British Naval doctrine for a good long while was to always have at least 2 crew in an aircraft, due to navigational difficulties found while at sea. The navy thought it's pilots would have too much to do flying the aircraft and navigating at the same time, so they always seemed to prefer to have a second pair of eyes in the back.

I have a feeling this type of doctrine may well have prevailed in the US Navy for a good number of years as the majority of navalised aircraft from WWII until today seem to have at least 2 crew as standard, including a good number of the fighters.

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TimTam27
08-14-2004, 01:50 AM
Hey FAAdiogenes,

don't diss the Skua!!!!

CHDT
08-14-2004, 02:25 AM
An interesting feature for two-seaters aircraft on full-real servers without the GPS icon would be that the two-seaters can keep their icons on the map (simulating the navigator) while the single-seater had to navigate by themselves or to fly with a two-seater to get some infos on their situation.

F19_Olli72
08-14-2004, 02:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by CHDT:
An interesting feature for two-seaters aircraft on full-real servers without the GPS icon would be that the two-seaters can keep their icons on the map (simulating the navigator) while the single-seater had to navigate by themselves or to fly with a two-seater to get some infos on their situation.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
I like that idea, not sure if its possible though http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

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WereSnowleopard
08-14-2004, 07:22 AM
I saw what Royal Navy have in Demo PF at Quakecon are Seafire III and Avenger MK. III, of course they do have Corsair and Seafire in RN campiagn. Maybe they will get more flyable planes in full PF when ship out.

Regards
Snowleopard

One13
08-14-2004, 10:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by FAAdiogenes:

Apart from the controversial Seafire, the Fleet Air Arm did field another of its own designs in the Pacific: The Fairey Firefly.
It was designed as an "FR" - or "Fighter-Reconnaisance" aircraft. Like the pitiful Skua, the requirement called for two crew in an aircraft with fighter characteristics.

As the reality of war changed doctrine, the aircraft essentially became an "FA" - "Fighter-Attack". This was, in part, to compensate for the disappointing Barracuda (which never made it to the Pacific, from memory)

Four squadrons of this quiet achiever served in the Pacific. Mainly aboard HMS Implacable, I think. They were employed to attack airfields and oilworks with their bombs, rockets and 4x 20mm cannon.
They even shot down a few Japanese fighters: though, given the standard of their airforce at that time, this is no surprise.

The Griffon-engined FR MkI (and its radar carrying NF MkI) would certainly add some spice to the already overly-familiar arcraft in the Pacific lineup.

-----------
FAAdiogenes
-----------<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
By all accounts it was quite a manoeuvrable with its Youngman aerofoil flaps partly extended. I have also seen it could carry up to sixteen 60lb rockets (altough this might have been a post-war version).
I believe one other reson for carrying a two man crew was the primitive nature of early aircraft radios.

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triggerhappyfin
08-14-2004, 11:06 AM
With some additional maps such as Med, Norway, Murmansk etc etc.

And perhaps with Swordfishes, Albacores and Skuas......

What a sim it would be http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/10.gif.

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Heads-on firing was not a safe practice after all ?
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And later, as the Russians were armed with 20mm cannons, it was unwise to meet them heads-on

Bobsqueek
08-14-2004, 11:43 AM
Fairey fulmar would be cool too, the predecessor to the firefly.

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VW-IceFire
08-14-2004, 04:11 PM
I asked for this one months ago...I think I got three people to reply before the thread died.

Fantastic aircraft...been able to see one a few months ago fly...very impressive. Saw plenty of PTO action...not sure if we'll see her in PF or not.

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