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fabianfred
11-12-2004, 05:36 PM
I see that the FMB starts off with most carriers as 28 kph....
looking at the specs for US carriers at that time, they mostly had a top speed of 32.5 knots...
I don't know how kph translates into knots, so guessed at the same as mph.... 30 mph = 50 kph

so by setting the speed at 50 kph for the take-off waypoint, you should be able to take-off with full load....
I had B25's off OK (AI), and Japanese torpedo plane B5N.. (or something) with type 91 torp (AI).....
funny how the wing of a B25 will go though the superstucture on take-off without any problem, but on landing will tear off.... if the AI applied brakes they would make it too, but they just fall off the end (B25)

fabianfred
11-12-2004, 05:36 PM
I see that the FMB starts off with most carriers as 28 kph....
looking at the specs for US carriers at that time, they mostly had a top speed of 32.5 knots...
I don't know how kph translates into knots, so guessed at the same as mph.... 30 mph = 50 kph

so by setting the speed at 50 kph for the take-off waypoint, you should be able to take-off with full load....
I had B25's off OK (AI), and Japanese torpedo plane B5N.. (or something) with type 91 torp (AI).....
funny how the wing of a B25 will go though the superstucture on take-off without any problem, but on landing will tear off.... if the AI applied brakes they would make it too, but they just fall off the end (B25)

Jason Bourne
11-12-2004, 05:46 PM
1 mile = 5280 feet
1 knot = 1 nautical mile = 6080 feet
a knot is also (I think) 1 second ot latitude

fabianfred
11-12-2004, 06:05 PM
so a real full speed of 30 knots is more like 55 kph then...?

I also found out how to adjust the order of flights taking-off from a carrier...

I started with one flight of four torp planes, then added zeros as fighter cover, but they were then second in line-up, they should go off first...
instead of deleting them and starting again, i opened the mission file in notepad and saw that at the top thee is a [wing] list, just make sure the flights are in that order... if not, re-assign/change wing numbers, and don't forget the [wing_waypoint] number too....

Tully__
11-12-2004, 09:58 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Jason Bourne:
1 mile = 5280 feet
1 knot = 1 nautical mile = 6080 feet
a knot is also (I think) 1 second ot latitude <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

1 knot = 1 nautical mile PER HOUR

A knot is a speed, not a distance.

LEXX_Luthor
11-13-2004, 12:37 AM
I'd use 50km/hr because its easy to calculate distance over time when mission building--map grid is kilometers so lala, and its doubtful carriers always went full max top speed all the time.

Also start using units km/hr or mi/hr or nm/hr because using Sloppy kph causes lots of Whining around here (czech out teh threads)

Texas LongHorn
11-13-2004, 03:07 AM
Oh no, Tully and LEXX as a one two punch! Oooh, that hurt &lt;ggg.&gt; You guys are getting waay too picky. On a side note, I still haven't changed the speedbar even though you can now. While used to the US system, I also am so used now to (just for you LEXX) kph that I don't even think about the translation any more. Happy Flying, all the best, LongHorn

Tully__
11-13-2004, 03:25 AM
I'm not sure I agree on Lexx's comments, the standard abbreviations are:

mph = Miles per hour
km/h= Kilometres per hour
kts = knots / nautical miles per hour.

If everyone stuck to the standards there'd be no confusion. As I somewhat overstressed in my last post, 1 nm/h is the same as 1 knot. An amount expressed in knots is already a speed, there's no need to add a "per hour" to it. If you do, it becomes an acceleration, not a speed.