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dbuff
07-28-2006, 10:44 AM
My Grandaddy served on the USS MacKenzie DD614.
Was interesting to find their sub story on the internet.

The Sinking of the U-182

On 16 May, 1943, the MacKenzie (Commander D.B. "Dan" Miller) was enroute to Casablanca in company with destroyer Laub, whose captain, Commander J. F. Gallaher, was senior officer of the two-destroyer task unit.

At 0350 the MacKenzie had a radar contact on her SG radar, range 7,800 yards. At 2,500 yards the radar contact was lost, but a good sound contact was established at 1,600 yards. The MacKenzie made a run on the submarine, dropping a 10-charge pattern at 0439.

While the destroyer turned to make a second attack, Sound reported contact at 500 yards. Miller ordered five more depth charges dumped upon the enemy. The barrage raised the usual geyser followed by a spreading maelstrom, then silence.

For some time thereafter the MacKenzie and Laub searched in the vicinity. But attempts to regain contact with the target proved futile. However, at 0458 and at 0503 both destroyers heard marine explosions, similar to the blast of deep depth charges. The destroyers searched for wreckage but found nothing. No scraps of submarine; no oil slicks. Turning their bows for Casablanca, the destroyers proceeded on their way.

The wreck left by the MacKenzie's handiwork was not located until after the war, when it was found in the vicinity of lat. 33-55 N., long. 20-35 W, -- in the Kriegsmarines's records. The submarine that disappeared in that locale early in the morning of 16 May 1943, was the one sunk by the MacKenzie. The records identified the victim as the U-182.

(from U.S. Destroyers Operations in World War II - Roscoe)

dbuff
07-28-2006, 10:44 AM
My Grandaddy served on the USS MacKenzie DD614.
Was interesting to find their sub story on the internet.

The Sinking of the U-182

On 16 May, 1943, the MacKenzie (Commander D.B. "Dan" Miller) was enroute to Casablanca in company with destroyer Laub, whose captain, Commander J. F. Gallaher, was senior officer of the two-destroyer task unit.

At 0350 the MacKenzie had a radar contact on her SG radar, range 7,800 yards. At 2,500 yards the radar contact was lost, but a good sound contact was established at 1,600 yards. The MacKenzie made a run on the submarine, dropping a 10-charge pattern at 0439.

While the destroyer turned to make a second attack, Sound reported contact at 500 yards. Miller ordered five more depth charges dumped upon the enemy. The barrage raised the usual geyser followed by a spreading maelstrom, then silence.

For some time thereafter the MacKenzie and Laub searched in the vicinity. But attempts to regain contact with the target proved futile. However, at 0458 and at 0503 both destroyers heard marine explosions, similar to the blast of deep depth charges. The destroyers searched for wreckage but found nothing. No scraps of submarine; no oil slicks. Turning their bows for Casablanca, the destroyers proceeded on their way.

The wreck left by the MacKenzie's handiwork was not located until after the war, when it was found in the vicinity of lat. 33-55 N., long. 20-35 W, -- in the Kriegsmarines's records. The submarine that disappeared in that locale early in the morning of 16 May 1943, was the one sunk by the MacKenzie. The records identified the victim as the U-182.

(from U.S. Destroyers Operations in World War II - Roscoe)

Celeon999
07-28-2006, 01:25 PM
In which depth is the wreckage ?


Sound like they were damaged lost depth control and were crushed by the water pressure.