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View Full Version : Mosquito crash 11 years ago....truly awful



The.Tyke
05-26-2007, 09:15 AM
My heart goes out to all those who are killed or injured at airshows, but this one is really awful. You can just feel for the crew trying to regain control of the aircraft. First time I've seen it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ag5ut3tP3ZM&mode=related&search=

XyZspineZyX
05-26-2007, 09:21 AM
I prefer to watch this video of it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgijBdX-yPk

msalama
05-26-2007, 09:34 AM
Indeed http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

CanonUK
05-26-2007, 09:51 AM
What a terribly sad video http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Bewolf
05-26-2007, 09:57 AM
Darn, this is so sad. Both he pilot and the plane.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

major_setback
05-26-2007, 09:58 AM
Any ideas what went wrong?

triad773
05-26-2007, 10:00 AM
Such a tragedy. A great loss.


Originally posted by Skunk241981:
I prefer to watch this video of it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgijBdX-yPk

Or, even better
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp0486rsaAM

Such a beautiful piece of work.

XyZspineZyX
05-26-2007, 10:02 AM
Looking at the footage...I guess he just stalled it. Even the most common of errors can get the most experienced pilot. Sad really.

Freelancer-1
05-26-2007, 10:10 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YOhZEsIq85E&mode=related&search=

Viper2005_
05-26-2007, 10:19 AM
Originally posted by major_setback:
Any ideas what went wrong?

http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources/dft_avsafety_pdf_501355.pdf

The.Tyke
05-26-2007, 10:21 AM
Apparently the carbs had just been replaced, the left engine cuts out due to fuel starvation. This causes a yaw to the left, wing drop and too low to recover. The British Aerospace chief test pilot died in the crash along with another company employee. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

JG52Uther
05-26-2007, 10:28 AM
Not nice http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

RegRag1977
05-26-2007, 10:38 AM
I hate to see such things...

Poor pilot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Kurfurst__
05-26-2007, 11:32 AM
This one is even worser though.... Spit XIV looping... appearantly misjudged the altitude.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy5NfpCoprQ

T_O_A_D
05-26-2007, 12:36 PM
Terrible thing to happen, But as pointed out below this video is really well done and shot.
Too bad the equipment of the day, wasn't up to par as todays standards for filming. Still though this guy made a masterpiece.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp0486rsaAM&mode=related&search=
Were are so lucky we don't have so much trouble starting them in Game. Vulchers would really own the game if so.


Originally posted by triad773:
Such a tragedy. A great loss.

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Skunk241981:
I prefer to watch this video of it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OgijBdX-yPk

Or, even better
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp0486rsaAM

Such a beautiful piece of work. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Taylortony
05-26-2007, 01:21 PM
Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
This one is even worser though.... Spit XIV looping... appearantly misjudged the altitude.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy5NfpCoprQ

The Spitfire was the Rolls Royce MK 14 and it is on its way to being rebuilt, will be airworthy in about a year to two in time, fuselage etc is complete... the engine that was prepped for it has gone into the MK19, so they are prepping the other spare for it as that will take a few months to get everything checked and sorted......

The Mossie was indeed fuel problems do to an incorrectly assembled item.

major_setback
05-26-2007, 01:38 PM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
This one is even worser though.... Spit XIV looping... appearantly misjudged the altitude.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy5NfpCoprQ

The Spitfire was the Rolls Royce MK 14 and it is on its way to being rebuilt, will be airworthy in about a year to two in time, fuselage etc is complete... the engine that was prepped for it has gone into the MK19, so they are prepping the other spare for it as that will take a few months to get everything checked and sorted......

The Mossie was indeed fuel problems do to an incorrectly assembled item. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'm surprised that anything was left of it. Would they have been able to use many/any of the original parts, or would it be a re-build in name only?

Warrington_Wolf
05-26-2007, 01:58 PM
That was awful to watch http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif.

luftluuver
05-26-2007, 04:00 PM
A wiki article from which I got the following said the Mossie stalled.

Several potential restorations to airworthiness exist. A flying replica using new wood but otherwise original parts is under construction in New Zealand. Another in New Zealand is being restored for American collector Jerry Yagen, and it is highly likely that this will become the first airworthy Mosquito since 1996. The Mosquito B 35 held in the Experimental Aircraft Association, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, USA was airworthy when Kermit Weeks, the owner, loaned it to the museum.

The Canadian Historical Aircraft Association (CHAA) based in Windsor, Ontario is building a Mosquito from scratch. Glyn Powell located in Papakura, New Zealand has built a mould for the wooden fuselage, and CHAA bought the very first one ever sold. They have two unused engines still in the crates and some parts retrieved from a crash in the Arctic.

Another sad, and tragic, crash.

A Mosquito IX also holds the record for the most missions flown by an Allied bomber in the Second World War. LR503, "F for Freddie," first serving with 109 and subsequently 105 Squadron, flew 213 sorties during the war, only to crash on 10 May 1945, two days after VE Day at Calgary airport during a victory tour, an accident attributed to pilot error.

Mosquito B. IX bomber, LR503 and RAF code GB-F, flew combat missions first in No. 109 Squadron beginning on May 28, 1943, and later in 105 Squadron.

Taylortony
05-26-2007, 05:32 PM
Originally posted by major_setback:
I'm surprised that anything was left of it. Would they have been able to use many/any of the original parts, or would it be a re-build in name only?

You seem to be under the false assumption that these Spitfires you see flying around are old Warbirds...... let me pop that bubble once and for all..... A lot of them simply are not, I have seen several Spits being rebuilt in my time over the years and by the time finished one example had the Data Plate and a leading edge on one wing original, the rest of the structure was new, but it is a genuine warbird as it has been rebuilt........ strange but that is how it goes,

The Mk 14 was bad, I was able to view the remains post crash in it's hanger, the fuselage was a flattened oval, but it was pretty much all there just badly destroyed....

Before the accident the wings had been Xrayed for corrosion and cracking etc and nothing was found, The RAF I believe xrayed one of theirs using the same technique and that was OK as well, as with many aircraft of the time they were constructed with Magnesium based rivets and these are known to corrode internally, the RAF had decided to pull the skins on the Spit they had Xrayed and when the skins were removed the wing spar was found to be cracked so it was renewed.... Rolls decided to respar theirs as well at the time because of the RAF findings and this was the state of play when it crashed... the original spars had been retained and out of an aircraft they were put into an xray bath and checked again, they were found to be servicable, so these, the original wartime spars are being incorporated into the rebuilt wings, the new items being destroyed in the crash.... but there will be quite a bit of the old one that goes into the rebuild.

Taylortony
05-26-2007, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by luftluuver:
A wiki article from which I got the following said the Mossie stalled.



yes it did, but the cause of that was loss of engine power on the port side... I get all the AAIB reports sent to me as part of my job...

OK the Air Accident Investigation Branch Findings and report for the Mossie crash is readable here...

http://www.aaib.gov.uk/cms_resources/dft_avsafety_pdf_501355.pdf

luftluuver
05-26-2007, 06:10 PM
Thanks http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

rnzoli
05-26-2007, 06:50 PM
it's quite interesting that in the absence of sufficient wreckage evidence (and of course, no black box of any sort), the video footages and eyewitness accounts played a key role to determine the most probably cause of the stall and crash

DKoor
05-26-2007, 08:29 PM
I'm sorry but every single one of those is a pilot's fault.
Unless there are some engine/structural failures.
Which I believe weren't the cause in majority of such cases.

It would be wrong if I say I know why that happened, but my best guess is pilot panicked and started to pull the stick too soon without enough airspeed. Maybe just maybe he could make it if he immediately stabilized ac waited for last moment then pull up. And not going in such hard climb.

But most likely not, he'd crash because of too low alt...... very sad.

Anyone knows how many flyables are left?

Taylortony
05-26-2007, 08:49 PM
Originally posted by DKoor:
I'm sorry but every single one of those is a pilot's fault.
Unless there are some engine/structural failures.
Which I believe weren't the cause in majority of such cases.

It would be wrong if I say I know why that happened, but my best guess is pilot panicked and started to pull the stick too soon without enough airspeed. Maybe just maybe he could make it if he immediately stabilized ac waited for last moment then pull up. And not going in such hard climb.

But most likely not, he'd crash because of too low alt...... very sad.

Anyone knows how many flyables are left?


Errr read the report because your last post makes you sound a bit ermmmm wrong in the case of the mossie.... One Engine lost power in one of the most crucial areas of the display... and the other engine just took him to the crash site..

HellToupee
05-26-2007, 09:47 PM
he couldnt pull up untill it had suffient speed, else it would have just kept spinning. U only have limited control at that low speed not much they could have done on one engine.

Badsight-
05-27-2007, 12:30 AM
horrible seconds of terror

horrible

rnzoli
05-27-2007, 02:04 AM
the report says that the pilot had relatively small amount of hours flown with that type

this is typical problems with old warbirds

you have thousands of hours in contemporary types, there are recurrend simulator trainings and check rides

with old birds, the amount of hours pilots fly is much much less, and tthe emergency situations are not possible to practice so well

dave123456789
05-27-2007, 05:33 AM
Those videos are awful to watch, I hate to think what would be going through the pilots head seconds before impact. Also, what makes it worse is that in the mozzies crash you can see him trying to regain control, another 20 or so meter higher and it looks like he would of recovered... very sad.

major_setback
05-27-2007, 06:39 AM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by major_setback:
I'm surprised that anything was left of it. Would they have been able to use many/any of the original parts, or would it be a re-build in name only?

You seem to be under the false assumption that these Spitfires you see flying around are old Warbirds...... let me pop that bubble once and for all..... A lot of them simply are not, I have seen several Spits being rebuilt in my time over the years and by the time finished one example had the Data Plate and a leading edge on one wing original, the rest of the structure was new, but it is a genuine warbird as it has been rebuilt........ strange but that is how it goes,

The Mk 14 was bad, I was able to view the remains post crash in it's hanger, the fuselage was a flattened oval, but it was pretty much all there just badly destroyed....

Before the accident the wings had been Xrayed for corrosion and cracking etc and nothing was found, The RAF I believe xrayed one of theirs using the same technique and that was OK as well, as with many aircraft of the time they were constructed with Magnesium based rivets and these are known to corrode internally, the RAF had decided to pull the skins on the Spit they had Xrayed and when the skins were removed the wing spar was found to be cracked so it was renewed.... Rolls decided to respar theirs as well at the time because of the RAF findings and this was the state of play when it crashed... the original spars had been retained and out of an aircraft they were put into an xray bath and checked again, they were found to be servicable, so these, the original wartime spars are being incorporated into the rebuilt wings, the new items being destroyed in the crash.... but there will be quite a bit of the old one that goes into the rebuild. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks.

Jagdgeschwader2
05-27-2007, 07:11 AM
Oh man that is just awful. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif That engine just cut out at the wrong place and time. Not blaming the pilot, but I do believe those types of maneuvers should be avoided at such a low alt. Especially with such a rare aircraft. High powered twins require serious respect and training by the pilots who fly them. Jeff Ethell was killed in a similar accident while flying a P-38L. In this case it was the pilot's fault for allowing one engine to run out of fuel. He went into a more severe spin than the Mosquito did. He was also at low alt and could not recover. I would be happy if they just made low speed and level passes at airshows. It seems to me that they take too many risks. Just my opinion.

Here is the Ethell P-38 crash report.

http://www.ntsb.gov/NTSB/brief2.asp?ev_id=20001208X0824...no=SEA97FA130&akey=1 (http://www.ntsb.gov/NTSB/brief2.asp?ev_id=20001208X08240&ntsbno=SEA97FA130&akey=1)

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s3.jpg

WOLFMondo
05-27-2007, 10:40 AM
Originally posted by DKoor:


Anyone knows how many flyables are left?

There are no flying Mossies left. Theres a plan to make a 100% replica and another to restore one to flying condition. Like 109's, there so rare I really don't think they should be flown.

BOA_Allmenroder
05-27-2007, 10:57 AM
Originally posted by rnzoli:
the report says that the pilot had relatively small amount of hours flown with that type

this is typical problems with old warbirds

you have thousands of hours in contemporary types, there are recurrend simulator trainings and check rides

with old birds, the amount of hours pilots fly is much much less, and tthe emergency situations are not possible to practice so well

Actually your comment above also explains the very high training loss rate experienced in the WW2 era. Those pilots often transitioned into very high performance a/c, compared to their training a/c, 'solo'. While they might have had many many hours in the lower performing a/c, nothing save experience really prepared them for the high performance a/c they would actually operate.

This resulted in a very high training loss rates that I think all pilot vets, from all nations in WW2 comment on when talking about their training.

In Tampa, FL, the current site of MacDIll AFB was, among other things, a B26 training base in WW2. The saying was 'one a day in Tampa Bay' and that didn't mean fishing boats.

What we see in that video probably occured to many many pilots in many many a/c....showing off, getting yourself in a fix, and well, we see the rest. The ones that survived stuff like that were lucky, learned from the experience, and became better pilots.

Remember the old saying:

'There are old pilot and there are bold pilots. But there are no old and bold pilots.'

Xiolablu3
05-27-2007, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by major_setback:
Any ideas what went wrong?

the official crash report states: The investigation established that the accident resulted from a loss of control of the aircraft
associated with a temporary loss of power from the left engine. The investigation of the carburetors revealed that neither unit met the specified fuel flow
requirements under negative g conditions,as the adjustable stops that controlled the float height
(which in turn controlled the float valve) were not even contacting the valve links.

Taylortony
05-27-2007, 11:11 AM
Kermits is I believe kept in an airworthy condition but not flown........ shame really

THe Ex Spartan one in Canada is coming along and I believe the engines have gone off for overhaul....... though it has been sold

http://www.mossie.org/VR796.htm

one on the way to flying condition

http://www.mossie.org/KA114.htm

another on its way back into the air

http://www.mossie.org/A52-600.htm

and another

http://www.mossie.org/NZ2308.htm

DKoor
05-27-2007, 11:15 AM
Originally posted by WOLFMondo:
There are no flying Mossies left. Theres a plan to make a 100% replica and another to restore one to flying condition. Like 109's, there so rare I really don't think they should be flown. That's a bad thing. Very bad.
Mosquito is one of my favorite ac, but of course not only for that..... there is only one Zero left too (original flyworthy) AFAIK.
Very bad thing to lose genuine WW2 ac.

But exact replicas should be made if possible. For us WW2 aero-nuts http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Nice links TT http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

ddpairborne59
05-27-2007, 11:26 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Taylortony:
Kermits is I believe kept in an airworthy condition but not flown........ shame really

THe Ex Spartan one in Canada is coming along and I believe the engines have gone off for overhaul....... though it has been sold

http://www.mossie.org/VR796.htm

That is so cool! I didnt know. I live in Vancouver, BC.


The loss of life and beauty,Sad.

Taylortony
05-27-2007, 11:53 AM
don't know if it has moved, as the new owner was still going to rebuild it to fly and is in Canada too

VFS-214_Hawk
05-27-2007, 12:50 PM
So when are these pilots gonna stop being STUPID?

major_setback
05-27-2007, 01:05 PM
Originally posted by Jagdgeschwader2:
Oh man that is just awful. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif That engine just cut out at the wrong place and time. Not blaming the pilot, but I do believe those types of maneuvers should be avoided at such a low alt. Especially with such a rare aircraft. High powered twins require serious respect and training by the pilots who fly them. Jeff Ethell was killed in a similar accident while flying a P-38L. In this case it was the pilot's fault for allowing one engine to run out of fuel. He went into a more severe spin than the Mosquito did. He was also at low alt and could not recover. I would be happy if they just made low speed and level passes at airshows. It seems to me that they take too many risks. Just my opinion.





I hate to say it, because I love airshows (and will be att Duxford for the third year running in July http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif), but I agree.
No need for the dramatic, the planes are dramatic enough as it is without the fancy stuff.
I think it's asking too much to expect these aircraf to be repaired/built to a faultless level, considdering what the people restoring them have to work with ie. no production spare parts available).
...There is so very much at stake.

Rjel
05-27-2007, 03:10 PM
It always makes me wonder why so often the pilots ride these warbirds all the way down. I can appreciate if they are trying to keep those on the ground away from danger, but as valuable as the A/C are they aren't worth anyone's life. I know a lot of the crashes at airshows are low level. Maybe that's where the some of the problems begin. No room for errors. I agree just seeing the planes is dramatic enough, there isn't any need for low level aerobatics to please a crowd that really isn't savvy enough to even know what they're seeing.

EiZ0N
05-27-2007, 03:17 PM
Do they have ejector seats in these old warbirds?

berg417448
05-27-2007, 03:22 PM
Originally posted by EiZ0N:
Do they have ejector seats in these old warbirds?

No. Most WWII aircraft did not have them.

Taylortony
05-27-2007, 03:57 PM
Originally posted by Rjel:
It always makes me wonder why so often the pilots ride these warbirds all the way down. I can appreciate if they are trying to keep those on the ground away from danger, but as valuable as the A/C are they aren't worth anyone's life. I know a lot of the crashes at airshows are low level. Maybe that's where the some of the problems begin. No room for errors. I agree just seeing the planes is dramatic enough, there isn't any need for low level aerobatics to please a crowd that really isn't savvy enough to even know what they're seeing.

At that height you simply do not have an option... also the way it was rotating, even if you did have an option I would doubt you would be able to egress from the aircraft easily..

As for the low level aero bit well if you look at it again he was simply at the top of a level pass and doing a roll where speed was critical and not performing any serois stuff...... The same could be said for take off, where if you lose an engine the other one will just take you to the crash site as well.

Jasko76
05-27-2007, 03:58 PM
Originally posted by Rjel:
It always makes me wonder why so often the pilots ride these warbirds all the way down.

I just don't think he had any choice. Or, he may have thought he could pull it out somehow. In fact, and this is so tragic, he basically had the Mossie under control in the end, except the altitude was insufficient. I'm with those who think that warbirds should be flown gently. That way, they'll last longer (less airframe stress etc) and danger of fatal crashes will be reduced greatly. I much prefer to see them fly gently than not fly at all, or much wors crash!

Taylortony
05-27-2007, 04:09 PM
Originally posted by major_setback:
[I think it's asking too much to expect these aircraf to be repaired/built to a faultless level, considering what the people restoring them have to work with ie. no production spare parts available).
...There is so very much at stake.

The majority are maintained to a higher standard than most stuff in the air today.... spares do not tend to be such an issue, problem parts on the spit such as wheels are back in manufacture if reqd and the RAF BOBMF have just had Dunlop dust off the moulds and remanufacture a bunch of new Spit tyres...

You can buy a Mustang in parts off the shelf today in the US if you wanted to build a new one, the likes of new wings and fuselages etc are readily available...

But if you want to buy a window frame for a Cessna 152 you cannot, as they no longer manufacture them, have the tooling for them, and have no stock...... I know I asked

Altocirrus
05-27-2007, 04:18 PM
To be honest, I wasn't sure whether to watch that video or not. I always hate seeing a plane go down, and this is one I remember. I was only 8 when it crashed, but I remember the look on my dad's face when it was announced on the radio. The mossie was his favourite plane.

I think it was a difficult plane to escape from at the best of times, so I think the pilot really had no chance but to attempt a recovery.

As much as I love airshows, I do find it difficult to watch pilots push the limits in vintage aircraft. Fine in Extras, Sukhois etc, but as has been said, there's too much as stake here. If I remember correctly that Firefly that went down a few years ago was just trying to impress the crowd.

hkg36sd
05-27-2007, 09:48 PM
AS horrible as it is to some to watch, it is the best reminder to those who fly these birds of what can go wrong when in the cockpit. It is also a reminder to all how fragile and still unpredictable these aircraft were and are. You can imagine, these aircraft are meticulously maintained and fly very 'clean' with (usually) no weapons or ammo. Now think of typical WW2 combat conditions, the vast myriad of ability and skill of the average combat pilot, unpredictable weather, etc.....

Xiolablu3
05-28-2007, 09:34 AM
A pilot in WW2 doing these manouvres at that low level would be grounded. So its a bit daft for these display pilots to do the same thing.

He had probably done that roll 20 or 30 times with no problems, it was just a freak occurance that it happened at just the wrong time, however thats all it takes.

I htink more care should certainl;y be taken when there are only 1 or 2 flying examples in the world. However there are enough SPits and P51's to hammer them in displays.

Plus these aircraft seem to be reliable enough that they only crash once in a blue moon, unlike say the Bf109 or Mossies that seem a bit accident prone. No sooner is there one flying that its crashed again.

Philipscdrw
05-28-2007, 11:09 AM
About bailing out - he had a passenger on board. Assuming he was wearing a parachute he'd either have to get the passenger to bail out first or he'd have to leave the aircraft with the (presumably unqualified) passenger to follow as best he could.

slo_1_2_3
05-28-2007, 03:42 PM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
This one is even worser though.... Spit XIV looping... appearantly misjudged the altitude.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gy5NfpCoprQ

The Spitfire was the Rolls Royce MK 14 and it is on its way to being rebuilt, will be airworthy in about a year to two in time, fuselage etc is complete... the engine that was prepped for it has gone into the MK19, so they are prepping the other spare for it as that will take a few months to get everything checked and sorted......

The Mossie was indeed fuel problems do to an incorrectly assembled item. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Did the pilot survive that?

Taylortony
05-28-2007, 04:03 PM
No.........

Taylortony
05-28-2007, 04:14 PM
But accidents happen in many a walks of life...... to stop doing something you love and brings pleasure to others simply means life is not worth living...........

Of all the tragedies and films I have witnessed, the ones below are perhaps some of the saddest........ they were fighting a war and had survived, yet in a fleeting moment they were gone, never to see their loved ones again......... the futility of their loss having survived wartime operations to be lost like this is one of the saddest thing that struck me about it all.......

If you wish to view this incident please see the link below

http://www.alexisparkinn.com/photogallery/Videos/2006-3-31_Beaufort_Crash.mpeg

A flight of three World War II Royal Australian (not British) Air Force Beauforts perform a picture-perfect low pass for the cameras when something goes terribly wrong.
"Lest we forget, the two Beauforts A9-27 and A9-268, of the RAAF's 8 OTU, collided over Jervis Bay on 14 April 1943 while performing a 'Prince of Wales' break for people of the media."

"All eight crew members were killed when both aircraft hit the water: Crew of A9-27 F/O Raymond Sydney Green (Pilot), F/O Maurice Francis Hoban, F/Sgt Eric William Sweetnam, Sgt Albert John Bailey. Crew of A9-268 F/Lt David George Dey (Pilot), P/O Jack Norman, P/O Rex Lindsay Solomon, Sgt Hugh Sydney George Richardson."

slo_1_2_3
05-28-2007, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
No......... But the plane is almost restord? To bad they can't do that with people

Taylortony
05-28-2007, 05:09 PM
Originally posted by slo_1_2_3:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Taylortony:
No......... But the plane is almost restord? To bad they can't do that with people </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, I believe there was a lot of discussion whether to do it or not, so they asked the family and they said yes, he would have wanted it that way.... so it is being rebuilt...