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p-11.cAce
07-21-2010, 08:28 AM
Ok you skillful craftsmen I'm hoping you can help me out here http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif My simpit is covered in pieces of luan that butt together, but thanks to my lack of skills a few of the joints have some gaps. Some of the joints are edge on and others are at an angle. I've done some drywall work and thought of taping and mudding the joints to get a smooth surface to paint - but I thing if I do that the dried mud will just crack off when I move the pit to the den from the garage.
So what could I use to cover the gaps and achieve a smooth finish to paint that won't break away from the luan?

voyager_663rd
07-21-2010, 09:21 AM
Can you use L-brackets inside to pull the gaps closed?

Depending on the thickness though, screws may be impractical unless you put some "trim" on the outside to screw into and pull it all into place.

p-11.cAce
07-21-2010, 09:30 AM
Each panel is screwed to a pvc framework with self tapping screws and washers. The plans called for framework to be covered with polystyrene but I do not have to access to the proper thickness so I went with the luan.
Here is completed frame with the center section covered:
http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c99/acmeaviator/006.jpg

I have the front and rear sections partially covered - will post up pics later.

voyager_663rd
07-21-2010, 10:29 AM
Why not attach the panels to each other minimizing the gap THEN attach it to the pvc.

May just require filling existing holes with plastic wood and re-drilling.

Trying to fill any gaps with any type of filler will not work (when moving it).

ALTERNATIVE:

Maybe enlarge the gap slightly in a -V- shape (using a router, after it's assembled) and glue a piece of tri-stock into the V-gap. Will give you somewhat rounded corners and so won't be as sharp.

Messaschnitzel
07-21-2010, 10:34 AM
My suggestion would be like Voyager's, except that trying to fit L-brackets to the angle you got would be problematic. What I would do is make some simple 18 gauge brackets made to match the angle you got on the panels and tubing. draw a pattern with two oblique triangles with the hypotenuse of each triangle laying agaist each other to form a mirror image. Then after the shape is cut out, bend the metal along the hypotenuse to make your bracket. If you want, you could extend a flange off the back of one of the short angles of the metal bracket to make an arm bent at 90 degrees to reinforce the end piece on the horizontal wooden arm panel laying perpendicular to the vertical wood panel. Also, I would screw the brackets from the outside using countersunk screws so they be laying flush with the wood, and then you could use wood putty to fill the gaps and cover the countersunk screws flush.

p-11.cAce
07-21-2010, 10:44 AM
My suggestion would be like Voyager's, except that trying to fit L-brackets to the angle you got would be problematic. What I would do is make some simple 18 gauge brackets made to match the angle you got on the panels. draw a pattern with two oblique triangles with the hypotenuse of each triangle laying agaist each other to form a mirror image. Then after the shape is cut out, bend the metal along the hypotenuse to make your bracket. If you want, you could extend a flange off the back of one of the short angles of the metal bracket to make an arm bent at 90 degrees to reinforce the end piece on the horizontal wooden arm panel laying perpendicular to the vertical wood panel. Also, I would screw the brackets from the outside using countersunk screws so they be laying flush with the wood, and then you could use wood putty to fill the gaps and cover the countersunk screws flush.

Amazingly enough I follow what you are saying http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif I think that both of the suggestions to use brackets to mount the panels are better than trying to attach the luan directly to the pvc as I have been. The plans call for you to basically wrap the framework in polystyrene foam that is then glued to the pvc but I wanted something more substantial. Another option that I have been kicking around is pop-riveting some thin gauge sheetmetal to the frame. It would look awesome but I have even less experience with metal than with wood.

x6BL_Brando
07-21-2010, 10:52 AM
Two points occur to me.

If you plan to move the whole pit as one piece then you are sure to get a lot of flexion because of the nature of the framing, which appears to be poly-tubing. No method of filling the joints will withstand the forces unless you temporarily reinforce the piece before moving it.

Also, I'm guessing that you don't plan to be applying any paint once the pit is in your den?

B

p-11.cAce
07-21-2010, 11:11 AM
I'll be finishing it in the garage then moving it. It is built as 3 pieces - a nose section, a mid section, and a tail unit - and the framing is all schedule 40 which is much sturdier than you would think!
I'm going to give the brackets a go and will post up some pics this afternoon or this evening when I get home.

Messaschnitzel
07-21-2010, 11:37 AM
Originally posted by p-11.cAce:
Amazingly enough I follow what you are saying http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif I think that both of the suggestions to use brackets to mount the panels are better than trying to attach the luan directly to the pvc as I have been. The plans call for you to basically wrap the framework in polystyrene foam that is then glued to the pvc but I wanted something more substantial. Another option that I have been kicking around is pop-riveting some thin gauge sheetmetal to the frame. It would look awesome but I have even less experience with metal than with wood.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif If you decide to go the pop rivet route, you could lay out the lines on the metal and center punch each point along the lines using an automatic center punch to spot the location for each hole. You can then clamp the metal firmly in position to the tubing and drill through the metal into the tubing. While the panel is still clamped in place after drilling, rivet the entire assembly using whatever size pop rivets and tool you decide to get. It will be a tedious procedure though, I will warn you ahead of time. Also, if you decide to go the sheet metal and rivet route, I advise you to take your time and be patient when laying out your pattern on the workbench. Carefully draw your lines and rivet placement marks with a thin as possible marker or pencil, and then use the automatic center punch to locate each hole. Here is a link to one:

http://www.amazon.com/Starrett...stable/dp/B0006J4Q64 (http://www.amazon.com/Starrett-18A-Automatic-Center-Adjustable/dp/B0006J4Q64)

If you have ever done a lot of center punching on metal like I have, You will soon see that this tool is worth every cent. You will then find that when you use the drill, that it will automatically center itself and make a clean hole through both the metal and one side of the tubing. My advice is to use as small a drill bit diameter as possible that will allow the pop rivet shank to pass through so as to not allow the rivet to work itself loose after it has been installed. I know that this sounds like a lot of work, but it will pay off when it is finally done because there is nothing more evident to folks than a long row of rivets that wander off line.

I hope that this helps!

Choctaw111
07-21-2010, 11:40 AM
I have never worked with luan.
The only thing I can suggest is a support, much like a stretcher, to move the pit.

LEBillfish
07-21-2010, 12:01 PM
my suggetion in such a case is always the same.......You clearly need a bigger hammer.