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View Full Version : The P-47 - where are the units??



Philipscdrw
02-11-2007, 11:21 AM
It seems to me that none of the instruments in the P-47 cockpit have their units marked on them, except the tachometer (RPM) and fuel (gallons). Is this realistic? It's certainly ridiculous!

Your altitude is 4500. 4500 what? Meters, feet, yards, miles, inches? Rate of climb is 3. 3 what? Feet per second? Thousand feet per second? Knots?

Next thing you know, your scientists are calculating fuel in pounds while your engineers measure fuel in gallons, no-one notices the difference, and your spaceship crashes into Mars when the retro-rockets run out of fuel too early...

NonWonderDog
02-11-2007, 11:29 AM
Everything is standard US units for aircraft instrumentation. The altimeter is graduated in hundreds of feet, and the variometer is graduated in hundreds of feet per minute. It's all (except for airspeed indicators and temperature dials) very standardized among US and UK planes; I wouldn't be too surprised if the units really were left off the real things.

More likely, the units were written in tiny tiny font right up at the top of the dial; they wouldn't have been legible on the screen or in the texture file, and so they were left off.

PBNA-Boosher
02-11-2007, 01:49 PM
It is not ridiculous at all. The P-47, first of all, was not designed to be flown by n00bs like us. It was designed to be flown by pilots of the USAAC. These pilots would have been familiar with the gauges on their aircraft. They would have been tested on it. They also had SOP's and protocols. The USA (stupidly, I might add. And yes, I'm American) still uses the English system of feet, inches, miles, etc....

While it may make us go crazy at times, the model, in this case, would be correct.

Copperhead310th
02-11-2007, 02:02 PM
and if your haveing trouble understanding the layout and gauges of the P-47, i sugest taking the time to watch the ACTUAAL USAAC P-47 flight training films at Zeno's warbirds. they're great for helping learn more about the planes internal workings.

Viper2005_
02-11-2007, 02:03 PM
To be fair PBNA-Boosher, Americans may claim to use the English system, but in fact your gallons (and thus, far more importantly your pints) are undermodelled. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint

Philipscdrw
02-12-2007, 12:50 AM
Google Imagesearch is my oft-forgotten friend.
Large P-47D cockpit pic (http://www.aeronautics.ru/archive/wwii/books/cockpit/Republic%20P-47D%20Thunderbolt.jpg). OK, this aircraft has a modified panel (transponder and GPS/TCAS/navcom radio?), but the basic flight instruments appear the same as the FB ones but with units marked...

Edit: But certain CFS3 P-47s also have, for instance, the unmarked VSI. Either they've copied FB or some of the real aircraft really did have unmarked instruments.

Hrdina
02-12-2007, 10:42 AM
Originally posted by Viper2005_:
To be fair PBNA-Boosher, Americans may claim to use the English system, but in fact your gallons (and thus, far more importantly your pints) are undermodelled. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pint
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif
Yes, our undermodelled pints are a terrible thing!

BillyTheKid_22
02-12-2007, 11:32 AM
http://www.airbum.com/photos/HP-47D-40silverleftturn.jpg




www.airbum.com (http://www.airbum.com)


http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

flox
02-12-2007, 04:56 PM
On a somewhat similar note, what is the ideal engine RPM? On most American birds it's 3000RPM but if memory serves, there's no marking on the tach to denote that. Anyone?