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Blackjack04
10-04-2005, 03:09 PM
Would anyone know of any web site where I can get a list of Browning .50 cal serial numbers that were used during WWII. These weapons may have been produced under licence by a different company. Thanks.

Texas LongHorn
10-05-2005, 12:45 AM
Hey Blackjack, while not exactly what you are looking for, one of these sites may have some very useful info, here's the link, and don't blame ME if you don't get any sleep tonight <ggg.>
http://nauticom.net/www/harts/airforce.html
All the best, LongHorn

Blackjack04
10-05-2005, 02:48 PM
Thanks for that info LH. Have had a brief look but so far no luck, but will keep checking. Hope some other kind reader may be able to help.

chris455
10-05-2005, 10:28 PM
Any particular reason you need the numbers? Just asking.

Blackjack04
10-06-2005, 09:33 PM
My brother who operates a live aboard dive operation in Papua New Guinea has located a P40. There is no ID available from the wreckage as it is badly damaged and no info available about aircraft going down in the area. However, he was told one may be able to trace an aircraft ID from serial numbers from the guns. He is still waiting on info from various other sources as to the ID.

Waldo.Pepper
10-07-2005, 03:17 AM
Originally posted by Blackjack04:
My brother who operates a live aboard dive operation in Papua New Guinea has located a P40. There is no ID available from the wreckage as it is badly damaged and no info available about aircraft going down in the area. However, he was told one may be able to trace an aircraft ID from serial numbers from the guns. He is still waiting on info from various other sources as to the ID.

I think looking for serial numbers of the guns as an avenue of determining the plane is a fruitless waste of your time. The guns are too interchangable and would likely get swapped from plane to plane during the course of its lifetime.

VVaFFenPanZZeR
10-07-2005, 06:37 AM
Not really waldo, when I was in the service we always had the same weapons, and that is to keep that crew responsible for their own equipment, if u broke it of f'ed it up then its ur prob, their not interchangable for that reason, I could bust my weapon then next time thier taken out to be cleaned I get a new 1 , neg and som1 else gets mine, I'd keep the search going.

Waldo.Pepper
10-07-2005, 06:56 AM
Originally posted by VVaFFenPanZZeR:
Not really waldo, when I was in the service we always had the same weapons, and that is to keep that crew responsible for their own equipment, if u broke it of f'ed it up then its ur prob, their not interchangable for that reason, I could bust my weapon then next time thier taken out to be cleaned I get a new 1 , neg and som1 else gets mine, I'd keep the search going.

Thanks for sharing your experience/opinion. I think it differs from the practice during WW2.

I was thinking of suggesting that the engine numbers be used. But that too may prove to be problematic. I think that it would be wise to collect ALL writen/stamped information that is available on the wreck and use it all if you can.

PlaneEater
10-07-2005, 02:47 PM
Tell him to look for the manufacturer's plate in the cockpit. DON'T REMOVE IT. Please.

It'll have everything you need.

Cragger
10-07-2005, 10:33 PM
PlaneEater is correct look for the Manufacturer Plate in the cockpit. Anything else is not a verifiable means of identifing a war wrecked crate.

The reason being is that parts where always in short supply, especially in that region and alot of the pacific around the time P-40s where a major portion of the allied air power. When a crate came in to shot up or had to belly her in, ground loop, etc. It was generally dissassembled and stripped 'canabilized' for parts to keep other aircraft flying and combat worthy. The only verfiable means is the plate identifing by serial number the manufacturor number of the fuselage and internal frame of the aircraft itself before it was 'rigged' with everything to make it airworthy after it got off the line.

Blackjack04
10-07-2005, 11:45 PM
Thanks for all the input guys. I did mention that the crate was badly damaged with no ID available. The ID plate was the first thing looked for. I did not mention that the craft lies in 15 metres of water in a high current area, so corrosion is also a problem. It looks like official sources are still the best bet. Thanks again for all your comments.