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View Full Version : Dont Touch Aircraft - Wing Slaved On.



Hanglands
05-07-2007, 02:27 PM
Hi,

I saw this sign stuck on a wing in one of the hangars at Duxford recently. I found it quite funny :

http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m203/ChickenHawk_2006/duxsign.jpg

I had visions of somebody didnt know what 'slaved' meant (I didnt!) knocking the wing off and an irrate engineer have to write the meaning on the notice with said wing at his feet. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Regards.

Friendly_flyer
05-07-2007, 03:45 PM
For us non-natives, what does really "slaved on" mean?

FPSOLKOR
05-07-2007, 04:08 PM
Old joke in Russian airfoce - insignia @do not work without MAT@ (for non-speakers mat means either matt or swearing.

XyZspineZyX
05-07-2007, 04:36 PM
Originally posted by Friendly_flyer:
For us non-natives, what does really "slaved on" mean?

When you or somebody else "slaves on" something, that person has tirelessly worked a great deal on it. The last time you worked extra-hard cleaning the kitchen floor, scrubbing and waxing?

You "slaved on" the floor

I can tell it MUST have been an engineer who wrote the adendum on that sign, because the handwriting sucks, and the phrase was begun with parenthesis, and ends with an exclamation point.

Skarphol
05-08-2007, 01:11 AM
(But what kind of plane is it?

Skarphol

The-Pizza-Man
05-08-2007, 03:10 AM
Spit 24?

raaaid
05-08-2007, 05:54 AM
yes but the funny part is whats written down slaved on as clarifying XD

i cant see it what does it say?

i see it now "slaved means stuck"

but i need still clarification on what stuck means

arent all wings stuck to the plane?

themaskedbadger
05-08-2007, 06:52 AM
I think in this context and the fact that the engineer doesn't want it touched is that the wings have been attached to the fuselage but not properly.

Stuck means to attach usually with adhesive. 'Slaved on' means to 'associate with but remain separate'.

Bearcat99
05-08-2007, 07:06 AM
Slaved as opposed to bolted.... ?

LStarosta
05-08-2007, 07:15 AM
I always thought "slaved on" meant "worked on".

As in: I slaved on that paper for 9 hours last night. etc

XyZspineZyX
05-08-2007, 08:47 AM
Originally posted by themaskedbadger:
'Slaved on' means to 'associate with but remain separate'.

Something that is "slaved" to another thing works for that thing, but has no say in what it does or why:

example:

in your car, the master cylinder tells the slave cylinders (wheel cylinders or calipers) to do their work. The Master Cylinder has the slave cylinders actuate the brakes- hence: associated with but seperate

This does not however mean that a teacher is "slaved onto" his or her school, or that a wing is "slaved on" to a fuselage.

Your example is for control and actuation. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Capt.LoneRanger
05-08-2007, 09:02 AM
You're sure?

I'm not a native English speaker, but when I read this, I interpreted rather like:

"We forced the wings to loosely stick onto the airframe for the show, so don't touch it, or they fall off immediately."

My dictionary also supports that, as "to slave" also means something like "work hard to get something done".

Just my 2 cents, though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

XyZspineZyX
05-08-2007, 09:59 AM
ug, reading comprehension is DEAD

Cap'n- no, you are right

Somebody else put some handwriting on that sign to explain what the original maker of the sign was trying to say

The original sign's message is confusing and unclear, becuase whoever made it thought "slaved" meant something it doesn't

If you "slave" one thing to another, it has to do with actuation and control. The ailerons could be (awkwardly) described as slaved to the plane, but like I say, it is a very awkward way to say that the wing is a seperate but slaved structure, right now, because it's not attached all the way yet

Very poor English no matter what

It is always disturbing to see that when a thing is put into some sort of neat, professional looking text, that so many people just assume that the sign maker was correct and knew what he or she was doing

major_setback
05-08-2007, 02:21 PM
Originally posted by BBB462cid:
ug, reading comprehension is DEAD

Cap'n- no, you are right

Somebody else put some handwriting on that sign to explain what the original maker of the sign was trying to say

The original sign's message is confusing and unclear, becuase whoever made it thought "slaved" meant something it doesn't

If you "slave" one thing to another, it has to do with actuation and control. The ailerons could be (awkwardly) described as slaved to the plane, but like I say, it is a very awkward way to say that the wing is a seperate but slaved structure, right now, because it's not attached all the way yet

Very poor English no matter what

It is always disturbing to see that when a thing is put into some sort of neat, professional looking text, that so many people just assume that the sign maker was correct and knew what he or she was doing

Yes, that's how I interpreted it too. It's a temporary fix, just 'slaved' on. But it's a very confusing way to describe the work.

Much better to say 'Don't touch' if that's what's required.

Hanglands
05-08-2007, 02:34 PM
Hi,

Its absolutely true that the word 'slaved' is past tense for 'slave', meaning to work hard, and esp for long periods.

In this case though I took the word to mean the wing was glued to the fuselage and also that the two opposing surfaces at the join were put under compression.

I dont know where the word comes from, its obviously not in any dictionary, and may just be a 'trade' term, ie used specifically by aero engineers for the technique of gluing something together in this way. Its just jargon.

I just though it was funny that they had done the gluing and rigging for the join, put a sign explicitly saying DONT TOUCH WINGS SLAVED ON and then had to explain the statement. Whatever 'slaved means, the sign still says DONT TOUCH, surely for most visitors to the hangar that would be enough.

As for the aircraft type, Im afraid I really cant remember. I'll dig through the rest of the photos I took and see if I caught it from a different angle in another shot.

Regards.

notamuppet
05-08-2007, 02:42 PM
Hello Slaved means that the part is fitted to the aircraft temporally but not finally assembled. Usually aircraft parts are painted red if they are slave items. Its quite common to fit pipework to valve and pump slaves and then finally fit the actual parts.

Hanglands
05-08-2007, 02:47 PM
Thanks Notamuppet.

Everyday is a school day http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Regards.

WarWolfe_1
05-08-2007, 04:09 PM
I've heard the term used when welding, by the old guy that has done it for 40 or 50 years (my ag fab teacher in high school), and genearly ment tack welded (or temporarily welded) to hold stuff together that was at odd angles or what not. He would say "slave it so it dosen't fall off and land on your foot you IDOIT!!! Because I'm not taking to you the Hospital!".

Taylortony
05-08-2007, 05:50 PM
Slaved on is a said by notamuppet, the wing has been offered up and either some of the correct bolts or temporary bullets have been put through to locate it, this will often be done to allow the routing of new pipework, wiring etc to be shaped and constructed during a rebuild........ the worry here is you may well have slipped a couple of the main spar bolts through but not the rear or fwd spar bolts etc, someone then standing on the wing will cause serious damage as the rear/front of the wing is not connected and the couple of bolts losely fitted can cause some serious damage.

Believe me fitting a wing can be a pig..... I replaced the wing mounting bolts on a Cessna Citation Jet and we jigged / jacked the whole aircraft so it would not move / twist before pulling the bolts, you get the plane rigged so the bolts are a smooth slide without any load on them, the old bolts slid out like 8 pints of bitter and a vindaloo after a night on the town.

The new bolts slid in 3/4 of the way then froze......... it took me 2 days to get that one mainspar bolt back out and 30 seconds to get another back in........... and that was one bolt.......

stuck on has nothing to do with adhesive it is another ex RAF slang term meaning as said they have just been shoved on or tacked on which goes back to carpentry where you would use a few tacks to located the parts before screwing, gluing or nailing the thing together


Oh and as for a bullet, this is normally a pin or indeed an old bolt that had been ground down to a curved taper on the end similar in shape to a bullet...... this is then used to align an item by feeding it in through the said orifice. it will allow you then to get the bolts surrounding it straight in...... remember these things are a close tolerance fit.......

major_setback
05-08-2007, 08:41 PM
Strange that the word isn't in most dictionaries.