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View Full Version : About my German Ex-WW2 Infantryman friend...



Xiolablu3
11-19-2007, 08:16 AM
The other thread was locked, so I will post about our conversation today here...

I found out a bit more today :-

Talked to him for a while today, however he didnt seem as talkative and he also said 'I dont really like to remember, I would rather forget' so I didnt press him too much on the subject.

He was in the 26th Infantry just in time for the Battle Of the Bulge, him and 2 other lads were put in charge of a captured Russian Mortar, 'A bloody great thing', with no ammunition.

He just kept repeating 'It was madness', 'it was madness'.

He was sent up to the front and had to walk for 2 weeks in the snow with no food or change of clothes to get there.

Their 'mortar team' (Three 17 year old lads running about with Russian mortar with no ammuntion) was given one rifle and Ammunition between them. The idea being the same as the Russian front early war. Once the guy with the rifle was shot, the other guy picked it up.

I know he was wounded, but I am not sure how or where.

Thats about all we talked about today.

I will see him again in two weeks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

He is VERY bitter towards the Nazis for getting his friends killed and also the Concentration camps.

Blutarski2004
11-19-2007, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
The other thread was locked, so I will post about our conversation today here...

I found out a bit more today :-

Talked to him for a while today, however he didnt seem as talkative and he also said 'I dont really like to remember, I would rather forget' so I didnt press him too much on the subject.

He was in the 26th Infantry just in time for the Battle Of the Bulge, him and 2 other lads were put in charge of a captured Russian Mortar, 'A bloody great thing', with no ammunition.

He just kept repeating 'It was madness', 'it was madness'.

He was sent up to the front and had to walk for 2 weeks in the snow with no food or change of clothes to get there.

Their 'mortar team' (Three 17 year old lads running about with Russian mortar with no ammuntion) was given one rifle and Ammunition between them. The idea being the same as the Russian front early war. Once the guy with the rifle was shot, the other guy picked it up.

I know he was wounded, but I am not sure how or where.

Thats about all we talked about today.

I will see him again in two weeks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

He is VERY bitter towards the Nazis for getting his friends killed and also the Concentration camps.


..... A cautionary tale for those excessively fascinated by the "glories" of war.

Thanks for taking the time to chase this down, X.

Kurfurst__
11-19-2007, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
He was in the 26th Infantry just in time for the Battle Of the Bulge, him and 2 other lads were put in charge of a captured Russian Mortar, 'A bloody great thing', with no ammunition.

OFF : Could be the Soviet 120mm M38 mortar, of which the Germans made an 1:1 copy and produced it for themselves, and used it increasingly instead of the tradational infantry guns. It`s a great piece BTW, IIRC still in use...?

Xiolablu3
11-19-2007, 01:15 PM
Could be, mate, I am not really sure.

He did stress that he had no ammuntion for it, and for that reason the 3 lads found it totally pointless and 'madness'

He said it was 'a bloody great thing', so if that fits the description!?!

Its possible that someone in higher command knew that there were German copies of this Mortar, and thats why they were given it, I am not sure.

Its quite clear that the average Infantryman at the time of the Battle Of the Bulge thought the whole operation was madness, with no chance of success, at least from his point of view. He said the feeling around the Army was one of hopelessness, but glad to not be on the Russian front.

stalkervision
11-19-2007, 01:22 PM
My favorite book about war is "Slaughter House Five" by Kurt Vonnegut. No false barvado there and the book has light parts to relieve the basic horror and insanity of war. ;

Metatron_123
11-19-2007, 01:35 PM
I love to hear about the experiences of ordinary people involved in 'big' events. I always get depressed when I think about world war two. It makes me realise we must appreciate the things most of us take for granted...

FPSOLKOR
11-19-2007, 01:40 PM
Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
OFF : Could be the Soviet 120mm M38 mortar, of which the Germans made an 1:1 copy and produced it for themselves, and used it increasingly instead of the tradational infantry guns. It`s a great piece BTW, IIRC still in use...?
Most likely 82 mm one - 120 mm was way too heavy for 3 guys to be running around with... Besides, I don't know how about Germans, but Russians used German 81 mm mine for it.