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View Full Version : Does your joystick seem to roll/rudder to the left? all the time



vladimusmaximus
06-18-2007, 12:42 PM
Is this just part of the physics engine in IL-2?? Because My MS SideWinder 2 FF, seems to always require I roll slightly right, to keep the plane flying level, I have to apply some hefty force, also rudder right usually when taking off...

Does anyone have any good profiles for the conf.ini I can use for my MS SideWinder 2 FF? Something sensitive, responsive, but not OVERLY so.

Freelancer-1
06-18-2007, 12:52 PM
It's not (likely) your stick

Engine torque causes the pull.

Trim is used to counter it.

DKoor
06-18-2007, 01:03 PM
Yes Freelancer gave you a good explanation what may happen to you.

To check it out, I suggest that you try out Tempest and 109.... if my memory serves me right 109 should slightly roll to the left while Tempest should roll to the right... all in all nothing wrong with the stick.

It's not a bug, it's a feature.

Freelancer-1
06-18-2007, 01:19 PM
Another good test that I discovered through an embarrassing incident:

Take off in an IL2 and try it again in an IL10 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

If you flip the IL10 on the runway or run it off the side and not the IL2 then it's not your stick http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

XyZspineZyX
06-18-2007, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by vladimusmaximus:
Is this just part of the physics engine in IL-2?? Because My MS SideWinder 2 FF, seems to always require I roll slightly right, to keep the plane flying level, I have to apply some hefty force, also rudder right usually when taking off...

Does anyone have any good profiles for the conf.ini I can use for my MS SideWinder 2 FF? Something sensitive, responsive, but not OVERLY so.

Hi Vlad

You are not experiencing joystick problems. What is happening is that you aren't aware of what the simulation is doing to represent the characteristics of flight in these aircraft. I answered this question just the other day

First you must know the three axes of the aircraft:

Fore and aft, or "roll" axis. The plane wants to rotate as if an axle is through the nose and out the tail. The ailerons control this

Right to left, or "pitch axis". The nose wants to rise or fall as if an axle went in the left wingtip and out the right one. The elevators control this

The up and down, or "yaw" axis. The plane noses left or right as if an axle went through the top of the canopy and out the cockpit floor. the rudder controls this

here's a quick overview of how the aircraft reacts to engine power:


Many people dont understand it, or even think about it, but as you add power, the aircraft in this sim should have a tendency to climb. Without going into an explanation of airfoils and such, just understand that in real life, with these real planes, as you add power, the nose will more or less want to go up. This is why some aircraft "fly themselves" off the runway (in general terms), and also why it is hard to grasp the notion that on landing, you control your pitch up or down with the throttle

the engine torque is also hard to picture in your head..have you ever been in an automobile, and revved the engine while in neutral, or park? the body of the car will seem to lean to one side, yes? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Well, then you already know a bit about torque roll- because this is what you're experiencing in both the sim and in the car. In a powerful car, this torque effect is pronounced and easy to feel. If there were no resistance on the wheels, the car would roll itself along it's fore and aft axis- impossible of course because the car is sitting on the Earth, but you are feeling a simple law of physics, the good old "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction"

A good example of this that I use a lot is a bicycle wheel- take the front wheel off a bicycle, and hold it by the axle, in front of you. Have somebody spin the wheel. Now, twist and turn the spinning wheel by the axles- feel the forces acting against you?

This is also why many helicopters have a "tail rotor"- it's actually the anti-torque rotor http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Now, imagine your powerful WWII piston driven aircraft...the crankshaft of the engine is in-line with your fore and aft axis. This axis is your "roll" axis- it makes one wing or the other want to rise, and the other want to fall. All the rotational mass of the large, 1,000 hp+ engine is spinning madly...driving a huge 3 or 4 bladed propeller with a 10 foot+ diameter...and it is easy to imagine the plane wanting to roll to one side! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif Thumbs Up

vladimusmaximus
06-18-2007, 06:09 PM
BBB462cid. wow, thanks for that really great explanation! I do understand now, thats really great if the planes in the game actually mimic this behavior to some degree. I figured thats what it might be http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif