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flyingbullseye
05-24-2005, 01:43 PM
Everyone, in the next two weeks, if time allows, I am planning on beginining to interview a friend of mine who flew the F6F-5 in 1944-45 aboard the USS Bennington. I have a number of questions myself however I could use as many as I can. If anyone can help with more think what you would ask if you were doing the interview. He's sharp as a tack so ask away. Thanks for any help.

Flyingbullseye

flyingbullseye
05-24-2005, 01:43 PM
Everyone, in the next two weeks, if time allows, I am planning on beginining to interview a friend of mine who flew the F6F-5 in 1944-45 aboard the USS Bennington. I have a number of questions myself however I could use as many as I can. If anyone can help with more think what you would ask if you were doing the interview. He's sharp as a tack so ask away. Thanks for any help.

Flyingbullseye

AerialTarget
05-24-2005, 01:57 PM
Give him a copy of the game. I'll chip in, if I have to.

jb5150
05-24-2005, 02:42 PM
My Grandfather flew both Hellcats and Corsairs in WW2 VBF-11. The Cat although with the same engine was much more forgiving in the air. Said it would practiclly land it self. Of course we all know the Corsair as the Ensign Eliminator!!! The prop was so large there was little room for error when landing. His last landing as a matter of fact he stated that a crosswind whipped up and his wing dropped just enough to let the prop strike the ground. He felt horrible because that required that the engine be completly torn down.

BigA21
05-24-2005, 02:54 PM
Flyingbullseye,

1)
I read that it was said amongst the U.S. Navy F6F fliers that they had "...more faith in Grumman than God".
Has he heard of this? and what would he comment about this statement?

2)
Did they have trouble with crazing of the windscreen or keeping them clean? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Please pass along a simple "Thanks" to your friend, for doing what they all did.

VF-3Thunderboy
05-24-2005, 08:29 PM
1. Was the radio Navigation any good, and how did it work?
2. What was the most common combat crusing altitutde?
3. Did he have any enemy encounters?
4. How many planes in an average flight?
5. Any torpedo bomber escorts?


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

BanaBob
05-24-2005, 08:42 PM
Wow, what an honor to be able to interview him, could you ask if he had any idea of the impact their service was going to have on the rest of the world? Please pass on my gratitude and thanks also. We are losing these heros everyday, very sad thing. Glad to hear he is still sharp as a tack too!

~S~

Also, if he had any encounters, what specific type of plane was it/them? If you could find a plane with his markings or know them, i'd like to do an edit for him.

Thanks.

Brass_Monkey
05-24-2005, 09:09 PM
First off I would give him a big Salute and a greatful thanks.

Backdraft57
05-24-2005, 09:35 PM
Please, as mentioned, thank him for my freedom, his service. How about: How much did the sight/cockpit shake when firing weapons?

AerialTarget
05-24-2005, 11:35 PM
Ask him how far he could see behind him, and whether or not he could see the cowling and such.

Asgeir_Strips
05-25-2005, 09:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by flyingbullseye:
Everyone, in the next two weeks, if time allows, I am planning on beginining to interview a friend of mine who flew the F6F-5 in 1944-45 aboard the USS Bennington. I have a number of questions myself however I could use as many as I can. If anyone can help with more think what you would ask if you were doing the interview. He's sharp as a tack so ask away. Thanks for any help.

Flyingbullseye </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're lucky!

First of all, Thank him for contibtuting to an almost free world today, and tell him that I (we, you etc) appreciate his courage by going to war..

Can you ask him these questions if you have the time, and if you find them good/resourceful?

1. Did he practice Carrier landings on the USS Wolverine or Sable? The Only Freshwater carriers in the world.. They operated in the lakes north of chicago i think..

2. Did He experience any enemy action? A/A A/G?
And in that case, what enemy aeroplane did he have the most respect for?

3. If you'd have the chance, would you take a ride in the Hellcat (alone) again? or lets say a P51 Mustang (Two Seater) ?

4. If you've shot down any japanese aircraft, what was the effect of the .50 cal bullet?
And how did you work with your armorer/plane captain to get the deadliest combo of bullets?
like in: Tracer-Incendiary-API etc?

5. Is it true that from what i've heard that Incendiary rounds downed most japanese planes since it had the punch to penetrate japanese light armour and still get their fuel tanks to ingite?

6. How effective was the Us Mk.8 Gunsight in Combat? Did U usually hit what you aimed for?

7. Did U ever receive a wawe off at a carrier approach?

8. How Did you make your final approach? Did you use a curved approach from the left hand side of the carrier so you could spot the LSO as early as possible?

9. When you walked out to your assigned planes on deck, had the plane captains allready started the engines up? or Did you do that yourselves with the aid of the groundcrew?

9b, How did the PW R2800 sound? It started up with a roar didn't it?

10. What was your rank in the Navy/Marines?
Did you ever fly as Flight or Section Leader?

Thanks for your time!

Blutarski2004
05-25-2005, 09:49 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AerialTarget:
Ask him how far he could see behind him, and whether or not he could see the cowling and such. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


..... Corky Meyers (IIRC) mentioned in another Hellcat article that he could see the runway over the nose 100 yards out.

Rear view was poor. Meyers mentioned that he test flew a Hellcat fitted with an experimental bubble canopy, but that it kept blowing out due to air pressure imbalances. Grumman eventually gave up on it.

LEXX_Luthor
05-25-2005, 10:18 AM
Ask him how, as fighter pilot, he Dealt with bad weather, did he avoid flying through big clouds, and how much time he spent looking around for enemy planes -- either on radar guided intercept or escort where he or his flights may not have radar help from the ships.

Thanks.

9th Trespa
05-25-2005, 10:47 AM
ask him if he was ever scared in a df and how he thought of the enemy pilots , was there anything like chivalry or just shoot them if u can , in a chute or not.
I would like to know the mental thing when being in a plane in combat

TgD Thunderbolt56
05-25-2005, 11:20 AM
Ask him if they ever saw any of those big birds that dropped their loads on the windscreens and if the crews were ever able to develope a way to successfully clean it off...and if it was TopSecret... &lt;tongue-in-cheek&gt;


TB

Supr
05-25-2005, 12:55 PM
Tell him my father, who was an island hopping Marine throughout the war, always praised and thanked the Navy pilots.

And yes, we loose those Heroes everyday. My dad passed last Christmas. He spent his last few years volunteering at the D-Day museum in New Orleans. Too bad he didn€t make it to see the new Pacific Theater section. If anyone gets a chance, it a great place to see. If I still lived there, I€d go at least a few times a year, just to keep them all in my memories.

AerialTarget
05-25-2005, 02:21 PM
I'm sure you already thought of this, but I suggest being tasteful in your questions; some of the ones here I would never ask of a veteran.

flyingbullseye
05-26-2005, 01:56 AM
Thanks for the questions guys. From time to time as I am interviewing Sam and working on putting the interview together I will post some things. If you come up with some other questions please post them. Over the past two years as I have gotten to know him I have learned some things about his service, maybe some details can inspire more ideas.

He flew only the F6F-5 in combat though after the war compiled just over 200 hours in the F4U(not sure what model). Trained his landings on the carriers in the Great Lakes before moving onto the real thing. After quite some time on his own he had mentioned he has only one confirmed kill a D3A Val (will give details on that one later) who knows if there was more unknown. Mentioned that despite what Grumman posted about the Hellcats service ceiling he and his squadmates were never able to get it past 28,000ft even at full throttle and full WEP, said it just stopped climbing. Did mention that the ground crew was usually great until the theiving basterds took the clocks out of the cats which was a usual occurence for most pilots, they used the clocks as a nice wall clock, not a big deal until your wrist watch stops working. A fun to fly plane had great stall characteristics, most of the time in a stall the best way to right the plane was to take your hands off the controls and it righted itself, had to be hard to get used to as I would want take control myself.

Will keep everyone updated as time goes on and will post the entire interview after I am done with it and figure out how to post something as large as I believe it to be without taking up too much space.

Flyingbullseye

Asgeir_Strips
05-26-2005, 02:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by flyingbullseye:
Thanks for the questions guys. From time to time as I am interviewing Sam and working on putting the interview together I will post some things. If you come up with some other questions please post them. Over the past two years as I have gotten to know him I have learned some things about his service, maybe some details can inspire more ideas.

He flew only the F6F-5 in combat though after the war compiled just over 200 hours in the F4U(not sure what model). Trained his landings on the carriers in the Great Lakes before moving onto the real thing. After quite some time on his own he had mentioned he has only one confirmed kill a D3A Val (will give details on that one later) who knows if there was more unknown. Mentioned that despite what Grumman posted about the Hellcats service ceiling he and his squadmates were never able to get it past 28,000ft even at full throttle and full WEP, said it just stopped climbing. Did mention that the ground crew was usually great until the theiving basterds took the clocks out of the cats which was a usual occurence for most pilots, they used the clocks as a nice wall clock, not a big deal until your wrist watch stops working. A fun to fly plane had great stall characteristics, most of the time in a stall the best way to right the plane was to take your hands off the controls and it righted itself, had to be hard to get used to as I would want take control myself.

Will keep everyone updated as time goes on and will post the entire interview after I am done with it and figure out how to post something as large as I believe it to be without taking up too much space.

Flyingbullseye </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thank you!

|CoB|_Spectre
05-26-2005, 03:29 PM
I am curious about two things:

1. Assuming the prop and mixture was set for cruise while enroute to and from the boat, what prop setting was using for combat maneuvering? What adjustments to mixture were made as altitude changed with these fast changing maneuvers?

2. In Bud Anderson's recounting of his fight in the verticle with a 109, he mentions how trim adjustments to his Mustang were constantly being made to stablize the aircraft as a gun platform. Did the Hellcat require significant trimming during combat maneuvering?

Asgeir_Strips
05-27-2005, 11:53 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by |CoB|_Spectre:
I am curious about two things:

1. Assuming the prop and mixture was set for cruise while enroute to and from the boat, what prop setting was using for combat maneuvering? What adjustments to mixture were made as altitude changed with these fast changing maneuvers?

2. In Bud Anderson's recounting of his fight in the verticle with a 109, he mentions how trim adjustments to his Mustang were constantly being made to stablize the aircraft as a gun platform. Did the Hellcat require significant trimming during combat maneuvering? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Mixture was set on Auto Rich for takeoff and landing, the prop was set full on i guess. 100% or whatever you call it..

The Prop was always set full on during combat (100% in PF) So that the Airplane can accelerate faster.. Thats what i think anyway.. The Fuel mixture may vary simce it depends on which altitude they/him met japanese planes.. But i guess it was normally set to Auto Rich during combat as well, unless he flew over 16,000 feet or something like that.

AlmightyTallest
05-28-2005, 07:37 PM
Please thank him for my freedom, and his service, my grandfather was on the USS LaGrange and they cheered the Navy pilots that tried to stop the Kamikazi's off of Okinawa for them.

Ask him what his ammo mix was and how effective it was at causing fires on or in Japanese aircraft. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Whoops, I see Asgeir_Strips is asking the same question , I'd really like to know this question though from one from the men who flew the Corsair and Hellcat http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

jb5150
06-07-2005, 11:23 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by Asgeir_Strips:
[QUOTE]Originally posted by flyingbullseye:
1. Did he practice Carrier landings on the USS Wolverine or Sable? The Only Freshwater carriers in the world.. They operated in the lakes north of chicago i think.. [Quote]


My Grandfather had carrier training on the lake in '45.

flyingbullseye
06-07-2005, 02:08 PM
Hi guys sorry I haven't updated this post but I have been busy for some time. I began to interview Sam on friday afternoon and first of all let me say I was overwhelmed! His combat service is somewhat short as he first saw combat on Feburary 16 1945 through June that same year though went into the Navy in late '42. Each question led to 10 more, I think we maybe got through about 1/3 of the details of his service. I was not able to get to all of the questions posted here and other forums as we didn't have the time, probably would still be talked if we did. Couple quick details to post while I continue to interview him and work on what I have. He stated that he wanted to try for the USAAF but since he only had a year of college was rejected as you needed two years to qualify. After basic and flight school he did his practices on the Sable on Lake Michigan in the Chicago area, the other carrier there was the Wolverine. You had to make at least 8 successiful landings to be a carrier pilot. First two missions were over Tokyo, then on to Iwo, Chichi Jima, Ulithi atoll, Okinawa(sp) then back to the states.
Would like to say a few things about flying the F6F-5. Said it was a dream to fly, very stable, great flight characteristics especially stall which was quite gentle, as compared to most other fighers was harder to spin stall than most. Accelerated stalls unless you jumped on the stick was very rare. I know its not a lot of info but from what he described the flight characteristics sounded like it was a good mix of PF and CFS3 FM's. There were some questions regarding how tough the fighter was. It was as tough as talked about, on one mission he has a Zero chasing him on the deck, going full throttle with WEP he left the Zero behind redlining it all the way back to the ship some 20 or so miles away. The engine didn't give out though the in doing so he welded the heads of the engine, was able to take quite a bit of damage from flak as his log books and he describes. He was a recon pilot, was volunteered for it as the four others were shot down, as a matter of fact he shot some of the photos shown on the 'net as the Yamoto was getting pounded. To lighten the fighter he took 4 of the machine guns out, though two was enough to shoot down a D3A Val.
Hope some things are not too scattered as I said I was over whelmed hearing all the info, reading his log books, and going through some of the photos released that he took. One question led to so many more its hard to really know not only where to continue but what to really post so as not to take up too much space. What was interesting when I called him to interview he mentioned his service was nothing special, but as we talked I could see he just enjoyed going down memory lane, when he was younger. He will not be forgotten and I think he is begiining to know that, he and many others may not think that their service is special but for us that come behind them we are the reciepents of that sacrifice, lets not forget them or take what we have for granted.

AerialTarget
06-07-2005, 02:52 PM
Can you arrange for him to play the game?

SOLO_Bones
06-08-2005, 04:31 AM
Ask him at what distance would the blue icon show up. Did he fly with unlimited ammo and fly with the trigger pressed at all times? And did he fly with HUD view mostly for better visuals?

OF course I'm being facetious, but seriously it would be interesting to know how many kills he recorded through his entire navy career.

steppie2005
06-10-2005, 12:32 AM
there is a great book on the F6F called The Hellcat The F6F in would war II by Barrett Tillman. It gives you an under standing why pilots liked to flie it and some great stores from pilots such as Commander David McCampbell 34 Kills and Lieutenant Eugene A Valencia 23 Kills
Rolls F6F-5 is equal to a Zeke 52 under 200 Knots
speed
5000 feet F6F-5 50 knot faster Zeke 52
15000 feet F6F-5 70 Knots faster Zeke 52
25000 feet F6F-5 85 Knots faster Zeke