PDA

View Full Version : Supersonic, and space



thedude9555
08-01-2008, 07:31 PM
I saw the pic in the picture gallery, i think the pici s at the bottom on page 14, andi wanted to get that high also.

So i took a 163, and to my amzedment, i made it up to 100,000m before i dove down, and i made it to 1430 mph(i switched the speed indicator thingy to mph) so i broke supersonic.

Ima go look at the track if i can see/find a sonic boom.

Anybody else ever done this?

Secret ot getting high: start at 100m and just keep going up.

Zeus-cat
08-01-2008, 07:56 PM
I seriously doubt that sonic booms or other supersonic effects are modelled in the game. None of these planes were meant to go supersonic in real life during the time period the game represents so why would Oleg build it into the game?

VW-IceFire
08-01-2008, 08:31 PM
Game engine was definitely never programmed for supersonic flight so in game terms you were just going numerically faster rather than entering a different realm of flight.

Also what is supersonic at the altitude you achieved it at? As I understand, the mach number is different at different altitudes but I don't know how it scales or in which direction.

thedude9555
08-01-2008, 09:29 PM
i think i hit supersonic at like about 4-5k meters.

It wold be cool if sonic boom was modelled in the game, but its not.

gdfo
08-02-2008, 04:47 AM
The 'sonic boom' is felt and heard on the ground as the pressure wave reaches it.

Do any of you know for sure that a pilot flying the plane hears and feels the exact same thing?

If he did it would be constant because he is creating the pressure wave.

Aircraft and pilot did experience transonic buffeting but as I understand it, aircraft now do not due to improved designs.

To a pilot during the era of the game he would experience the transonic buffeting but not hear a sonic boom.

The 1946 game planes are not equiped with mach meters and the speed of sound changes with altitude and humidity conditions, that would be a very big challenge to any flight sim creator.

Jambock_Dolfo
08-02-2008, 04:55 AM
Originally posted by gdfo:

...
Do any of you know for sure that a pilot flying the plane hears and feels the exact same thing?
...

...and the speed of sound changes with altitude and humidity conditions,...

Feels nothing, hears nothing.

And the speed of sound (in the air) changes with temperature only.


-dolfo

gdfo
08-02-2008, 02:54 PM
The Mach number is commonly used both with objects traveling at high speed in a fluid, and with high-speed fluid flows inside channels such as nozzles, diffusers or wind tunnels. As it is defined as a ratio of two speeds, it is a dimensionless number. At a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius and at sea level, the speed of sound is 340.3 m/s[2] (1225 km/h, or 761.2 mph, or 1116 ft/s) in the Earth's atmosphere. The speed represented by Mach 1 is not a constant; for example, it is dependent on temperature and atmospheric composition. In the stratosphere it remains constant irrespective of altitude even though the air pressure varies with altitude.The Mach number is commonly used both with objects traveling at high speed in a fluid, and with high-speed fluid flows inside channels such as nozzles, diffusers or wind tunnels. As it is defined as a ratio of two speeds, it is a dimensionless number. At a temperature of 15 degrees Celsius and at sea level, the speed of sound is 340.3 m/s[2] (1225 km/h, or 761.2 mph, or 1116 ft/s) in the Earth's atmosphere. The speed represented by Mach 1 is not a constant; for example, it is dependent on temperature and atmospheric composition. In the stratosphere it remains constant irrespective of altitude even though the air pressure varies with altitude.

Since the speed of sound increases as the temperature increases, the actual speed of an object traveling at Mach 1 will depend on the fluid temperature around it. Mach number is useful because the fluid behaves in a similar way at the same Mach number. So, an aircraft traveling at Mach 1 at sea level (340.3 m/s, 761.2 mph, 1,225 km/h) will experience shock waves in much the same manner as when it is traveling at Mach 1 at 11,000 m (36,000 ft), even though it is traveling at 295 m/s (654.6 mph, 1,062 km/h, 86% of its speed at sea level).


from... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mach_number

K_Freddie
08-02-2008, 04:36 PM
AFAIK, you only get visual evidence (if you're awake), and a minor control disturbance.

jdigris001
08-02-2008, 07:04 PM
Originally posted by Jambock_Dolfo:


Feels nothing, hears nothing.


Not true. With some early aircraft it was common to get a shake in the controls, even control reversal. As for noise, nope, you dont hear anything

Ive been supersonic in a F/A-18, below cliff height down Katherine Gorge in the NT Australia and at 300 ft over Tindal Airbase in the NT Australia and going through the barrier there was no buffeting or noise in the cockpit, just a lot of condensation on the LEXs and leading edge of the wingtip sidewinder rails. Other than whats on the instrumentation, you wouldnt know if you were supersonic or not in a Hornet.

As for supersonic in the game, quite a few of the fighters can do it, even the prop ones (which we know is not possible in real life) Heres how to do it, climb to 10000 metres, go into a full throttle vertical dive and slowly start leveling out at 4000m, eventually level out at 500 feet and you should be over 1300 kmh. Its very easy in the Dornier, ME262, Mustang, even the Spit can be coaxed. Incidently when I did it in a Corsair the wings ripped off, and once in the 262 the tail broke off, did they deliberately code this? AAnd in the game, there is no sonic boom

http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/8990/supersonicag8.th.jpg (http://img517.imageshack.us/my.php?image=supersonicag8.jpg)