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smurfo2007
04-01-2007, 03:32 AM
Hi All, I'm a noob at this game (I admit it). I also normally fly off-line and only get to fly a couple of hours a week (if I'm lucky).

I normally fly the "wonder woman" view, mainly so I can orient with the ground and icons show where the bad guy has gone. Also I don't have Track IR.

If you fly cockpit on, no icons how do you orient so that you know bank angle etc? Do you take cues from seeing the cockpit frame, bits of your plane and what the view of the ground looks like?

I know if I was flying for real I would get an idea from both peripheral vision and my own balance.

Thanks for any guidance you can give,

smurfo2007
04-01-2007, 03:32 AM
Hi All, I'm a noob at this game (I admit it). I also normally fly off-line and only get to fly a couple of hours a week (if I'm lucky).

I normally fly the "wonder woman" view, mainly so I can orient with the ground and icons show where the bad guy has gone. Also I don't have Track IR.

If you fly cockpit on, no icons how do you orient so that you know bank angle etc? Do you take cues from seeing the cockpit frame, bits of your plane and what the view of the ground looks like?

I know if I was flying for real I would get an idea from both peripheral vision and my own balance.

Thanks for any guidance you can give,

Skycat_2
04-01-2007, 04:15 AM
I still get disoriented fairly often, but I've gotten much better with reading the instrument panel. I supplement that with information from the speedbar because its easier to know speed, altitude and heading at a glance than to try to decipher the guages.

That said, a lot will depend on the nationality you fly for and the model of the plane you are using. Most American and German planes have an artificial horizon indicator that is similar to the one provided in 'wonder woman' view. Most other planes have some kind of guage where if the needle is centered (at zero, usually, and typically parallel to the floor) the plane is flying level, and if the needle moves above or below centered that indicates how many degrees up or down the nose is pitched.

Most planes have a compass and a needle that shows the aircraft's heading. American planes normally have a magnetic compass that is easy to read if you that 0 is North, 90 is East, 180 is South, and 270 is West. Many Russian and German planes have this type of compass also. German aircraft may also have a dial that has N, O (Ost means East), S and W, and a needle inside moves to show the plane's heading.

Some instrument panels have a turn and bank indicator, often a needle that points straight up when the aircraft is flying level.

Get to know the instrument layout of the planes you fly most, and to understand what the guages are telling you.

And yes, watching your wing's relationship to the horizon and other visual cues is important also.

Moosehog1
04-01-2007, 07:02 AM
I too fly off line alot. I would buy a Track ir as soon as you can it will be a new game and a lot more fun. If you can rudder peddles would be next but a track ir is a must.PS it has like a three hr to get used to it but you will never fly with out it again. I have to use it even when i was doing tweeks to the new computter.

Michael

dbillo
04-01-2007, 11:30 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by smurfo2007:
I know if I was flying for real I would get an idea from both peripheral vision and my own balance. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Well, I think you are mistaken about pilots using "balance" to keep oriented. In fact the opposite is true...when pilots lose their view of the ground and sky, they typically get disoriented and crash, or they rely on their instruments to maintain orientation.
Personally, I get disoriented by "Wonder Woman View" because I don't have the reference of the cockpit and airplane around me to relate to the ground and sky, but I do understand how some people use it compensate for the lack of peripheral vision and ability to look around intuitively in the game.
Personally, I like the simulation of "flying in an airplane" that the game offers, so I have always flown with cockpit on, and learned to make the most of the clues that are available to maintain orientation, both the things you mentioned, and the instruments, which do work correctly just as in real aircraft.

Lurch1962
04-02-2007, 05:04 PM
Smurfo,
To keep oriented in a fight I use other views quite a lot, such as looking across the wings, over the shoulder, and 45 and 90 degrees forward/up. (It helps immensely to have at least some views mapped to hat switches!) With the cockpit ON it's actually easier to know where you're looking and how your plane's oriented with respect to the ground (if the ground's visible, that is http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif)

Do you tend to keep your view "locked" in the forward direction, relying on the direction arrows to point the way toward the bad guys? If so, when you go into either a steep climb or steep dive you can easily lose track of the directions toward the zenith and nadir (the points exactly 90 degrees up and down with respect to the plane of the horizon). Such disorientation can lead to a stall and/or crash.

--Lurch--