PDA

View Full Version : Ot-Opinion needed on Osprey Aviation Elite Units books...



stef51
09-11-2006, 10:23 AM
http://www.ospreypublishing.com/title_detail.php/title=T0455~ser=AEU (http://www.ospreypublishing.com/title_detail.php/title=T0455%7Eser=AEU)


Hi, I'd like to know about this book that I'd like to get but would like to know if the author is good enough to find new materials that would make this worth it. Of course, there are very few infos on JG 51 so anything new is better than nothing but for those who have bought similar books from that series, are you happy with it?

Thanks

Stephen

leitmotiv
09-11-2006, 10:33 AM
Weal wrote the best book on the Ju 88 bombers in English as part of this series. He has a large collection of German language books on the Luftwaffe and they form the basis of the text. The photos in the Ju 88 volume were excellent. The drawings, both general arrangement and color side-views were horrible. I have many aviation Ospreys. The very best I've seen was their bomber unit volume on the G4M "Betty." At their worst, they are passable introductions. They are basically for people who do not want to shell out the 30-100 dollars for the best books on the subjects. I am not familiar with this one. Weal probably did well on the text.

LEBillfish
09-11-2006, 10:37 AM
I cannot say not having that book............Yet can say the following.

ALL books will be generic, meaning they cannot explain everything in absolute detail or a single topic becomes and encyclopedia. YET, most have a few little invaluable facts, those few tidbits often worth the bulk.

In kind, NEVER rely on one source to be fact. EVERY book or document I have read has some bit of bias to it. Be it intentional or over compensation, or ignorance when someone puts something into their own words their opinion will be reflected in it..............SO......Take everything with a grain of salt and get for yourself multiple sources.

The answer clear, if the subject of that book interests you, get it, then get others on it.

bhunter2112
09-11-2006, 01:13 PM
I own about 40 Osprey books and I recommend them highly. They are made well and the content is top notch (I have found a few typoe's on a couple). The book you mention is not out yet and I myself have it on order. The author Weal has done many titles. The books are a blend of text, pictures, maps, and aircraft profile drawings. very nice.

stef51
09-11-2006, 03:01 PM
All right, I'll get it.Many thanks for replying... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif



Originally posted by LEBillfish:

In kind, NEVER rely on one source to be fact. EVERY book or document I have read has some bit of bias to it. Be it intentional or over compensation, or ignorance when someone puts something into their own words their opinion will be reflected in it.



You know, I've started to get that feeling sometimes. Small contradictions or one book will somewhat exagerate a situation.. things like that. And it's just because I bought many books on the same subject like you said. Yet, it is somewhat sad that you need now to 'decide' what is true or biased..... Many arguments in the forums are based on books and there is always someone who will come with new infos to invalidate something everyone thought was true...

Stephen

leitmotiv
09-11-2006, 04:57 PM
As in George Orwell's ANIMAL FARM's Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others so it goes with books. Quantity never has a quality of its own in books or articles. Ospreys are usually a fast-food variety of info---the authors usually, but not always, are not experts in their fields (the Norman Franks volumes on WWI aircraft are a notable exception). The best thing to do is to go to a good bookstore and try to look at the book before buying. Check the bibliography---did the author do any archival research or does he only list secondary sources (that is, other published books)? The more archival work the better. Authors who rely entirely on published sources are generally run of the mill and produce run of the mill books. Some authors have special qualifications, look at the biographical info on the author on the dust jacket. Robert Mikesh, for example, was an Air Force pilot, became a specialist on Japanese WWII aircraft, and later rose to high positions in the National Air and Space Museum. A good example of a magnificently researched aviation book is MAGNESIUM OVERCAST by Jenkins on the B-36. Some publishers, such as Schiffer, have an excellent reputation for publishing well-researched books (I am referring to their hard-bound books, their paperbacks are sometimes not very good). Some series one should avoid like the plague---Squadron's IN ACTION series being a case in point, except for very rare cases such as the superb Buffalo publication, they are thrown together by non-experts from unattributed sources. I have friends who have spent thousands of dollars on junk. Better to choose carefully and spend wisely. An inexpensive volume like the Osprey G4M can be a gem sometimes.

luftluuver
09-11-2006, 05:20 PM
leitmotiv, do you know what paragraphs are? Kindly use them as line after line of text is very hard to read.

Denes Bernad (S/S Hs129) will be glad to know he is not an expert. So will Hans-Heiri Stapfer.

SkyChimp
09-11-2006, 05:37 PM
All of the Osprey books are pretty good. I call them bathroom books. I've read all mine in the bathroom. They are good for that.

p1ngu666
09-11-2006, 05:39 PM
so are good, some arent. if your buying at full price then flick through a copy, if u can get it dirt cheap then dont worry to much

leitmotiv
09-11-2006, 10:29 PM
If you can't digest that puny, ridiculous paragraph, luftluvver, which, as in all well-crafted paragraphs is a complete idea, I fancy you can't manage to read books, and that explains a great deal about your thinking.

xTHRUDx
09-11-2006, 11:03 PM
download the whole series in PDF format. there are many books to download out there.

Feathered_IV
09-11-2006, 11:10 PM
John Weal is an OK author, if a little dry. Ospreys are pretty affordable though. So you can't go wrong http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

whiteladder
09-12-2006, 01:52 AM
All of the Osprey books are pretty good. I call them bathroom books. I've read all mine in the bathroom


I have "Company infantry tactics", "FW190 Aces of the Western Front" and "Knights Templar" in the bathroom at the moment! All Osprey books.

Only place I get any peace these days http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

luftluuver
09-12-2006, 03:32 AM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
If you can't digest that puny, ridiculous paragraph, luftluvver, which, as in all well-crafted paragraphs is a complete idea, I fancy you can't manage to read books, and that explains a great deal about your thinking. Dah, it is well known that continuous lines of text, as you post, are hard to read on a monitor.

stef51
09-12-2006, 10:37 AM
Well, never thought I'd get that much infos, I really appreciate it. 2 more questions I'm trying to find answers.

Why there are practically no books on JG 51 and if there is a big book available somewhere. It seems like there are some books in the German language about JG 51 but not in English or French. Obviously the little Osprey book I want is 128 pages long, and I'd like to have something like 500 pages... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

I've got a big one for JG 26 for example. Why not one on JG 51? All records lost and no pilot alive to write one? I've got some book on Moelders that helps but of course it stops in 1941...

Stephen

mandrill7
09-12-2006, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
If you can't digest that puny, ridiculous paragraph, luftluvver, which, as in all well-crafted paragraphs is a complete idea, I fancy you can't manage to read books, and that explains a great deal about your thinking.

It's not "as in all well-crafted paragraphs"; it's "as WITH all well-crafted paragraphs". Aside from that, your writing is exquisite, in the finest - and most incomprehensibly convoluted - tradition of Henry James.