PDA

View Full Version : Need expert advice to settle beer bet:Spifire Prop blade construction???



jamesdietz
04-09-2006, 01:15 PM
I have a friendly bet over the material of Spitfire prop blades were made...not the early Spit1 two bladed wooden props ,but the later 3 blade constant speed props AND the 5 bladed Griffon powered later Spitfires.I know there's at least one expert who can quote chapter & verse..can you give me a hand? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

horseback
04-09-2006, 02:19 PM
Man, James, the sun's barely over the yardarm here, and you're already working on a beer buzz?

S!

AFAIK, the first variable pitch three-bladed props were the de Havilland types and these were metal, found on Mk I, Mk II, and some early Mk V Spits. You can recognize these by their blunter spinners and more slender profile-sort of a skinny root, widening out and then a rounded tip. Some seen during the Battle of Britain are carrying an oversized round spinner intended for the Hurricane, but just as effective on the Spit. This was a wartime expedient, not seen much after September of 1940.

These largely (but not entirely) gave way to the Rotol wooden Jablo props seen on most Mk Vs and early Seafires. These had an appearance similar to a 'cuffed' blade, wide at the base, with a sharper looking tip, and sported a longer and pointy-er spinner than the de Havilland spinners.

As we move into the 4-bladed props, the profile of the blades changes again, and in most cases during the war, the Jablo wood type props are the norm, although there were some props of aluminum or hollow steel used; a prop strike with wooden props gave the engine a better chance of surviving because they would shatter, while the stress caused by metal props bending could be fatal. Metal props were lighter and more easily manufactured to proper balance, but wooden props were not made of 'strategic' materials and were more forgiving in a nose-over.

This trend continued with the first Gryffon engined 5-bladed props during the war. After the war ended, and metals and engines became comparatively less precious, I understand that most operational Spits eventually got metal props.

cheers

horseback

Taylortony
04-09-2006, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by jamesdietz:
I have a friendly bet over the material of Spitfire prop blades were made...not the early Spit1 two bladed wooden props ,but the later 3 blade constant speed props AND the 5 bladed Griffon powered later Spitfires.I know there's at least one expert who can quote chapter & verse..can you give me a hand? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif


James, Flypast has a special mag out to celebrate 70 yrs of the Spit........

slipBall
04-09-2006, 03:26 PM
OOOOH beeeer, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif hope you win http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif



http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/images.jpg

Taylortony
04-09-2006, 03:34 PM
Want one James??

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DOWTY-ROTOL-WW2-WOODEN-PROPELLOR-...QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem (http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/DOWTY-ROTOL-WW2-WOODEN-PROPELLOR-BLADE-MERLIN-HURRICANE_W0QQitemZ9506199238QQcategoryZ2983QQrdZ1 QQcmdZViewItem)

major_setback
04-09-2006, 03:58 PM
Wood doesn't bend:

http://www.clubhyper.com/reference/images/01-DLH1.jpg

luftluuver
04-09-2006, 04:34 PM
Originally posted by major_setback:
Wood doesn't bend

Missed this did you?

AFAIK, the first variable pitch three-bladed props were the de Havilland types and these were metal, found on Mk I, Mk II, and <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">some early Mk V Spits</span>.

These largely <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">(but not entirely)</span> gave way to the Rotol wooden Jablo props seen on most Mk Vs and early Seafires.

IL2-chuter
04-09-2006, 07:43 PM
From a pilot's standpoint I prefer (well balanced) wood props over metal because they are much smoother, absorbing engine vibration quite nicely. Maintainance is, sadly, nonstop and there can be an engine accelleration hit as well. On small aircraft, however, metal blades are usually much more efficient because they can be made much thinner.

major_setback
04-09-2006, 08:24 PM
Originally posted by luftluuver:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by major_setback:
Wood doesn't bend

Missed this did you?

AFAIK, the first variable pitch three-bladed props were the de Havilland types and these were metal, found on Mk I, Mk II, and <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">some early Mk V Spits</span>.

These largely <span class="ev_code_YELLOW">(but not entirely)</span> gave way to the Rotol wooden Jablo props seen on most Mk Vs and early Seafires. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

All Spitfire props are metal..except for the ones that aren't. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WTE_Galway
04-09-2006, 09:35 PM
pretty sure the flyable mkVIII at Temora Aviation Museum has a 3 blade wooden prop.

I450IVex
04-10-2006, 02:36 AM
that crashed 54 squadron plane is a MK VIII

i had a crack at skinning it.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v600/Nezbit/Pacific%20Fighters/Allied/il2fb2006-01-1619-47-58-17.jpg

WOLFMondo
04-10-2006, 02:55 AM
Thats a V, not a VIII :P

major_setback
04-10-2006, 06:03 AM
Originally posted by I450IVex:
that crashed 54 squadron plane is a MK VIII

i had a crack at skinning it.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v600/Nezbit/Pacific%20Fighters/Allied/il2fb2006-01-1619-47-58-17.jpg

That's an excellent skin. Where can I find it?
The cannon colour looks a bit odd though, do you know why...is it a skin for a mk V or mk VIII?

horseback
04-10-2006, 08:26 AM
That's a Vc with 2x20mm based in the Southwest Pacific. Allied a/c had white leading edges on the wings and in some cases, white tails for recognition purposes in that theater. The cannon barrels were not painted white in this instance, altho some examples may have been.

cheers

horseback

Chuck_Older
04-10-2006, 10:04 AM
Wood surely does bend. Go look at a tree the next time the wind picks up http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif If wood didn't bend, the American Indians would have used something else for bows

I450IVex
04-11-2006, 01:38 AM
hehee my mistake, brain fart

54 squadron image is a mkVc
thats what i meant.
another plane from that squadron, DL-H crashed into the ocean, they towed it out.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v600/Nezbit/Pacific%20Fighters/Allied/02-DLL1.jpg

i never uploaed mate, i rarely do.

i can email it you if you wish

jamesdietz
04-11-2006, 10:24 AM
We both win! Beer on me for the house! Many thanks all!

luftluuver
04-11-2006, 10:53 AM
Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
Wood surely does bend. Go look at a tree the next time the wind picks up http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif If wood didn't bend, the American Indians would have used something else for bows Not a hard wood bent 90 degrees, unless well steamed. The American indians did not make the bend in their bows in one step.

I450IVex
04-11-2006, 02:37 PM
thats it, wood is full of fluid on a tree.
its dead once its removed, dries out and becomes brittle.

steaming wood for bending is a process.