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MAILMAN------
10-11-2006, 06:00 PM
Why is it that not all altimeter gages work correctly at 30,000 feet and above? Yes I have read that altitude is not supposed to be modeled above 30,000 feet, but that does not explain why some aircraft have gages that continue to work that high and other aircraft have gages that don't, they just lock at 30,000 feet. Is this a known problem and has it been reported to PF@1C.ru?

Has it gone the way of the incorrect fuel indication in the F4U-1D and Corsair IV not indication a full fuel tank even with drop tanks & also gone the way of USN/USMC speed inicator gages being in MPH instead of the correct KIAS (the Hurricane IIb uses KIAS)? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

So far I have found that the following aircraft altimeter gages stop increasing at 30,000 feet (although the speed bar if enabled continues up):
F4F, F4U, F6F,P-40 & P-47

Yet the P-51 and P-38 altimeter gage continues to work beyond 30,000 feet.

I have not tested others yet?

MAILMAN------
10-11-2006, 06:00 PM
Why is it that not all altimeter gages work correctly at 30,000 feet and above? Yes I have read that altitude is not supposed to be modeled above 30,000 feet, but that does not explain why some aircraft have gages that continue to work that high and other aircraft have gages that don't, they just lock at 30,000 feet. Is this a known problem and has it been reported to PF@1C.ru?

Has it gone the way of the incorrect fuel indication in the F4U-1D and Corsair IV not indication a full fuel tank even with drop tanks & also gone the way of USN/USMC speed inicator gages being in MPH instead of the correct KIAS (the Hurricane IIb uses KIAS)? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

So far I have found that the following aircraft altimeter gages stop increasing at 30,000 feet (although the speed bar if enabled continues up):
F4F, F4U, F6F,P-40 & P-47

Yet the P-51 and P-38 altimeter gage continues to work beyond 30,000 feet.

I have not tested others yet?

Taylortony
10-11-2006, 06:22 PM
An altimeter is basically a sealed barometric capsule that has air in it, as you ascend the outside air pressure drops and the capsule expands, this in turn via a linkage moves the pointers, the higher you go the more inaccurate it becomes etc... when it reaches its limit of travel it cannot go further

some modern ones come with a rated altitude of say 20,000 feet after that is loses the plot so to speak, these are chosen for the given altitude range the aiircraft will operate at, now if your plane is a mud mover and not intended to fly at high altitudes it will have a lower rated altimeter which is accurate at lower alts..