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TonyPiech
11-24-2004, 08:29 PM
Sometimes I get an engine oveheat warning, necessitating a throttle-back and loosing power and speed. What gauge(s) are especially critical to monitor to keep this from happening?
And at what reading (level)should I keep below to stop receiving such a warning. Does opening your radiator reduce engine overheat? I realize it may cause some drag and loss of speed but it may become necessary to use. Basically what guages should I monitor and what steps can I take other than the obvious throttling-back?

Fliger747
11-25-2004, 03:29 PM
Real vrs the game can have a divergence. That said, for aircooled radials, management of the cowlflaps is the main tool. Reduction of RPM (only in non combat) helps a lot as well.

The primary indication in radials is the cyl. head temp guage. 260 C would 'burnout' a R2800 in cyl #13. however the guage probes were not attached to this cylinder!

Open the cowl flaps, reduce throttle and RPM, in that order.

Mjollnir111675
11-25-2004, 03:41 PM
Dont fergit that mixture and prop pitch SHOULD have an effect as well................


EDIT:....and magneto's and supahchahja!!

Fennec_P
11-25-2004, 04:14 PM
Keep in mind that most planes can have the overheat warning for 3 minutes or more with no ill effects. Sometimes as long as 10 minutes with some planes, under certain conditions.

So don't worry too much when you see it, so long as you intend to cool off after a reasonable amount of time. If you try to avoid the message too much, you won't be using your engine to the full, especially in combat.

For example, using 110% + MW50 in the Bf-109 will give an overheat warning right away. But you can use it for about 3-4 minutes before your motor breaks down.

As well, shock cooling doesn't seem to have any effect. Throttling to idle will cure your heat problem right away.

Mjollnir111675
11-25-2004, 04:19 PM
Quick way I like to cool off is this:

Chop throttlage,open flappulation and engagen in das divulation!!! COOL MAN!!! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jason Bourne
11-25-2004, 05:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Fennec_P:
Keep in mind that most planes can have the overheat warning for 3 minutes or more with no ill effects. Sometimes as long as 10 minutes with some planes, under certain conditions.

So don't worry too much when you see it, so long as you intend to cool off after a reasonable amount of time. If you try to avoid the message too much, you won't be using your engine to the full, especially in combat.

For example, using 110% + MW50 in the Bf-109 will give an overheat warning right away. But you can use it for about 3-4 minutes before your motor breaks down.

As well, shock cooling doesn't seem to have any effect. Throttling to idle will cure your heat problem right away. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

pshh, aparently you have never taken a 109 off auto prop pitch and onto 100%, in less then 15 seconds, your engine will sieze up

Fliger747
11-25-2004, 10:51 PM
Prop pitch is RPM. These are constant speed props in these planes, not controllable pitch props. Pitch is mis-labled in the game and causes a lot of confusion as to what it does.

Reducing the 'value' of prop pitch in the game loads the prop up and reduces the RPM of the engine. The prop, say in the R2800 is geared down, to keep tip velocities sub sonic. The ratio varied with model. This initially started out with a troublesome 1:2 ratio (vibration). Other ratios varied with the type of aircraft and engine model.

So When the prop is set to a "value" in the game, you are setting the prop to maintain a prop speed, which sets an engine speed, which can be read on the tachometer in the cockpit.

Mixture has some effect, however this is not modeled accuratly in the game either. The R2800 had Full rich (fuel did help cooling, but caused power loss {since you were heat limited, ya could up the MP a bit more to compensate}), Auto rich (for climb and combat) auto lean (for cruise) and idle cutoff (no gaz).

Generally a richer mixture will run 'cooler'. Downsides, power loss and reduced fuel economy (range).