PDA

View Full Version : Turning around on carriers?



F4U_Flyer
11-02-2004, 11:41 PM
I havent been able to turn around on the deck of a carrier.Individual wheel brakes or a tailwheel that relly locks turned instead of straight might make this possible. The reason for the question on turning around on carriers is so you can get into a takeoff position , especially in mp. i've noticed you can set and unset wheel chocks and your plane will back up but with 2 or 3 planes on the deck how will you be able to takeoff after landing if you cant turn around? Maybe this could be addressed in the upcoming patch. Where do i post this question so developers can see it? Thanks

Baron_99th
11-03-2004, 12:41 AM
Hi,

I've been able to successfully turn around on a carrier using a Seafire.

The method I use is as follows:
1) On landing, I taxi the aircraft forward of the carrier's Island, just above the lift area marked on the deck and position the aircraft on the left-hand-side of the front of the deck, in order to give me enough turing room.

2) I then apply, and more importantly, hold full right rudder.

3) I then apply, and again, hold down the brakes.

4) While still holding down the brakes and applying full right rudder, I then gently apply power. The more power applied, the faster the rate of turn. I do this until the aircraft is facing in the opposite direction.

5) Once the aircraft has turned around and is facing the stern of the carrier, I reduce the power to idle and release the brakes and rudder.

6) I then taxi the aircraft to the bow of the carrier and carefully position the aircraft to the left again to give me enough turning room.

7) I then repeat steps 2-4 until the aircraft is pointing towards the front and then apply the wheel chocks.

I've been able to do this repeatedly. I have made a recording, but I'm unsure of how to upload the track.

Anyway, hope this helps.

Cheers,

Derek.

ELEM
11-03-2004, 01:35 AM
Yep, no problem here too. Just use the differential brakes, rudder and throttle as you would in R/L. Swings around on a sixpence (or dime)!

ARSNL
11-03-2004, 01:40 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by F4U_Flyer:
The reason for the question on turning around on carriers is so you can get into a takeoff position , especially in mp. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

You don't turn around and takeoff again online. You select Refly and your plane will rearm/refuel and respawn. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

rodion_zero
11-03-2004, 01:58 AM
You guys sure that differential braking is in the sim? Only found one brake key/button.

-RODION

oFZo
11-03-2004, 01:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rodion_zero:
You guys sure that differential braking is in the sim? Only found one brake key/button.

-RODION <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
If you use full rudder + brake to one side only that wheel brakes.

rodion_zero
11-03-2004, 02:04 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by oFZo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rodion_zero:
You guys sure that differential braking is in the sim? Only found one brake key/button.

-RODION <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
If you use full rudder + brake to one side only that wheel brakes. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

LOL but that is NOT differential braking. Real differential braking is done using the TWO TOE BRAKES on the rudder pedals. Now if the sim just modelled that, all one had to do was lock(brake) one wheel and apply throttle--NO need to mess with the rudder.

-RODION

ELEM
11-03-2004, 02:24 AM
This has been discussed many times on this forum. You are talking from an American a/c perspective. There are 2 systems of differential braking, the American is as you describe. The European (and Russian) is different in that you use full rudder in combination with a brake lever. This article on the An-2 describes it quite well...

http://www.utility-aircraft.com/planes/an2_01.htm

Both are Differential braking, because there is a differential of pressure between the L/H and R/H brake. This sim uses the European/Russian system, not surprisingly! and even though it is not strictly correct for the American a/c in this sim, I don't think Oleg feels the work required to change it is worthwhile or neccesary. It works perfectly well as it is.

rodion_zero
11-03-2004, 02:27 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ELEM:
This has been discussed many times on this forum. You are talking from an American a/c perspective. There are 2 systems of differential braking, the American is as you describe. The European (and Russian) is different in that you use full rudder in combination with a brake lever. This article on the An-2 describes it quite well...

http://www.utility-aircraft.com/planes/an2_01.htm

Both are Differential braking, because there is a differential of pressure between the L/H and R/H brake. This sim uses the European/Russian system, not surprisingly! and even though it is not strictly correct for the American a/c in this sim, I don't think Oleg feels the work required to change it is worthwhile or neccesary. It works perfectly well as it is. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks for clearing this up--I learned something new today http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

-RODION

AWL_Spinner
11-03-2004, 03:49 AM
Most aircraft (that I've tried, anyway) seem to slowly pivot round without any issue at full brake and 20% power, full rudder deflection.

It can be slow but it's on the spot. Also try folding the wings, someone reported ground handling behaviour is a bit different in "parked" configuration.

Cheers, Spinner

PF_Coastie
11-03-2004, 04:13 AM
As far as I know you can not turn past 90 degrees on a Moving carrier. On a static carrier, no problem.

AWL_Spinner
11-03-2004, 04:27 AM
Can definitely spin a Seafire round on the moving carrier training mission. Full brake and 20% throttle seems to work nicely.

I don't know what speed that carrier's moving, of course.

Cheers, Spinner.

oFZo
11-03-2004, 07:00 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rodion_zero:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ELEM:
This has been discussed many times on this forum. You are talking from an American a/c perspective. There are 2 systems of differential braking, the American is as you describe. The European (and Russian) is different in that you use full rudder in combination with a brake lever. This article on the An-2 describes it quite well...

http://www.utility-aircraft.com/planes/an2_01.htm

Both are Differential braking, because there is a differential of pressure between the L/H and R/H brake. This sim uses the European/Russian system, not surprisingly! and even though it is not strictly correct for the American a/c in this sim, I don't think Oleg feels the work required to change it is worthwhile or neccesary. It works perfectly well as it is. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks for clearing this up--I learned something new today http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

-RODION <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

rodion_zero
11-03-2004, 09:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PF_Coastie:
As far as I know you can not turn past 90 degrees on a Moving carrier. On a static carrier, no problem. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes that was also a complaint of mine, until I realized that the sim engine was indeed acting in a realistic manner--the reason why it has a hard time turning beyong 90 degrees is because the horizontal stabilizer (tail) of the aircraft is making the nose point to the wind, and thus if you attempt to move the a/c sideways, it will start drifting back to point at the bow...this also happens in X-Plane.

-RODION

ELEM
11-03-2004, 10:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by rodion_zero:
-the reason why it has a hard time turning beyong 90 degrees is because the horizontal stabilizer (tail) of the aircraft is making the nose point to the wind,
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think you'll find it's the Vertical stabilizer that is causing this. It's called "weathervaning".

Philipscdrw
11-03-2004, 12:11 PM
You can reverse down the carrier by repeatedly applying and releasing the wheel chocks.

F4U_Flyer
11-04-2004, 10:05 PM
ok , did some more testing and on a moving carrier you cannot turn around. Apparently the wind as stated in one of the posts prevents turning. The only fix i see possible would be to map brakes to individual wheels , if thats possible. I guess backing up with the wheel chocks isnt that bad , is it!?

IV_JG51_Razor
11-05-2004, 01:40 AM
In real life, once you trapped, you taxied forward out of the gear, and on up forward to be parked and shut down for servicing. If you needed maintenance, they might put you on the elevator for a ride down to the hanger deck. After flight quarters were secured, the aircraft were pushed back to the aft end of the deck and spotted for the next launch, where they continued servicing the rest of the planes. There wasn't any need to do much taxiing around on those carrier decks.

I think the best we can hope for out of this sim is a good screen shot of your squaddies and you parked up at the forward end of the flight deck (wings folded of course) before heading down to the ready room to brief for the next launch. They will all be spotted aft when you come back up on the flight deck http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Phil_C
11-05-2004, 02:56 PM
Um guys, i hate to tell ya but you CAN turn the plane around on the carrier.

i have a track saved on how i did it, but the ending is embarrassing lol.

it wasnt too hard, just fold the wings and use the carrier's island as a wind break