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woofiedog
01-24-2006, 01:20 AM
Came across this article about a Fw-189 restoration looking up some info...

The FW 189 usually carried a crew of three although it was capable of carrying up to five.

http://users.belgacom.net/airimg1/avion1/19272.jpe
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW"> Compared to contemporary aircraft, the Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu (Owl) looked a little odd. Only after very successful flights tests and trials was the Fw 189 reluctantly ordered in small quantities to serve as a standard reconnaissance aircraft. Its existence was unknown to the Allies until 1941 even though several different prototypes had flown well before the war. Called the "Flying Eye" of the German army, the Fw 189 succeeded on the Eastern Front beyond the most optimistic predictions. Its superb handling and agility made it a very difficult and elusive target for enemy fighters. Its phenomenal toughness was demonstrated by Fw 189s returning to bases safely with one tail shot or torn off by Soviet ramming attacks. Attempts were made to build special attack variants with small strong nacelles, but they were unsatisfactory. Ten Fw 189B trainers were specially manufactured and had a conventional nacelle with side-by-side dual controls in a normal cockpit, and above the trailing edge there was an observer. The Fw 189A-3 also had dual-controls but the normal "glasshouse" housing the crew. Gradually only the French factories with assembly at Bordeaux-Mérignac (the Dassault Mirage plant today) were producing the Fw 189, and they stopped as the Allies closed in during 1944. Many different models and a number of developments with more powerful engines were built, but only the basic types of A-1, A-2 (more armament) and A-3 appeared in substantial numbers. The production total of all versions numbered 846. </span>

It was operated as a reconnaissance and close support aircraft by the Luftwaffe (German Airforce) during World War II - mainly on the Eastern Front - where its combination of manoeuvrability, reliability and operational flexibility established the success of the design.

Despite their fragile appearance these aircraft proved to be remarkably sturdy and there are even reports of a 189 returning from combat with one tail-boom missing!

Our aircraft's tragic final mission...

V7+1H's final mission took place on 4th May 1943. The aircraft was to photograph Loukhi III Airbase from an altitude of 20,000ft and then continue north up the Murmansk-Leningrad Railway.

After a briefing the crew left Pontsalenjoki airfield at 03.06 hrs. Exactly 31 minutes later, a radio message was received indicating that they were under heavy attack by enemy fighters. This was the last message received from the aircraft.

http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/Young_Lothar.jpg

Behind the Russian lines in sub-zero conditions...

The pilot, Lothar Mothes, nose dived V7+1H in order to evade the attacking Russian Hurricanes but, as a result of damage sustained by their fire, was unable to clear the forest below to reach open ground. The aircraft struck the treetops - smashing off the tailbooms - before finally came to rest upside down, behind enemy lines, in the middle of the forest near Loukhi. Lothar was thrown unconscious from the wreckage and when he regained consciousness the badly injured pilot found one of his crew, Gunther Albrecht, dead and Kurt Lebrecht in a critical condition, his leg severed and clearly dying through loss of blood. Despite Lothar's every effort to save his colleague, Lebrecht tragically died at the crash scene.

Organising his thoughts in order to avoid capture by Russian patrols, Lothar started his long trek back to his base. It took him two weeks of walking, stumbling, wading and crawling in sub-zero conditions. He searched for berries but was forced to eat tree bark and grubs yet, incredibly, achieved what no one at his base thought possible. He evaded capture by the Russians and survived in the most hostile of conditions to return to his own lines. In addition to his head wounds the ordeal cost him 20kg in weight and severely frost bitten feet all of which required nine months in hospital and convalescing. He went on to fly a further 100+ reconnaissance missions.

http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/mothes.jpg
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Focke Wulf 189 Society supporter and V7+1H's last pilot, Lothar Mothes, reunited with his aircraft at Biggin Hill in 1996.</span>

Links:
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/index.htm
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/history.htm
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/progress.htm

woofiedog
01-24-2006, 01:20 AM
Came across this article about a Fw-189 restoration looking up some info...

The FW 189 usually carried a crew of three although it was capable of carrying up to five.

http://users.belgacom.net/airimg1/avion1/19272.jpe
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW"> Compared to contemporary aircraft, the Focke-Wulf Fw 189 Uhu (Owl) looked a little odd. Only after very successful flights tests and trials was the Fw 189 reluctantly ordered in small quantities to serve as a standard reconnaissance aircraft. Its existence was unknown to the Allies until 1941 even though several different prototypes had flown well before the war. Called the "Flying Eye" of the German army, the Fw 189 succeeded on the Eastern Front beyond the most optimistic predictions. Its superb handling and agility made it a very difficult and elusive target for enemy fighters. Its phenomenal toughness was demonstrated by Fw 189s returning to bases safely with one tail shot or torn off by Soviet ramming attacks. Attempts were made to build special attack variants with small strong nacelles, but they were unsatisfactory. Ten Fw 189B trainers were specially manufactured and had a conventional nacelle with side-by-side dual controls in a normal cockpit, and above the trailing edge there was an observer. The Fw 189A-3 also had dual-controls but the normal "glasshouse" housing the crew. Gradually only the French factories with assembly at Bordeaux-Mérignac (the Dassault Mirage plant today) were producing the Fw 189, and they stopped as the Allies closed in during 1944. Many different models and a number of developments with more powerful engines were built, but only the basic types of A-1, A-2 (more armament) and A-3 appeared in substantial numbers. The production total of all versions numbered 846. </span>

It was operated as a reconnaissance and close support aircraft by the Luftwaffe (German Airforce) during World War II - mainly on the Eastern Front - where its combination of manoeuvrability, reliability and operational flexibility established the success of the design.

Despite their fragile appearance these aircraft proved to be remarkably sturdy and there are even reports of a 189 returning from combat with one tail-boom missing!

Our aircraft's tragic final mission...

V7+1H's final mission took place on 4th May 1943. The aircraft was to photograph Loukhi III Airbase from an altitude of 20,000ft and then continue north up the Murmansk-Leningrad Railway.

After a briefing the crew left Pontsalenjoki airfield at 03.06 hrs. Exactly 31 minutes later, a radio message was received indicating that they were under heavy attack by enemy fighters. This was the last message received from the aircraft.

http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/Young_Lothar.jpg

Behind the Russian lines in sub-zero conditions...

The pilot, Lothar Mothes, nose dived V7+1H in order to evade the attacking Russian Hurricanes but, as a result of damage sustained by their fire, was unable to clear the forest below to reach open ground. The aircraft struck the treetops - smashing off the tailbooms - before finally came to rest upside down, behind enemy lines, in the middle of the forest near Loukhi. Lothar was thrown unconscious from the wreckage and when he regained consciousness the badly injured pilot found one of his crew, Gunther Albrecht, dead and Kurt Lebrecht in a critical condition, his leg severed and clearly dying through loss of blood. Despite Lothar's every effort to save his colleague, Lebrecht tragically died at the crash scene.

Organising his thoughts in order to avoid capture by Russian patrols, Lothar started his long trek back to his base. It took him two weeks of walking, stumbling, wading and crawling in sub-zero conditions. He searched for berries but was forced to eat tree bark and grubs yet, incredibly, achieved what no one at his base thought possible. He evaded capture by the Russians and survived in the most hostile of conditions to return to his own lines. In addition to his head wounds the ordeal cost him 20kg in weight and severely frost bitten feet all of which required nine months in hospital and convalescing. He went on to fly a further 100+ reconnaissance missions.

http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/mothes.jpg
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Focke Wulf 189 Society supporter and V7+1H's last pilot, Lothar Mothes, reunited with his aircraft at Biggin Hill in 1996.</span>

Links:
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/index.htm
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/history.htm
http://www.aeroplanemonthly.com/fw189society/progress.htm

Jagdgeschwader2
01-24-2006, 02:09 AM
Incredible. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif Not only is the plane found in good condition the pilot is still alive to sit at the controls again. Thanx for posting.


http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

woofiedog
01-24-2006, 08:59 AM
Also interesting was that the Owl was attacked and downed by Russian Hurricanes... I'd like to see this aircraft in flight today.

http://www.luftwaffepics.com/LCBW3/fw189-003.jpg

http://www.luftwaffepics.com/LCBW3/fw189-002.jpg
<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">Notice the Radar Unit on this aircraft??</span>

major_setback
01-24-2006, 03:25 PM
That was a good read, thanks!
I've always liked this aircraft.

woofiedog
01-25-2006, 01:43 AM
Was doing a bit more searching and came across this... a Nightfighter Version.

30 were modified about A-1 as night fighters, that served with the I/NJG 100 and NJG 5, this conversion counted on the radar 212 FuG Lichtenstein C-1 of interception and two MG15 of oblique shot upwards.

Link: http://www.studenten.net/customasp/axl/plane.asp?cat_id=10&ple_id=409&page=0

I think that one of the upwards mounted guns can be seen in the above photo along with the radar unit.

cawimmer430
01-26-2006, 05:12 AM
What blew me away was the article stating that this aircraft was "quite sturdy and tough". You seriously do not get that impression when looking at it. I suppose if I was an Allied figther pilot, I would have mistaken this plane for an "easy kill". If the Uhu had better defensive weapons, Allied pilots who thought this was an easy kill would be in for a surprise! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif