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luftluuver
09-07-2006, 08:57 PM
http://www.munster-express.ie/060818/news8.html

But, as usual the media has screwed up. Vervain, K190, was a RN corvette, not a RCN corvette.


It sank HMCS Vervain, a Corvette escorting the convoy.

p1ngu666
09-07-2006, 11:07 PM
woah, didnt know they lost so many in just a few months http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

warweapon2
09-07-2006, 11:12 PM
They lost TONS of them.. Probably one of the most unsucceful sub campaigns ever.

p1ngu666
09-07-2006, 11:14 PM
yeah

woofiedog
09-08-2006, 01:45 PM
A bit of a story about the HMS Amethyst.

http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/images/amethyst.jpg
The battered HMS Amethyst after her escape from the Yangtze

http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/images/simon3.jpg
Simon also received the Blue Cross Medal of the Dumb Friends League, and of 53 Dickin Medals issued, his was the only one ever awarded to a cat. When it was auctioned at Christie's in May 1993, it sold for 23,467, a record for the Dickin Medal, which has now been replaced by the PDSA's Silver Medal.

During WW2, Maria Dickin, founder of the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals, had instituted the Dickin Medal for acts of bravery in wartime by animals serving with the police, Civil Defence, or any branch of the armed forces. Cast in bronze, the medal bears the initials of the PDSA and the legends "FOR GALLANTRY" and "WE ALSO SERVE", surrounded by a laurel wreath. The medal ribbon is green, dark brown and pale blue, representing water, earth and air to symbolise the naval, army, civil defence and air forces. Kerans wasted no time in contacting the PDSA, recommending Simon for the Medal:

"There were a large number of rats on board that began to breed rapidly in the damaged portions of the ship. They represented a real menace to the health of the ship's company. Simon nobly rose to the occasion and after two months the rats were much diminished. Throughout the Incident Simon's behaviour was of the highest order. One would not have expected him to have survived a shell making a hole over a foot in diameter in a steel plate, yet after a few days Simon was a friendly as ever. His presence on the ship, together with Peggy the dog, was a decided factor in maintaining the high level of morale of the ship's company. They gave the ship an air of domesticity and normality in a situation which in other aspects was very trying."

Link: http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/simon.htm

slipBall
09-08-2006, 01:50 PM
There is a old U boat by me, off Montauk Point. The divers report that the paint was so good, that nothing grows on the hull. Even after all these years

Haigotron
09-08-2006, 04:03 PM
There is a old U boat by me, off Montauk Point. The divers report that the paint was so good, that nothing grows on the hull. Even after all these years

:O cool which one do u believe it could be?

TAW_Oilburner
09-08-2006, 05:30 PM
video of wreck
http://www.10barpics.com/quick%20time%20movies/u-1276.htm

Fork-N-spoon
09-09-2006, 01:27 AM
Originally posted by woofiedog:
A bit of a story about the HMS Amethyst.

John Wayne did it better two years earlier in the movie "Blood Alley."

woofiedog
09-09-2006, 02:02 AM
Fork-N-spoon... Seems like Robert Mitchum had a bit more action off screen and getting fired from the movie, before the movie Blood Alley was made. LoL http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

A web site with a few photo's of the U-Boats and the crews.

Links: http://centroeu.com/uboote/fotos.html

Also... U-1276 and a bit more.
http://www.ubootwaffe.net/crews/crews.cgi
http://www.ubootwaffe.net/crews/crewalbum.cgi
http://uboat.net/boats/u1276.htm
http://uboat.net/gallery/

woofiedog
09-09-2006, 02:15 AM
A story found on one of the sites listed above...

Survival
Surviving from a sunken U-boat
Arthur Baudzus 2004

Arthur Baudzus was a U-boat man on one of the Monsun boats, U-859. He is a member of a fairly exclusive club - he escaped from his sunken U-boat. Arthur is the author of a book based on his experiences at sea, his book is called U-859.
Available as paperback or ebook at
riverdaleebooks.com

Arthur welcomes questions or comments via the forum.

Arthur Baudzus is the author of U-859


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
U-boat men are well aware that a U-boat can sink and become their coffin; but this knowledge is pushed far away into the remotest corner of their brain and does not bother them. All that remains in their conscious and subconscious mind, is that the quickest exit is through the conning tower hatch.
When a sailor is turned into a U-boat man, he learns survival technique at the U-boat school at Neustadt. There is a mock-up central control room of a U-boat with a ten metre water column on top of it. The students enter the control room and the room is then flooded. Now the water rises up to one metre from the ceiling, where breathing air is trapped by a skirt which drops from the exit hatch above. After they are instructed in the use of the swim vest and the Draeger breathing apparatus, they dive one by one under the skirt and swim the ten metre to the surface.

Piece of cake.

Nobody tells the men that nearly always the depth of the ocean where the U-boat operates is not ten metre, but such that this escape procedure is impossible. At last the U-boat designers got the message, and in the later boats such skirt was deleted. The exhibition Boat in Laboe Germany has no such skirt.

So what happens when a U-boat sinks? I have experienced that and can remember the procedure well. I was on U-859, a long-range IXD2 boat, which after 20000 miles at sea was one hour from reaching its destination. Ten miles outside Penang in the Malakka Strait, Lieutenant Commander Hezlet lurked behind the periscope of his submarine and fired a salvo of three torpedoes at us.


I was resting in my bunk in the rear torpedo room. Suddenly an ear-shattering explosion and I am propelled out of my bunk. With my senses bluntened in total darkness the survival nerves of my body take control and I bounce like a rubber ball to the round hatch which leads to the E-room and from there to freedom. Before I can swing through the hatch, I am stopped by the fiery gas of the torpedo which had hit our boat midships, breaking it in two, and the next moment a metre-thick water jet sluices into our quarters. In just a few seconds our room is flooded, leaving enough breathing air trapped whilst our crippled half of U-859 sinks to the bottom of the sea.
With the rising water I am groping above me until my searching hands find the opening wheel of the torpedo loading hatch. Now my brain takes over from the control of the instinctive survival nerves and I am ready to make plans.

"What was the latest echo-sounding?" I scream into the surrounding blackness and wince because my voice sounds unfamiliar. I sounded more like Donald Duck.

"Fifty metre" an equally distorted voice sounded back.

I am relaxed now. My brain assures me that I am not going to die. Lady Luck had let us down, but at least she let us reach a survivable depth before she turned her thumb down on us. Two days earlier and we would have had a thousand metre of water under the keel. Now I am thinking..I realise that I can not open that hatch because then all air would escape and all men but I would drown. I have to give them time to find their survival gear which is stowed underneath the mattress in their bunk. I, myself have the choice whether to go and find my own survival gear somewhere in the blackness under water, or stay up here and be the first to exit. I decide to stay foot and escape with the last air.

After the "All clear" I open the hatch and slide out with the escaping air bubble into the tropical warm water. It was a long way up whilst all the way I release the pressure from my lungs. The air in them seems unexhaustable, but then I carried five times the normal capacity of air in my lungs. At long last I reach the surface to see the sun once more again.

Links:
http://www.u869.com/
http://uboat.net/boats/u859.htm

269GA-Veltro
09-09-2006, 07:02 AM
Originally posted by woofiedog:
A bit of a story about the HMS Amethyst.

http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/images/amethyst.jpg
The battered HMS Amethyst after her escape from the Yangtze

http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/images/simon3.jpg
Simon also received the Blue Cross Medal of the Dumb Friends League, and of 53 Dickin Medals issued, his was the only one ever awarded to a cat. When it was auctioned at Christie's in May 1993, it sold for 23,467, a record for the Dickin Medal, which has now been replaced by the PDSA's Silver Medal.

During WW2, Maria Dickin, founder of the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals, had instituted the Dickin Medal for acts of bravery in wartime by animals serving with the police, Civil Defence, or any branch of the armed forces. Cast in bronze, the medal bears the initials of the PDSA and the legends "FOR GALLANTRY" and "WE ALSO SERVE", surrounded by a laurel wreath. The medal ribbon is green, dark brown and pale blue, representing water, earth and air to symbolise the naval, army, civil defence and air forces. Kerans wasted no time in contacting the PDSA, recommending Simon for the Medal:

"There were a large number of rats on board that began to breed rapidly in the damaged portions of the ship. They represented a real menace to the health of the ship's company. Simon nobly rose to the occasion and after two months the rats were much diminished. Throughout the Incident Simon's behaviour was of the highest order. One would not have expected him to have survived a shell making a hole over a foot in diameter in a steel plate, yet after a few days Simon was a friendly as ever. His presence on the ship, together with Peggy the dog, was a decided factor in maintaining the high level of morale of the ship's company. They gave the ship an air of domesticity and normality in a situation which in other aspects was very trying."

Link: http://www.cwgcuser.org.uk/personal/moggies/simon/simon.htm

Thank for this, i didn't know about Simon. I love cats, nice info.

Dtools4fools
09-09-2006, 03:52 PM
woofiedog,

intersting story on the escape out of the sub. How about the other guys that were there down with him, they made it to the surface too or only him?
****

woofiedog
09-09-2006, 10:51 PM
Dtools4fools...

U-Boat Losses for 1944...

Link: http://uboat.net/men/men_lost-1944.htm

Also some Interactive Maps...

Link: http://uboat.net/about/members/maps.html

U-859, 5 Jul, 1944
One man was killed and three wounded, when the boat was attacked by a Catalina (RAF 262 Sqd/L) in the Indian Ocean. [Matrosenobergefreiter Hans Boldt]

U-859... Sunk 23 Sept, 1944 near Penang in the Straits of Malacca, in position 05.46N, 100.04E, by torpedoes from the British submarine HMS Trenchant. 47 dead and 20 survivors.

For a bit more info on U-Boat losses during WWII...

Link: http://uboat.net/men/men_lost.htm


269GA-Veltro... Thank's