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Aero_Shodanjo
11-21-2004, 09:01 AM
It's a fact that the measurement units in this sim are generally divided into two part: Metric and Imperial.

While i do understand the science behind the metric measurement (100cm = 1m, 1000m = 1km etc) and that there's an international standard for one meter (in Paris if I'm not mistaken), I'm still puzzled about the science behind imperial standard.

I know that 1 ft roughly equals to 30,5cm, and that 1 mile = 1,6km etc but where are those imperial standards come from actually?

Things got more mixed up when it comes to Gallons vs Litres, knot, nautical miles, you name it...

I dont mean to "declare" which is better than which because I believe that it's a matter of habit. Just curious about the standard used in Imperial units that's all.

Can anybody help?

Aero_Shodanjo
11-21-2004, 09:01 AM
It's a fact that the measurement units in this sim are generally divided into two part: Metric and Imperial.

While i do understand the science behind the metric measurement (100cm = 1m, 1000m = 1km etc) and that there's an international standard for one meter (in Paris if I'm not mistaken), I'm still puzzled about the science behind imperial standard.

I know that 1 ft roughly equals to 30,5cm, and that 1 mile = 1,6km etc but where are those imperial standards come from actually?

Things got more mixed up when it comes to Gallons vs Litres, knot, nautical miles, you name it...

I dont mean to "declare" which is better than which because I believe that it's a matter of habit. Just curious about the standard used in Imperial units that's all.

Can anybody help?

Zyzbot
11-21-2004, 09:30 AM
Much of it is explained here:

http://members.aol.com/JackProot/met/spvolas.html

Tully__
11-21-2004, 09:35 AM
Mile comes from the Latin word for 1000. It was originally based on 1000 right foot steps by the officer in charge of a military unit on a route march as a means of keeping track of the distance.

A nautical mile is one arc minute of latitude.

Metres were original derived by taking the distance from the pole to the equator and dividing it by 10,000,000. The standard is now expressed in a number of wavelengths of light emitted by a certain atom under specific circumstances.

Taylortony
11-21-2004, 10:54 AM
In Aviation just to really screw with your head we use metric inches, ie an inch is divided into tenths as opposed to the normal 8th or 16ths..... so o.25 is 1/4 of an inch http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif for all of the older stuff like boeings http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

now it gets stupid when you work on a small Aircraft like a Socata Trinidad etc, as the European Airframe is all in Metric, but the American engine is in Imperial..... ahhh nothing like standardization....

jeroen-79
11-21-2004, 11:04 AM
The best part of standards is that there are so many to choose from.

http://www.joshmadison.com/software/convert/