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blakduk
09-22-2005, 07:19 PM
I enjoyed watching a BBC show on TV during the past few weeks of a group of guys learning to fly a Spitfire trainer ('Spitfre Ace').
An observation made by one of the survivors of the battle was that while the novices were particularly vulnerable, the expert fliers who were excellent aerobatic pilots also got into a lot of trouble- he noted that their maneuvores were 'too precise' and therefore 'too predictable'. He argued that pilots who were less precise in their flying were assisted by the chaos of the erratic path they took that made it more difficult for an attacker to get a sustained bead on them.
I find it quite easy to shoot down AI aircraft if i manage to get behind them whereas a 'live' pilot is often extremely difficult. I suspect its due to the above reason. Anyone else noted this?

I was also interested to note that he claimed to fly with rudder trim on- so that if he was bounced the attacker would mess up his deflection shot because his nose wasnt pointing in his flight path.

blakduk
09-22-2005, 07:19 PM
I enjoyed watching a BBC show on TV during the past few weeks of a group of guys learning to fly a Spitfire trainer ('Spitfre Ace').
An observation made by one of the survivors of the battle was that while the novices were particularly vulnerable, the expert fliers who were excellent aerobatic pilots also got into a lot of trouble- he noted that their maneuvores were 'too precise' and therefore 'too predictable'. He argued that pilots who were less precise in their flying were assisted by the chaos of the erratic path they took that made it more difficult for an attacker to get a sustained bead on them.
I find it quite easy to shoot down AI aircraft if i manage to get behind them whereas a 'live' pilot is often extremely difficult. I suspect its due to the above reason. Anyone else noted this?

I was also interested to note that he claimed to fly with rudder trim on- so that if he was bounced the attacker would mess up his deflection shot because his nose wasnt pointing in his flight path.

SnapdLikeAMutha
09-22-2005, 07:31 PM
If sloppy flying is good then I must make Erich Hartmann look like Eric Estrada

MarkGos
09-22-2005, 09:04 PM
Blakduk,

I was interested in that comment also. Great show (Hey it had a warbird in it and no love story - gotta be good http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif)

What I thought was brilliant was getting the BOB vet back into the plane and having him do a barel roll - brought a tear to my eye. You could see and hear the emotion in his voice. Stiring stuff

effte
09-25-2005, 01:58 AM
Tell me about it!

I brought all the good habits with me into Il-2. Coordinated flying, smooth precise manouevering... and got my *** handed to me on a plate repeatedly until those of the EAF trainers who had yet to write me off as beyond hope got me to start being a bit more erratical on the controls when defensive.

ClnlSandersLite
09-25-2005, 03:01 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by MarkGos:
Blakduk,

Hey it had a warbird in it and no love story - gotta be good http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yeah, a warbird is enough of a love story in it self for me... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif

F19_Ob
09-25-2005, 03:51 AM
Indeed.
I avoid to "center the ball" quite often in combat and in nemy airspace.
A tiny sideslip may save me from a bounce sometimes. I give rudder to a faraway chaser who is firing at me wich usually makes him miss.
Also going in slow waves when flying straight have saved me from highspeed passes where it is difficult to adjust the aim.

I try to constantly remind myself to make turns, rudders and waving now and then as an addition to my look-around-routine, wich may easily be forgotten if one tries to keep track of wingmen at same time.