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Realjambo
03-17-2007, 04:55 PM
Just like the SH3 Rolling Quiz, but now the forums have seperated for clarity, here is where you can pose questions and show off your knowledge of all things from the Pacific war theatre and hopefully we can all learn a few things about our favourite subject! Usual rules apply:

1. Only one question 'live' at any one time - and must be related to the Pacific war theatre - and submarines!
2. When setting a question please have a source to back up your answer - be it a book, film, website, DVD or such like
3. Whoever gets the correct answer gets to pose the next question, so where possible, please have a new question to pose
4. Should a new question not be forthcoming from the previous correct forum member, it will be opned up to anyone who has a new question.
5. Questions not answered within 48 hours will be superceded by a new one (Don't worry - the thread will be *bumped* if need be, but the intention is to live up to it's name - 'Rolling Quiz')

Lastly, I encourage the use of photo's and maps etc when posing or answering questions - just makes it more of a visual experience.

All clear? Good! Let's get's learning!

I'll start us off with a relatively easy one that should be found after a little 'Googling':

Q: Which US sub is credited with the sinking of the largest single IJN vessel - and for what tonnage?

Merlin367
03-17-2007, 05:13 PM
The USS ARCHERFISH is credited with sinking the IJN Carrier SHINANO which fully loaded was worth 72000 tons.

Now assuming my info is correct what glaring technical oversight did the IJN make that aided the Shinano's sinking?

Realjambo
03-17-2007, 05:23 PM
Quick Merlin367 - in just 17 minutes! although my source, Clay Blair Jnr's 'Combat Patrol, cites the Shinano at 59,00 tonnes sunk. Not to worry, I'm in a good mood and impessed by your swift response.

So Merlin367's question stands:

What glaring technical oversight did the IJN make that aided the Shinano's sinking

Crosseye76
03-17-2007, 06:08 PM
There were 2 major ones. 1) Technical - There is evidence to suggest the join between the bottom of the armor belt and hull was defective. That if would deform and push in in the case of a torpedo impact. 2) Operational. She was not complete. Sailing with an untrained crew, Watertight doors not in place, stuffing boxes with no WT seals, Etc. ment she she was lost to progressive flooding when the Captain pushed her too fast to clear the area.


If I'm right here's my Quiz Question: Which Submarine performed the first offical Submarine Lifeguard mission, and where was it ?

tambor198
03-17-2007, 06:13 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Quick Merlin367 - in just 17 minutes! although my source, Clay Blair Jnr's 'Combat Patrol, cites the Shinano at 59,00 tonnes sunk. Not to worry, I'm in a good mood and impessed by your swift response.

So Merlin367's question stands:

What glaring technical oversight did the IJN make that aided the Shinano's sinking


I'm going from memory here, but if I remember correctly the Japanese had not completed the bulkheads and watertight integrity of the Shinano yet and when the Archerfish's torpedoes hit the crew could not contain the flooding that was caused by the torpedo explosions.



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

vietvettwo
03-17-2007, 09:42 PM
Not sure if this counts as a technical error, but I'm fairly sure that I read somewhere along the way that the IJN just wasn't big on damage control training in general. So, if the ship was less than complete to start off with, and the ship's crew isn't well trained in damage control, things can get ugly in a hurry.

Merlin367
03-18-2007, 06:52 AM
Crosseye76 Nailed it. That matches the info I read, Good Job. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Realjambo
03-19-2007, 01:19 PM
Crosseye's question may get a bit lost in the posts, so I'll re-iterate it:

Which Submarine performed the first offical Submarine Lifeguard mission, and where was it ?

Osakajoe
03-19-2007, 01:58 PM
Would that be Skate at Wake?? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

tambor198
03-19-2007, 05:08 PM
OsakaJoe has the right of it. It was the Skate at Wake Island on October 5, 1943.



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WilhelmSchulz.
03-19-2007, 07:40 PM
Q: what was the first <STRIKE>U-Boat</STRIKE> U.S submarine to be sunk in WWII?

tambor198
03-19-2007, 07:51 PM
Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz.:
Q: what was the first <STRIKE>U-Boat</STRIKE> U.S submarine to be sunk in WWII?


The USS Sealion was sunk by Japanese high-level bombers at Cavite in the Philippines (Dec 10, 1941).



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

tambor198
03-19-2007, 08:33 PM
I guess its my turn now. My question is a two-parter.


What was the first major Japanese Man-of-War sunk by a US Submarine in The Pacific? Name the US Sub who did the sinking?



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WilhelmSchulz.
03-19-2007, 09:14 PM
Originally posted by tambor198:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz.:
Q: what was the first <STRIKE>U-Boat</STRIKE> U.S submarine to be sunk in WWII?


The USS Sealion was sunk by Japanese high-level bombers at Cavite in the Philippines (Dec 10, 1941).



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yep! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

tambor198
03-19-2007, 10:11 PM
Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz.:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by tambor198:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WilhelmSchulz.:
Q: what was the first <STRIKE>U-Boat</STRIKE> U.S submarine to be sunk in WWII?


The USS Sealion was sunk by Japanese high-level bombers at Cavite in the Philippines (Dec 10, 1941).



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yep! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Hey, WS. I've been meaning to ask you a couple of questions about your sig. The first one is did you make the sig or someone else do it, because I've a few other people with similiar sigs. The second one is just my opinion, but instead of Lockwood's Inn, I think the Royal Hawaiian would be better. Like I said, just my opinion. Great sig, by the way, I like it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

switchman72
03-20-2007, 10:35 AM
Okay Here's a Brain teaser. 3 part question.
What was the name of the U.S. submarine that holds the record for most kills in the Pacific theater? Mind you not total tonnage, but total kills? 2) Name the Submarine class. 3)How many confirmed kills did it record?

switchman72
03-20-2007, 10:41 AM
Oh almost forgot. my source was military channel documentary on submarines of WWII.

Realjambo
03-20-2007, 11:41 AM
What was the name of the U.S. submarine that holds the record for most kills in the Pacific theater? Mind you not total tonnage, but total kills? 2) Name the Submarine class. 3)How many confirmed kills did it record?


Great question switchman! I look forward to reading the answer, if I don't find it myself http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

WilhelmSchulz.
03-20-2007, 07:42 PM
Originally posted by switchman72:
Okay Here's a Brain teaser. 3 part question.
What was the name of the U.S. submarine that holds the record for most kills in the Pacific theater? Mind you not total tonnage, but total kills? 2) Name the Submarine class. 3)How many confirmed kills did it record?
The USS Kingfish(SS-234) a Gato class sub, with 25 kills.

WilhelmSchulz.
03-20-2007, 08:09 PM
Originally posted by tambor198:
Hey, WS. I've been meaning to ask you a couple of questions about your sig. The first one is did you make the sig or someone else do it, because I've a few other people with similiar sigs. The second one is just my opinion, but instead of Lockwood's Inn, I think the Royal Hawaiian would be better. Like I said, just my opinion. Great sig, by the way, I like it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

No I didn't make it my self and the rest check your PM.

switchman72
03-21-2007, 01:09 AM
ooooh close but no cigar Wilhelm. I would like to know where you found that information though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

switchman72
03-21-2007, 01:15 AM
I dont want to tie up this post too long with just my question, its time for someone else to educate us.

The answer is USS. Tautog, Tambor class, 26 confirmed kills.

switchman72
03-21-2007, 01:43 AM
USS Tautog otherwise known as the terrible T. (SS 199)

mariuszj1939
03-21-2007, 02:10 AM
Originally posted by switchman72:
its time for someone else to educate us.


That's not difficult but I like such stories. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

One of US submarines in beg. February 1942 loaded and then evacuated special cargo to USA.
Tell us name of submarine, weight and name of cargo ?

tambor198
03-21-2007, 10:17 AM
[/QUOTE]

One of US submarines in beg. February 1942 loaded and then evacuated special cargo to USA.
Tell us name of submarine, weight and name of cargo ?[/QUOTE]



USS Trout. The cargo was twenty tons of gold and silver coinage from the Bank of Manila, that US and Philippine officials didn't want to fall into Japanese hands.



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

WilhelmSchulz.
03-21-2007, 12:55 PM
Originally posted by switchman72:
ooooh close but no cigar Wilhelm. I would like to know where you found that information though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
Valor at Sea/Subrecords (http://www.valoratsea.com/records1.htm)

WilhelmSchulz.
03-21-2007, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by switchman72:
ooooh close but no cigar Wilhelm. I would like to know where you found that information though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
DOH I looked at the wrong spot. I thought the # order was the # of Ships sunk. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Realjambo
03-21-2007, 03:09 PM
Valor at Sea/Subrecords


Excellent resource there Wilhelm!

mariuszj1939
03-22-2007, 02:20 AM
Originally posted by tambor198:

USS Trout. The cargo was twenty tons of gold and silver coinage from the Bank of Manila, that US and Philippine officials didn't want to fall into Japanese hands.

tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Good answer http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

http://img176.imageshack.us/img176/7435/0820207hd9.jpg (http://imageshack.us)
http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/7244/0820213oh4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

Realjambo
03-24-2007, 05:28 PM
*Bump!*

tambor198
03-25-2007, 03:39 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
*Bump!*


I'll try running with the ball, RJ. I'll try a question I posted earlier and wasn't answered.


What was the first major Japanese Man-of-War sunk by a US Submarine in The Pacific? Name the US Sub who did the sinking?



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
03-25-2007, 03:46 PM
Thanks TAmbor - I guess a lot of people a 'a bit busy in the pacific' at the moment, so I appreciate you taking the time to kick start the quiz http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

tambor198
03-25-2007, 04:44 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Thanks TAmbor - I guess a lot of people a 'a bit busy in the pacific' at the moment, so I appreciate you taking the time to kick start the quiz http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif


No problem, RJ. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif I have more than a passing interest in the Pacific and the SHIV quiz is a good way to test my knowledge. Well back to SHIV, man this game rocks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
04-20-2007, 09:34 AM
*Bump* http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

subhadar
04-20-2007, 09:43 AM
1st U.S. sub lost on patrol and where ?

Realjambo
04-20-2007, 05:00 PM
Good question! Thanks for getting involved. *RJ Scuttles off to the library at Jambo Towers*

NaKacu
04-20-2007, 06:12 PM
..aah, but the question is "on patrol" so it has to be S-36 on January 20, 1942 - grounded on the Taka Bakang Reef. (actually 2nd sub lost in the war, 1st on patrol)

NaKacu
04-20-2007, 06:31 PM
What was the first major Japanese Man-of-War sunk by a US Submarine in The Pacific? Name the US Sub who did the sinking?

Sailfish - Dec 3rd 1943 sank Chuyo - First Japanese Aircraft Carrier sent to Davy Jones' locker. Responsible commander? Robert Ward!

Realjambo
04-21-2007, 04:39 PM
NaKacu - pending confirmation from the question setter, can you prepare your question to maintain the 'Rolling' element of the quiz?

NaKacu
04-21-2007, 05:10 PM
Actually... I am realizing that my resources are bit inaccurate... I don't believe I guessed right on the "first major man-of-war".
Here is why:
The first major Japanese warship lost to submarines during WW-II was the
heavy cruiser Kako which fell victim to S-44 (Moore) on Aug. 10, 1942.
Little Known Facts (http://ussubvetsofworldwarii.org/Little_Known_Facts.html)

But I am quite sure about the SS-36 All 52 Subs Lost in WWII (http://www.csp.navy.mil/ww2boats.htm).

So since I got at least one right -- here we go (we'll go easy here).

.
.
.


Name a US submarine credited with sinking a German U-Boat.

Realjambo
04-21-2007, 05:16 PM
Appreciate your honesty there Nakacu...and a good question - kind of a 'cross promotional' thing yo have going on there! like your style! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

iacuras
04-21-2007, 08:09 PM
Originally posted by NaKacu:

Name a US submarine credited with sinking a German U-Boat.

Easy, The USS Besugo (SS-321) sunk the German U-boat U-183 on April 23, 1945. The USS Besugo was a Balao class sub commissioned in June 1944. U-183 was a type IXC/40 U-boat commissioned 1 April, 1942. She was sunk on her sixth war patrol in the Java Sea.

NaKacu
04-21-2007, 08:55 PM
iacuras -- yep, you got it.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

iacuras
04-21-2007, 09:35 PM
Ok here's my question:

What was the first ship sunk by a Gato class submarine, and which sub was it?

mariuszj1939
04-22-2007, 03:19 AM
Originally posted by iacuras:
Ok here's my question:

What was the first ship sunk by a Gato class submarine, and which sub was it?

I'm not sure but why not try :

4th May 1942 USS Greeling (SS-213) sunk Kinjosan Maru

NaKacu
04-22-2007, 08:24 AM
SS-211 ( Gudgeon ) sunk the IJN submarine I-173 on Jan 27th, 1942. This also marks the first enemy warship sunk in the WWII.

Little Known Facts (http://ussubvetsofworldwarii.org/Little_Known_Facts.html)

iacuras
04-22-2007, 09:47 AM
Originally posted by mariuszj1939:

I'm not sure but why not try :

4th May 1942 USS Greeling (SS-213) sunk Kinjosan Maru

Congrats you got it right!!


Originally posted by NaKacu:

SS-211 ( Gudgeon ) sunk the IJN submarine I-173 on Jan 27th, 1942. This also marks the first enemy warship sunk in the WWII.

Unfortunatly The Gudgeon was a Tambor class boat, not a Gato class boat.

mariuszj1939
04-22-2007, 09:55 AM
One of US submarines in 1944 due to lack of sea targets attacked Sachalin by deck gun and
moreover eight crew members landed and .... ?
(one of the most interesting US sub stories)
Tell name of submarine and what they finally destroyed ? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

NaKacu
04-22-2007, 01:38 PM
eight crew members landed and ....

Demolished a train track with 55 lbs of demolition charges. Twelve freight cars, two passenger cars, one mail car and the locomotive were sent into a pile of wreckage.

That was Barb on July 22-23 of 1945 though, so it might not be the same boat we are talking about.

(source: The Silent Service by Hughston E Lowder)

NaKacu
04-22-2007, 01:43 PM
Unfortunatly The Gudgeon was a Tambor class boat, not a Gato class boat.

Darn! But you're right. The first Gato class submarine was actually called Gato and it was sthe SS-212 -- so my Gudgeon was the last one in the Tambor series. (off by one, doh!)

mariuszj1939
04-22-2007, 02:25 PM
Originally posted by NaKacu:
[QUOTE]eight crew members landed and ....

Demolished a train track

That was Barb

Yes good answer http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Over to you!

NaKacu
04-22-2007, 08:13 PM
Aight, this one is rather easy too.

Which US WWII submarine holds the all time record of sinking 3 enemy submarines, all in one patrol?

iacuras
04-23-2007, 04:25 AM
Originally posted by NaKacu:
Aight, this one is rather easy too.

Which US WWII submarine holds the all time record of sinking 3 enemy submarines, all in one patrol?

The USS Batfish (SS-310) sank three jap subs over the period of 10 FEB 1945 to 13 FEB 1945. She sank RO-55, RO-112, and RO-113.

NaKacu
04-23-2007, 07:03 AM
Right-O - Batfish is the answer.

NaKacu
04-25-2007, 11:45 PM
bumphttp://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/crackwhip.gif

Realjambo
06-07-2007, 12:52 PM
*Bump*

Open to anyone to post a question. The 'Rolling' seems to stopped rolling a while! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 01:04 PM
What sub still sits, above the surface, and recognizable, where it was abandoned during the war?

kikn79
06-07-2007, 01:15 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
What sub still sits, above the surface, and recognizable, where it was abandoned during the war?

The USS Darter. Although from the pictures I've seen lately, it is hardly recognizable...

Chuck

Edit: Here's a pic of how she looks today.

http://i205.photobucket.com/albums/bb93/kikn79/DarterToday.jpg

Realjambo
06-07-2007, 01:21 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Anyone know the history of it? How did it come to be where it is now?

OpiesEye
06-07-2007, 01:33 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Anyone know the history of it? How did it come to be where it is now?

try here, interesting story.

http://www.csp.navy.mil/ww2boats/darter.htm

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 01:33 PM
Right kikn79.

If memory serves right, she was making a head on run at some destroyers or cruisers in a strait (can't remember offhand), and run up Bombay Shoals. Draft was reported at 4ft.

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 01:34 PM
kikn, where did you get that pic? I've been scouring the net for recent pics of her with no avail.

kikn79
06-07-2007, 01:35 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Anyone know the history of it? How did it come to be where it is now?

Darter along with her sister ship Dace, had just sunk a heavy cruiser and they were trying to do an "end run" to get more shots. As there last star fix was several days old and it was overcast, they were going off dead reckoning and ran aground on Bombay Shoals. After repeated unsuccessful attemps at backing her off, she radio'd for help and Dace took all the crew members off.

The scuttling charges had problems so Dace shot a couple of torpedo's at it, but they just blew up on the shoal. She shot several rounds from the 4" into it and left with 160+ men.

The Nautilus came by and shot 50+ shots with her 6" gun.

The entire crew from the Darter was given the new construction boat Menhaden.

Please forgive any inaccuracies as I am going strictly off memory here....

Chuck

kikn79
06-07-2007, 01:38 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
kikn, where did you get that pic? I've been scouring the net for recent pics of her with no avail.

From my favorite submarine info site:
http://www.navsource.org/

Chuck

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 01:39 PM
Thats why I missed it on NavSource....It was added last month. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

kikn79
06-07-2007, 01:40 PM
Here's my question for the group:

What skipper had the dubious destinction of losing 2 boats in WWII?

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 01:46 PM
LtCmdr Francis E. Brown, skipper of S-39 & S-44.

kikn79
06-07-2007, 01:56 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
LtCmdr Francis E. Brown, skipper of S-39 & S-44.

Correct!! Nice work!!

Chuck

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 02:03 PM
What submarine claims the lasts bombardment of WW2?

USMC1979
06-07-2007, 02:07 PM
was it a us sub

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 02:11 PM
yes.

Minoos
06-07-2007, 02:17 PM
Could it be USS Barb?


In the early morning hours of June 22, 1945,
Barb, (Fluckey) fired a dozen 5-inch rockets into
the town of Hokkaido from 5000 yards off shore.

USMC1979
06-07-2007, 02:18 PM
What was the name of the us sub that made the impossible shot at Guam to sink the tokai maru?

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 02:23 PM
Not Barb...this sub made it attack just days before the ceasefire.

wh1skea
06-07-2007, 02:24 PM
Originally posted by USMC1979:
What was the name of the us sub that made the impossible shot at Guam to sink the tokai maru?

USS Flying Fish damaged her, and about 7 months later USS Snapper sunk her, both while she was in the harbor.

USMC1979
06-07-2007, 02:28 PM
I knew that since i saw deep sea dectives on the history channel

USMC1979
06-07-2007, 02:54 PM
Who was the top sub commander for the us during ww2 in the pacific?

wh1skea
06-08-2007, 06:37 AM
to bump my question I asked yesterday.......What US sub claims the last bombardment of WW2?

kikn79
06-08-2007, 08:33 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
to bump my question I asked yesterday.......What US sub claims the last bombardment of WW2?

That is a great question. I've looked high and low and cannot find any information on it. I haven't given up yet, though!!!

Chuck

jlf1961
06-08-2007, 10:44 AM
Okay, how about this, what WW2 fleet boat is still floating and in the same condition she was in at the end of WW2?

catlegwest
06-08-2007, 10:45 AM
Okay, how about this, what WW2 fleet boat is still floating and in the same condition she was in at the end of WW2?
USS PAMPANITO (SS-383)?

jlf1961
06-08-2007, 10:55 AM
Originally posted by catlegwest:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Okay, how about this, what WW2 fleet boat is still floating and in the same condition she was in at the end of WW2?
USS PAMPANITO (SS-383)? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I just discovered there are two, and that is one.

catlegwest
06-08-2007, 11:00 AM
I just discovered there are two, and that is one.
What's the other one, the Cod?

wh1skea
06-08-2007, 11:15 AM
Its Cod...Pampinito has a tourist entrance built in...aka stairs.

jlf1961
06-09-2007, 12:39 AM
Actually, I was thinking of the USS Bowfin, moored next to the Arizona Memorial.

Flamewagon
06-09-2007, 03:20 AM
Could the answer be the H.M.S Belfast moored on the Thames in London.

HMS Belfast served throughout the Second World War, playing a leading part in the destruction of the battle cruiser Scharnhorst, and also the Normandy Landings. In service with the Royal Navy until 1965, she was saved for the nation in 1971 as a unique reminder of Britain's naval heritage.

Taken from this website: http://hmsbelfast.iwm.org.uk/

Flamewagon
06-09-2007, 03:26 AM
Here is a question, the ARA General Belgrano was sunk during the Falklands campaign but the ship was originally a WWII boat named what?
This ship was the first to be sunk by a nuclear powered Sub in hostile conditions.

CaptainSquid
06-09-2007, 03:38 AM
ARA General Belgrano

USS Phoenix (CL-46)http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

wh1skea
06-10-2007, 09:03 AM
Answer to my last question, what US sub claims the last bombardment of WW2? USS Tigrone SS-419
USS Tigrone (SS-419) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Tigrone_%28SS-419%29)

VikingGrandad
06-10-2007, 10:04 AM
Good to see this quiz up and running again.

Just a reminder of RJ's rules, particularly rule #1, as we seem to have had new questions asked before the current one has been answered or expired:


Originally posted by Realjambo:
1. Only one question 'live' at any one time - and must be related to the Pacific war theatre - and submarines!
2. When setting a question please have a source to back up your answer - be it a book, film, website, DVD or such like
3. Whoever gets the correct answer gets to pose the next question, so where possible, please have a new question to pose
4. Should a new question not be forthcoming from the previous correct forum member, it will be opned up to anyone who has a new question.
5. Questions not answered within 48 hours will be superceded by a new one (Don't worry - the thread will be *bumped* if need be, but the intention is to live up to it's name - 'Rolling Quiz')

Lastly, I encourage the use of photo's and maps etc when posing or answering questions - just makes it more of a visual experience.

Achtungbaby1976
06-10-2007, 08:37 PM
I thought the Silversides was also still floating and unmodified.

Achtungbaby1976
06-11-2007, 06:20 AM
Ok, since nobody else seems to be interested in asking anything right now, I've got one.

Which submarine became known as the "Kangaroo Express" and why?

wh1skea
06-11-2007, 06:44 AM
USS Growler. During the incident in which she lost her skipper, Growler's bow was bent at sharp angle. She was placed in the drydocks in Brisbane for repairs. A nickle kangaroo was painted on her bow and she was dubbed The Kangaroo Express.

Achtungbaby1976
06-11-2007, 07:14 AM
Wow, that was quick.

Here's the old nose:
http://i14.tinypic.com/6hcouwg.jpg

Here's the Aussie made replacement:
http://i15.tinypic.com/5ykqjjd.jpg

wh1skea
06-11-2007, 07:15 AM
What is the only US submarine to rescue more than 30 aviators?

tambor198
06-11-2007, 11:05 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
What is the only US submarine to rescue more than 30 aviators?


USS Tigrone - 31 aviators
USS Tang - 22 aviators
USS Ray - 21 aviators



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

wh1skea
06-11-2007, 11:12 AM
yep, Tigrone, again. You have the next question, tambor.

tambor198
06-11-2007, 11:53 AM
I've got a two parter for you guys. On October 23, 1944 the USS Darter and USS Dace encountered a Japanese Fleet of 32 ships heading to intercept the American Invasion at Letye Gulf.

Firing ten torpedoes at two targets the USS Darter sank one heavy cruiser and severely damaged another. Name the Japanese cruisers.


The USS Dace fired six torpedo at what she thought was a battleship but was really was a heavy cruiser. This cruiser also sank, what was the name of this ship.



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

wm4668
06-11-2007, 12:01 PM
The cruisers sunk were Atago and Takao, the damaged cruiser Maya.

wh1skea
06-11-2007, 12:05 PM
Darter - Atago sunk, Takao damaged
Dace - Maya sunk

tambor198
06-11-2007, 04:44 PM
Correct, guys. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

wh1skea
06-12-2007, 06:19 AM
Who gets the next question? While wm4668 and I listed the same ships, we listed different ones as sunk/damaged.

wm4668
06-12-2007, 10:28 AM
@wh1skea Rechecked my sources http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif, you were right,I defer to you, http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif please take the next question

wh1skea
06-12-2007, 11:05 AM
OK, which US sub sank the most destroyers?

catlegwest
06-12-2007, 11:14 AM
OK, which US sub sank the most destroyers?
Hit 'em Harder?

wh1skea
06-12-2007, 11:16 AM
yep. Janac credits Harder for 4 destroyer kills.

tambor198
06-12-2007, 07:52 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
yep. Janac credits Harder for 4 destroyer kills.



Three of those kills were on the same patrol. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif



tambor198 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 11:03 AM
Waiting on catlegwest's question.......

catlegwest
06-13-2007, 11:08 AM
What famous aviator did Richard O'Kane (Commander, USS Tang) meet in the secret POW camp in Japan, and what was the camp's name?

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 11:14 AM
he met Pappy Boyington at the Omori camp near Tokyo

catlegwest
06-13-2007, 11:19 AM
Very good! But, I thought the camp was Ofuna. Wiki agrees with you.

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 11:26 AM
What submarine played the part of the infamously pink USS Sea Tiger?

catlegwest
06-13-2007, 11:32 AM
What submarine played the part of the infamously pink USS Sea Tiger?

Gotta go to a meeting - leave you with this - the conning tower of the boat wh1skea seeks is on display "somewhere" and for a time was painted pink until the humor wore off...

USMC1979
06-13-2007, 11:44 AM
Who can name the fleet boat that spotted the japanese fleet during the battle of the phillipines in oct 44?

USMC1979
06-13-2007, 11:49 AM
i stand corrected. what two us boats spotted the japanese fleet in the battle of the phillipinees in oct 44

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 11:49 AM
USMC...we already have a question going http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif

USMC1979
06-13-2007, 12:07 PM
the answer is uss balao.

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 12:12 PM
yep, now you may post your question http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 12:35 PM
If your wanting to stand with the last one you asked....the answer is USS Darter and USS Dace.

USMC1979
06-13-2007, 12:40 PM
that is correct. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 01:14 PM
What is the only currently active sub to see service in WW2? Its current role is as a trainer.

catlegwest
06-13-2007, 02:35 PM
What is the only currently active sub to see service in WW2? Its current role is as a trainer.
USS Snipe? HMS Propwash? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

wh1skea
06-13-2007, 03:01 PM
Originally posted by catlegwest:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">What is the only currently active sub to see service in WW2? Its current role is as a trainer.
USS Snipe? HMS Propwash? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

TheDuke1066
06-13-2007, 04:30 PM
USS Argonaut? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

catlegwest
06-13-2007, 09:57 PM
Chief Elbow-Grease can't find it - gives up! What is it?

wh1skea
06-14-2007, 06:23 AM
Ya gotta wait the 48 hours for me to reveal the answer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

kikn79
06-14-2007, 06:36 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
What is the only currently active sub to see service in WW2? Its current role is as a trainer.

SS-478 USS Cutlass which is now in the Taiwanese Navy as the Hai Shih 791

Chuck

catlegwest
06-14-2007, 08:32 AM
SS-478 USS Cutlass which is now in the Taiwanese Navy as the Hai Shih 791
That's incredible - did not know that! Salute to kikn79 and wh1skea!

Article in Taipei Times re: 63rd anniversary of "Sea Lion" (new name) (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2007/04/17/2003356990) (loads slow but worth it)

Originally a Tench class, now a GUPPY, natch.

wh1skea
06-15-2007, 06:36 AM
kikn has the next question!

Realjambo
06-15-2007, 04:56 PM
Just wanted to say I'm back from my holiday and am really pleased to see that the quiz is still rolling. Good work! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

mariuszj1939
06-18-2007, 02:26 AM
Who is posting next question , if any ?

wh1skea
06-18-2007, 06:22 AM
kikn79 is supposed to post the next question

mariuszj1939
06-18-2007, 06:47 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
kikn79 is supposed to post the next question

5. Questions not answered within 48 hours will be superceded by a new one (Don't worry - the thread will be *bumped* if need be, but the intention is to live up to it's name - 'Rolling Quiz')

but when should be posted quiz question ?

Realjambo
06-18-2007, 06:55 AM
The next question is open to anyone now. Mariuszj, if you have a question please go ahead and post it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

mariuszj1939
06-18-2007, 07:39 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
The next question is open to anyone now. Mariuszj, if you have a question please go ahead and post it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

OK

29th Nov. 1944 American sub run after manoeuvring big target .... during 6 hrs at night with full speed (20 knots) (just 1 knot difference between sub and /biggest in her class/ target).
Finally she sunk her at 3 am - 6 explosions (target sailed in virgin patrol)

What was sunk + tonnage and by whom ?

wh1skea
06-18-2007, 07:53 AM
USS Archer-fish sinks carrier Shinano for 59,000 tons

mariuszj1939
06-19-2007, 01:53 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
USS Archer-fish sinks carrier Shinano for 59,000 tons

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Yes , the biggest WWII carrier
Joseph F.Enright Archerfish

Over to you

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 06:22 AM
What war time acheivement makes USS Sealion (SS-315) unique from all the other US subs?

wm4668
06-19-2007, 06:29 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
What war time acheivement makes USS Sealion (SS-315) unique from all the other US subs?

Only US sub to sink a battleship - IJN Kongo 21/11/44

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 07:07 AM
congrats! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

wm4668
06-19-2007, 10:41 AM
Here's an interesting one!

Which Commander of which British submarine was awarded the US Legion of Merit for sinking which Cruiser (the last major warship sunk by a British Sub until the Belgrano in 1982 (was it really 25 yrs ago?)

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 11:19 AM
HMS Trenchant commanded by CMDR A.R. Hezlet sunk the Japanese cruiser Ashigara.

wm4668
06-19-2007, 11:28 AM
Spot on - over to you Wh1skea http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 11:30 AM
which US sub endured the longest submergance while on patrol during ww2?

kikn79
06-19-2007, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
which US sub endured the longest submergance while on patrol during ww2?

The USS Puffer on her first war patrol had a record setting 38 hour submergence because of enemy fire.

Chuck

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 12:07 PM
I had 37 hours and 45 minutes, but yes, it was the Puffer.

Down at bottom of page (http://www.bowfin.org/website/bowfin/bowfin_systems/refrig/refrig.htm)

kikn79
06-19-2007, 12:09 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
I had 37 hours and 45 minutes, but yes, it was the Puffer.

They must have rounded up.... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Which U.S. submarine commander named his boat's four engines Matthew, Mark, Luke and John?

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 12:41 PM
CMDR Frank D. Latta of USS Narwhal

kikn79
06-19-2007, 12:46 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
CMDR Frank D. Latta of USS Narwhal

I'm not saying that is not correct, but that isn't who I'm thinking of...

Chuck

Realjambo
06-19-2007, 12:49 PM
Can I just remind everyone to state where your question, and answer, is sourced from http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Rule "2. When setting a question please have a source to back up your answer - be it a book, film, website, DVD or such like."

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 12:55 PM
USS Narwhal (http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/n1/narwhal-ii.htm)


Narwhal was loaded down with 92 tons of ammunition and stores and a party of ten for her seventh war patrol (23 October-22 November). She was in the Sulu Sea, off Mindanao, the night of 10 November en route to Puluan Bay when two Japanese ships astern opened fire. As star shells burst nearby, the boats four diesel engines " <span class="ev_code_RED">promptly christened "Matthew," "Mark," "Luke," and "John"</span> helped her zig-zag into the darkness and escape her pursuers. Three nights later Narwhal crept into Puluan Bay off Mindoro, and landed two parties of men and 46 tons of supplies on the west beach of the bay. By midnight she was safely on her way to Nasipit, Mindanao. Although the crew received a scare on the 14th when Narwhal went aground on hard sand in the harbor channel where she remained stuck for almost half an hour the boat shook free and then unloaded the rest of her cargo at Nasipit to the tune of "Anchors Aweigh" played by a grateful Filipino band. Embarking 32 evacuees, including 8 women, 2 children, and a baby, the boat sailed for Darwin and the end of her patrol.

kikn79
06-19-2007, 01:51 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
USS Narwhal (http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/n1/narwhal-ii.htm)

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Narwhal was loaded down with 92 tons of ammunition and stores and a party of ten for her seventh war patrol (23 October-22 November). She was in the Sulu Sea, off Mindanao, the night of 10 November en route to Puluan Bay when two Japanese ships astern opened fire. As star shells burst nearby, the boats four diesel engines " <span class="ev_code_RED">promptly christened "Matthew," "Mark," "Luke," and "John"</span> helped her zig-zag into the darkness and escape her pursuers. Three nights later Narwhal crept into Puluan Bay off Mindoro, and landed two parties of men and 46 tons of supplies on the west beach of the bay. By midnight she was safely on her way to Nasipit, Mindanao. Although the crew received a scare on the 14th when Narwhal went aground on hard sand in the harbor channel where she remained stuck for almost half an hour the boat shook free and then unloaded the rest of her cargo at Nasipit to the tune of "Anchors Aweigh" played by a grateful Filipino band. Embarking 32 evacuees, including 8 women, 2 children, and a baby, the boat sailed for Darwin and the end of her patrol.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I'll give you the point for it. The "quiz" I have in front of me says it's Roy Davenport, however, there is no provided documentation along with it.

Good job.
Chuck

wh1skea
06-19-2007, 05:21 PM
Each boat that went on eternal patrol during WW2 is sponsored by a state of the Union. Which state(s) sponsor more than 1 submarine?

kikn79
06-20-2007, 10:45 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
Each boat that went on eternal patrol during WW2 is sponsored by a state of the Union. Which state(s) sponsor more than 1 submarine?

New York and California.

wh1skea
06-20-2007, 11:01 AM
yep

State Assignments for Subs On Eternal Patrol (http://www.subsowespac.org/submarines_lost_in_world_war_2.shtml)

kikn79
06-20-2007, 11:34 AM
2 part question:
What submarine "lost" (not dead lost, an oh S***!! Where did they go lost) sailors during a raiding party on a Japanese fishing boat.

These sailors were later recovered by what submarine?

Chuck

wh1skea
06-20-2007, 01:15 PM
6 Cod sailors were rescued by Blenny....took me a while to find it, and thats bad considering I just read about it last week.

kikn79
06-20-2007, 02:42 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
6 Cod sailors were rescued by Blenny....took me a while to find it, and thats bad considering I just read about it last week.

That is correct!! I loved that story. I wish I could find an account of what the men left onboard the junk went through.

Batter up!!

wh1skea
06-20-2007, 02:56 PM
What submariner is part of the only full admiral father-son team in the USN?

Realjambo
06-20-2007, 03:08 PM
I'll remind you again - please post your sources for the answers of the questions you pose. Thank you.

wh1skea
06-22-2007, 02:51 PM
No takers?

Answer is Adm. John S. McCain, Jr. Son of Adm. McCain Sr. and father of Cpt John S. McCain.

Adm John S. McCain, Jr. (http://www.fleetsubmarine.com/mccainjr.html)

New Question:

Which US sub was the first to be BUILT with the 5/25 deck gun? And for extra credit, which US sub was the first to be fitted with 2 deck guns since the V-boats?

wh1skea
06-25-2007, 06:48 AM
bump

catlegwest
06-26-2007, 11:47 AM
bump

Realjambo
06-26-2007, 04:04 PM
wh1skea you'll have to reveal the answer now. I'm intrigued to learn it too, I searched for it, but it got me beat!

wh1skea
06-26-2007, 08:54 PM
OK, in a rare appearance from the homestead, I'll give you the answers (with source).

1st built with 5"/25 deck gun:
USS Spadefish (SS-411)

1st fitted with dual deck guns since V-boats:
USS Sennet (SS-408), fitted with 2 5"/25 deck guns in January 1945

USN 5"/25 deck gun (http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNUS_5-25_mk10.htm)

wh1skea
06-27-2007, 10:24 AM
What was the 1st US submarine to be sunk by a circular run torpedo?

kikn79
06-27-2007, 11:10 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
What was the 1st US submarine to be sunk by a circular run torpedo?

The USS Tang. Sunk by her last torpedo as it circled around and hit her abreast the aft torpedo room.

wh1skea
06-27-2007, 11:43 AM
Originally posted by kikn79:
The USS Tang. Sunk by her last torpedo as it circled around and hit her abreast the aft torpedo room.

Nope, try again. There was another sub before her.

Scion_Blade
06-27-2007, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by kikn79:
The USS Tang. Sunk by her last torpedo as it circled around and hit her abreast the aft torpedo room.

Nope, try again. There was another sub before her. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Submarine was the USS Tullibee.

I think. I will post my Question once I know Im right.

wh1skea
06-27-2007, 01:01 PM
Yes it was the USS Tullibee
http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq39-1.htm

Realjambo
06-29-2007, 12:41 PM
In Scion's absence I have one. This might just test the grey cells a little.

Tell me who these 3 gentlemen are please!

I'll give you a tip - if you know who one of them is, you may well be able to get all three - Google is your friend! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/quiz.jpg

catlegwest
06-29-2007, 12:57 PM
Adms Nimitz, King, and Spruance

wh1skea
06-29-2007, 02:09 PM
Nimitz I recognized, but catlegwest beat me to it before I could hit google :/

catlegwest
06-29-2007, 02:20 PM
I ALMOST said Nimitz, WAINRIGHT and Spruance, thinking it was taken on board the USS Missouri during the signing of the Japanese Instrument of Surrender (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_Instrument_of_Surrender) but decided not to rush it and do a little more research. This photo was taken on the USS Indianapolis in 1944...

Also, come to think of it, "Wainright's" uniform is all wrong...heh. You guys woulda laughed!

Realjambo
06-29-2007, 02:56 PM
Adms Nimitz, King, and Spruance


Correct!

Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Fleet, (center), with Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas (left) and Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, Commander, Fifth Fleet, (right),on board the Fifth Fleet Flagship, 18 July 1944. Admiral King was then visiting U.S. forces in the newly-captured Marianas.
Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz.

Source: Here (http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/pers-us/uspers-s/r-sprnc.htm)

catlegwest
06-29-2007, 03:43 PM
I'm out the door right now, will have a good question for you by tomorrow, maybe tonight...

catlegwest
06-30-2007, 11:34 AM
What was the two-letter designation the Japanese used for Midway prior to their planned attack, and briefly describe the "ruse" planned by American code breakers to verify this information and help predict the Japanese attack?

Minoos
06-30-2007, 11:57 AM
I recall "objective AF" from the Midway movie.

catlegwest
06-30-2007, 12:00 PM
go on...

Minoos
06-30-2007, 12:57 PM
The first Japanese casualty to American arms
during WW-II is credited to a submarine, which one?

catlegwest
06-30-2007, 03:51 PM
No, I meant go on, you're not finished answering the question...

Minoos
06-30-2007, 04:28 PM
No, I meant go on, you're not finished answering the question...
Ooops http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

So code was verified by sending a false report from Midway. The message reported a failure of Midway's fresh water distillers. The Japanese picked the radio message and reported the failure to their Headquarters using the AF designation.

catlegwest
06-30-2007, 05:03 PM
Originally posted by Minoos:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">No, I meant go on, you're not finished answering the question...
Ooops http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

So code was verified by sending a false report from Midway. The message reported a failure of Midway's fresh water distillers. The Japanese picked the radio message and reported the failure to their Headquarters using the AF designation. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Correct. Midway is a great source of interesting stories.

My sources on this are varied, but for the purposes of citing one source, I referred to the book: World War II: 4,139 Strange and Fascinating Facts (McCombs and Worth) pages 5-6.

Minoos
07-01-2007, 03:26 AM
Thanks catlegwest,

Back to my question:
The first Japanese casualty to American arms
during WW-II is credited to a submarine, which one?

lester_pali1950
07-01-2007, 05:58 AM
actually thye first casualties have been awarded to the uss ward. on dec 7 1941 when it sank a jap mini sub just outside pearl. see the articla below from my records... capt nemo out...

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb122/lester_palifka/1stcasualtiy0001.jpg

catlegwest
07-01-2007, 12:30 PM
Yeah, I thought the Ward drew first blood for the Americans but maybe a sub is credited with an air kill??

Minoos
07-01-2007, 12:56 PM
lester_pali1950 must be correct!
I completely forgot the sinking of this midget sub, so did my source for the question: US Submarine Veterans Inc. in a document dated Jan 2004!

Here's the story of the 1st sub-inflicted casualty:

SS-199 (http://georgetoft.com/tautog/ss199.html)
Two days later -- on Sunday, 7 December -- TAUTOG was at the submarine base, moored at what was then S-6 (pier now removed) when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. Within minutes of the first enemy bomb explosions on Ford Island, TAUTOG's gun crews went into action and, with the help of USS NARWHAL II (SS-167) and a destroyer, splashed a Japanese torpedo plane as it came over Merry Point.

Your turn lester

lester_pali1950
07-02-2007, 02:24 PM
ok i have one for u all.....

on November 19 1943 during "operation galvinic"
a sub was depthcharged by a end escort. during the atack the sub broached and the japs started to really pound her. she was damaged so bad tthe commander decided to surface andf fight it out. a shell from the dd went thru the bridge and one thru the main induction. the commander was killed one of the other officers gave the order to abandon ship. 42 of the boats crew went over the side to be captured by the japs. 12 of the men rode the boat down......the question is.. among those men was one man whos name would become a synonym for "VALOR"
who was that man and what was the name of the sub?

kikn79
07-02-2007, 02:32 PM
Originally posted by lester_pali1950:
ok i have one for u all.....

on November 19 1943 during "operation galvinic"
a sub was depthcharged by a end escort. during the atack the sub broached and the japs started to really pound her. she was damaged so bad tthe commander decided to surface andf fight it out. a shell from the dd went thru the bridge and one thru the main induction. the commander was killed one of the other officers gave the order to abandon ship. 42 of the boats crew went over the side to be captured by the japs. 12 of the men rode the boat down......the question is.. among those men was one man whos name would become a synonym for "VALOR"
who was that man and what was the name of the sub?

The man was John Phillip Cromwell. He won the CMOH and the ship was the USS Sculpin.

Chuck

catlegwest
07-02-2007, 02:34 PM
That's a good one. The sub is the Sculpin and the man's name you are looking for is Captain John P. Cromwell, the wolfpack commander, who went down with the boat for fear of being tortured and divulging the "Ultra" secret (American code-breaking capabilities) and info about Operation Galvanic.

catlegwest
07-02-2007, 02:35 PM
Chuck beat me!!!

kikn79
07-02-2007, 03:36 PM
Originally posted by catlegwest:
Chuck beat me!!!

LOL. Will assume that my answer was correct based on the identical answers..... If not, I apologize...

What was the only Sub vs Sub friendly fire incident reported for US Submarines during WWII?
Bonus points.. What were the 2 submarines involved?

Chuck

lester_pali1950
07-02-2007, 04:36 PM
correct on all accounts... looks like i'm going to have to try a harder one.....capt nemo out

lester_pali1950
07-02-2007, 05:41 PM
ok lets try this one... three part question....

what was the name of the largest japanese combat ship sunk during the war, who was the skiperof the boat that sunk her and what was the name of the boat.....and what was the tonage of the ship sunk...capt nemo out

Realjambo
07-03-2007, 10:10 AM
Bump!

kikn79
07-03-2007, 10:14 AM
Originally posted by lester_pali1950:
ok lets try this one... three part question....

what was the name of the largest japanese combat ship sunk during the war, who was the skiperof the boat that sunk her and what was the name of the boat.....and what was the tonage of the ship sunk...capt nemo out

The USS ARCHERFISH is credited with sinking the IJN Carrier SHINANO which fully loaded was worth 72000 tons. (or 59000 tons by some reports) The captain was Joseph Enright.


Now, back to my question.

What was the only Sub vs Sub friendly fire incident reported for US Submarines during WWII?
Bonus points.. What were the 2 submarines involved?

Realjambo
07-03-2007, 10:27 AM
Only one question should be 'live' at any one point http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

wh1skea
07-03-2007, 11:02 AM
I dont think the scuttling of the USS Darter would count.....It was shelled by submarines Dace and Nautilus.....I'm going to keep searching for any other incidents.

kikn79
07-03-2007, 01:47 PM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
I dont think the scuttling of the USS Darter would count.....It was shelled by submarines Dace and Nautilus.....I'm going to keep searching for any other incidents.

That is not counted as a "friendly fire" incident, I don't believe.

This involves torpedoes being fired on another American submarine. (and hitting, too.)

lester_pali1950
07-03-2007, 02:13 PM
ok sorry i didnt realize that there was only one ? at a time.... wont happen again.... yup archer fish joe enright and shinano... whiich was a yamato class bb converted to a cvn...one of the crew was amamber of my subvets group. ed zalinski. he fired a torp by hand by mistake funny thing was is he got a hit....no set up... ed was also a survivor of thr r12 sinking. only 5 men survived that the 5 on the bridge... anyway i wil definatly have to think of a harder on for next time... capt nemo out....

lester_pali1950
07-04-2007, 05:31 AM
I dont recall any sub vs sub incident in WWII. so i went and did some research> these are sinkings considered freindly fire. uss seawolf: hedge hog attack by the uss Richard m rowell

usss dorado bomed by usa mariner anti sub plane in the carribian.

tullibeee and tang circular run torps.


the only sub vs sub sinkings on report are the uss corvina torpedoed by the I-176 and the kete suspected sunk by ijn submarine.

for questions on sinkings i always use this web site: http://www.submarinebooks.com/SubLosses.htm


roscoes submarine operations in wwII and blairs
silent victory......so based on those references
i can not come up with an answer to your question.....capt nemo out......

Deepbluewolf
07-04-2007, 01:40 PM
well i researched and researched and came to the same conclusion as LESTER.

(OHHH Lester you are right, the ss Corvina 226,my adopted boat was the only one on regiseter as neing sunk by enemy sub)

kikn79
07-04-2007, 09:48 PM
Keep in mind, I didn't say the sub was sunk.....

Reportedly, it's the only sub vs sub frendly fire incident ever in US history.

Chuck

lester_pali1950
07-05-2007, 04:44 AM
ok... but 990.9% of the time if a sub is hit by a torp it will be sunk...unless the torp was a dud....but most likely if the firering sub had a solution it would have been at the center of the boat.....i'd like to know where you found this trivia cuz in all my readings in the last 30 years i havent heard of this incident... this is a good one for the brain... capt nemo out......

kikn79
07-05-2007, 06:38 AM
Originally posted by lester_pali1950:
ok... but 990.9% of the time if a sub is hit by a torp it will be sunk...unless the torp was a dud....but most likely if the firering sub had a solution it would have been at the center of the boat.....i'd like to know where you found this trivia cuz in all my readings in the last 30 years i havent heard of this incident... this is a good one for the brain... capt nemo out......

I'll keep ya guessing for today and post the answer tonight if nobody gets it.

Chuck

Minoos
07-05-2007, 01:27 PM
Were there two subs involved?

lester_pali1950
07-05-2007, 04:17 PM
ok fair enough chuck but htis is a real stumper.......i really dont havve an answer

capt nemo out

kikn79
07-05-2007, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by Minoos:
Were there two subs involved?

Yes. Two subs were involved in the friendly fire incident. One sub fired the torpedoes, one was hit by the torpedoes.

Chuck

catlegwest
07-06-2007, 10:06 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

Deepbluewolf
07-06-2007, 10:24 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/compsmash.gif

I have searched EVERYWHERE....

Realjambo
07-06-2007, 11:59 AM
Time to reveal the answer methinks....

Deepbluewolf
07-06-2007, 12:11 PM
well put Rj, i surfed so much looking for the answer that i had to use my wet suit... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

lester_pali1950
07-06-2007, 02:05 PM
yup time for an answer.... i need to find out ....so i can verify....

OpiesEye
07-06-2007, 02:16 PM
Not the answer but interesting!

http://www.n-base.org.uk/public/report_links/air_sea_accidents.html

kikn79
07-06-2007, 07:21 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Time to reveal the answer methinks....

Ok. Time to end everyone's suspense.....

The two subs involved were the USS Raton and the USS Lapon.


On the 27th of May, 1944, it was a clear dawn in the South China Sea in the Palawan passage. RADM J.W. (Jim) Davis was the skipper of the USS Raton (270) and received an "ultra" message for his eyes only and was to be destroyed after decoding. The message had information that a Japanese Submarine was in route from Singapore to Tokyo with an important German Scientist on board along with some secret materials. The Ratons orders were to intercept and sink. Another submarine, the USS Lapon was also in the area. Subs were assigned area's to patrol and not to overlap each other's area, unless ordered to, thus preventing any sinking of friendlies.

The Executive officer, Pete Sencenbaugh, had the bridge along with three Lookouts. The OOD, Boloslaw Krauze had just gone below to make a quick sweep of the area before we dived. When the sub dived, two of the Lookouts would man the Bow and Stern planes. At 19 minutes before dawn, two explosions occurred after two hard thunks. The Raton shuddered badly and listed a bit. Nobody seemed to have any idea as to what happened as the sub was in 1,000 fathoms of water. The Captain is called to the bridge, a 30 degree course change is made to investigate. All men on watch were told to zip their lips as to this incident. No Japanese sub was sighted or located. The Lapon had fired two torpedo's at the Raton, both hitting in the area of the Safety Tanks, several feet further aft, if they had hit the Ballast Tank, those 'fish' would have penetrated and of course the Raton would have sunk. The Lapon was ready to fire two more torpedoes, when the OOD yelled that he thought this was an American Submarine. During that time of the war, our Navy had bad exploders on some of the fish. Several times in that period, Raton would fire spreads, hear them hit the enemy ships, but no explosions. In this incident, the fish hit, bounced off then exploded. An Angel was riding with the Raton and it's men that morning along with faulty ordnance. Those Angels must have had their hands on those exploders that morning. "Steamie" Stone was skipper of the Lapon and reported that he had fired on the Japanese submarine, had hit the submerged sub, but did not sink it. Of course this was not true, as reported, the Raton was on the surface.

Upon returning to Perth/Freemantle, the Raton was put up on the Marine Railway. Two big dents were in the Safety Tank area's. The crew were instructed to say the sub had hit a mine or tree, both reported, not to have exploded. Even then, everybody was trying to cover their rear ends from any court martial or reprimands. You bet, dents that big caused by a floating palm tree!

This incident was the only time in US Naval History that an American Submarine fired on another American Submarine.

As told by Roy Christensen on this website:

http://adjunct.diodon349.com/Submariners/raton_hit_by_t...m_USS_Lapon_WWII.htm (http://adjunct.diodon349.com/Submariners/raton_hit_by_two_torpedoes_from_USS_Lapon_WWII.htm )

Chuck

catlegwest
07-07-2007, 12:25 AM
What are the rules - I assume Chuck gets another turn?

Realjambo
07-07-2007, 02:17 AM
Rules are on the opening post of the thread on page one... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Just like the SH3 Rolling Quiz, but now the forums have seperated for clarity, here is where you can pose questions and show off your knowledge of all things from the Pacific war theatre and hopefully we can all learn a few things about our favourite subject! Usual rules apply:

1. Only one question 'live' at any one time - and must be related to the Pacific war theatre - and submarines!
2. When setting a question please have a source to back up your answer - be it a book, film, website, DVD or such like
3. Whoever gets the correct answer gets to pose the next question, so where possible, please have a new question to pose
4. Should a new question not be forthcoming from the previous correct forum member, it will be opned up to anyone who has a new question.
5. Questions not answered within 48 hours will be superceded by a new one (Don't worry - the thread will be *bumped* if need be, but the intention is to live up to it's name - 'Rolling Quiz')

Lastly, I encourage the use of photo's and maps etc when posing or answering questions - just makes it more of a visual experience.

All clear? Good! Let's get's learning!

kikn79
07-07-2007, 07:56 AM
Here's my next question..

How many captains made submarine war patrols in WWII? (By captains, I don't mean by rank, I mean by command.)

Chuck

lester_pali1950
07-08-2007, 04:33 AM
this si on the last one... still trying to confirm... i know a sub vet who served on raton. his name is Joe Sabol. i havent talked to him in a few years ... in my conversations with him he never mentioned the incident. i will when i have time call the excutive director of the nautilus musem . he is a long time friend of mine and a former commander of the sub base in new london.. anyway here is the patch that joe gave me

http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb122/lester_palifka/ss270patch0001.jpg

lester_pali1950
07-08-2007, 04:38 AM
here is a patch that was given to me by joe sabol. he was a plank owner on the raton. i dont recall him saying anything about the incident.
i am trying to contact him as he was on all war patrols on the boat. when i get the time i'll call the excutive director of the nautilus
museum he is also a former submariner and former co of the subase prior to retiring. i have known captain adams for years...will have to figure out your next ? chuck.... capt nemo out.

lester_pali1950
07-08-2007, 04:59 AM
ok chuck good job... i found a site on raton and in joes own words he described the incident... answer confirmed...

Heroes. It was contributed by Joe Sabol GM1(SS) 1943-1945.
Joe Sabol shook my hand vigorously and ushered me into his "submarine gallery", a spare bedroom in his house. There he had on display plaques he had made with submarine insignias, books on submarines and naval history and other memorabilia of his twenty-three years as a submariner. He's active in his veterans' group and travels each year to Kings Bay, Georgia and other ports to ride on submarines and visit with Navy pals. "Submarine Joe" doesn't lack for stories, which he tells with his wry sense of humor. He relates the incident that made him decide to enlist in the Navy.
"I was working in the Baltimore shipyards in October of 1942 where we were building the Liberty cargo ships. One day I saw a destroyer come in with a huge hole and the bow almost torn off and that just kicked me into being patriotic. I went on a drinking binge and I must have enlisted somewhere along the way because two days later I found myself sitting on a curb with a tattoo that said "Mother" and a set of orders to go to boot camp!"
What made him go out for submarine duty?
"Well, as I was nearing the end of boot camp, they gave me a choice of either to be a coxswain )a driver of a landing ship that goes ashore) or go to submarine school. I didn't feel like driving a boatload of soldiers onto a beach. That was not my bag. So I ended up in submarine school and I was happy I did."
Joe went to New London, Connecticut for subbmarine training, along with a special sonar school and gunnery school. One of the skills they had to learn involved swimming through an escape tower.
"We had to go through a one hundred foot escape trunk from a depth of a hundred feet to prove that we could ascend from that depth. It entails you going to the bottom of the tank and entering a pressurized chamber. We had no scuba gear, just a Monsson Lung. You would put the lung on, put your mouth around it, and then inhale and exhale into the lung as you made your ascent up a rope. If you got into trouble they had divers at the various levels to help you. It was a very important part of our training because if you were on the bottom you had to be able to escape from the submarine if you needed to."
"Once we got through that training I was assigned to "new construction" on the USS Raton, SS-270, a submarine being built in Manitowac, Wisconsin. We had to learn every part of the submarine as it was being built, every system and every valve. It was called "school of the boat." We were there for three months. Then we took the sub through the Chicago Canal to Rockport where they had a tug with a dry dock. The sub was put into the dry dock. Then we went down the Mississippi River in this dry dock because a sub draws seventeen to twenty feet of water and the dry dock put us up above the surface. After that we made our way to Algiers, a Navy base in New Orleans, where we took on ammunition and got ready to go to war/"
"From there, we made a couple of training trips back and forth through the Panama Canal. Later, we took on torpedoes and went to the Galapagos Islands where we learned to fire them."
It didn't take long for Joe and his crew to see action.
"We were enroute to Brisbane, Austrailia when one of the lookouts spotted two torpedoes fired at us. We managed to go down the middle between the two of them."
Joe relates a humorous incident in Brisbane that reinforces the reputation sailors have for being hard drinkers.
"I had a topside watch one night. I was armed with a gun at the gangway and one of the Chief Petty Officers came back about two o'clock in the morning with a real live cow. Obviously, he was nightclubbing and had brought the cow back with the intention of getting us fresh milk. We never got the chance to milk it because the owner came looking for the cow and he was pretty upset!"
One of Joe's projects that he's especially proud of is a map on which he has marked the tracks of the eight patrols he was on during the war. They show meticulous detail, pinpointing the latitude and longitude at various places where events occurred and the results of each patrol. It took him months of research through naval records to compile these maps. Two of the eight patrols were unsuccessful in that no enemy ships were sunk. In all, the Raton sunk twenty-one Japanese vessels.
"During our fourth patrol the USS Lapon, another sub, mistook us for an enemy submarine and fired two torpedoes at us. We were chasing a Japanese submarine and told the Lapon that we were coming into their area, but we mistakenly went an hour ahead. We were going into a different time zone and didn't turn our clocks back. One of the torpedoes went off prematurely and one bounced right off the side of our sub and didn't go off. When we came in from the patrol and were put into dry dock you could see the glancing blow on the hull."
Joe relates another case of "friendly fire."
"We were near Balakapapan , the largest oil field in Borneo, and one of our bombers from New Guinea was hading there. He came down very low and prematurely dropped a string of bobmbs ahead of us. We were on the surface and couldn't dive because it was too shallow. Our skipper bot on the radio with whoever was leading them and raised all kinds of heck with the squadron leader/

catlegwest
07-08-2007, 03:14 PM
Good job, Lester, that's very interesting.

lester_pali1950
07-09-2007, 03:23 AM
ok chuck the answer to your last question is 465 skippers.......see below for the rest of the facts.......capt nemo out


During the 1,347 days of WWII, 465 skippers took 263 boats and 16,000 men out on 1736 patrols, collectively spending 79,838 days at sea, of which 31,571 days were spent in operating areas where they attacked 4,114 merchant ships, firing 14,748 torpedoes and sinking 1,178 of them along with 214 Naval vessels. Of these 263 boats 52 and 3,617 men never returned. In this same period, the Germans lost 781 U-boats, the Japanese lost 130 and the Italians lost 85. 16,200 Japanese merchant seamen were killed and 53,400 wounded out of the total force of 122,000 by United States submarines. A force of 2% of the U.S. Navy accounted for 55% of Japan's maritime losses.

Never in the annals of military history has there been a record of achievement to equal that of the United States Submarine Service during World War Two. With 1.6 percent of all Naval personnel the Submarine Service sank over fifty-five percent of all Japanese ships sunk, including one third of all Japanese Men-of-War.

They also performed many other tasks such as carrying ammunition to Corregidor, evacuating the Philippine Government and all it's gold. Attacking enemy land positions, landing spotters and raiders on many islands. Rescuing downed US pilots, one of which was George Bush, later President of the United States.



Secret surveillance was another mission of US submarines. US submarines scouted every landing made during the war in the Pacific and on many occasions acted as 'point' for the invading forces guiding them to the invasion place.

The United States Submarine service had the Island of Japan isolated long before the end of the war. They were unable to supply their army in the field, or even sustain the economy of the home islands. It is questionable under those circumstances that the atomic bomb was really needed.

All of this was done under the strictest secrecy, most of it not revealed for more than forty years after the end of World War Two.

kikn79
07-09-2007, 07:22 AM
Originally posted by lester_pali1950:
ok chuck the answer to your last question is 465 skippers.......see below for the rest of the facts.......capt nemo out


During the 1,347 days of WWII, 465 skippers took 263 boats and 16,000 men out on 1736 patrols, collectively spending 79,838 days at sea, of which 31,571 days were spent in operating areas where they attacked 4,114 merchant ships, firing 14,748 torpedoes and sinking 1,178 of them along with 214 Naval vessels. Of these 263 boats 52 and 3,617 men never returned. In this same period, the Germans lost 781 U-boats, the Japanese lost 130 and the Italians lost 85. 16,200 Japanese merchant seamen were killed and 53,400 wounded out of the total force of 122,000 by United States submarines. A force of 2% of the U.S. Navy accounted for 55% of Japan's maritime losses.

Never in the annals of military history has there been a record of achievement to equal that of the United States Submarine Service during World War Two. With 1.6 percent of all Naval personnel the Submarine Service sank over fifty-five percent of all Japanese ships sunk, including one third of all Japanese Men-of-War.

They also performed many other tasks such as carrying ammunition to Corregidor, evacuating the Philippine Government and all it's gold. Attacking enemy land positions, landing spotters and raiders on many islands. Rescuing downed US pilots, one of which was George Bush, later President of the United States.



Secret surveillance was another mission of US submarines. US submarines scouted every landing made during the war in the Pacific and on many occasions acted as 'point' for the invading forces guiding them to the invasion place.

The United States Submarine service had the Island of Japan isolated long before the end of the war. They were unable to supply their army in the field, or even sustain the economy of the home islands. It is questionable under those circumstances that the atomic bomb was really needed.

All of this was done under the strictest secrecy, most of it not revealed for more than forty years after the end of World War Two.

Good job Lester, I have 466 but I'll give you the point, anyway. : )

They are:
Mannert L. Abele
Ernest P. Abrahamson
Frank C. Acker
Edward Ackerman
Benjamin E. Adams, Jr.
James A. Adkins
Augustus H. Alston, Jr.
Stephen H. Ambruster
William L. Anderson
Charles H. Andrews
Richard S. Andrews
James H. Ashley, Jr.
Marshall H. Austin
Theodore C. Aylward
John B. Azer
Barton E. Bacon, Jr.
Donald G. Baer
Oliver W. Bagby
Harold E. Baker
Alan B. Banister
Stephen C. Barchet
Eric L. Barr, Jr.
Frank L. Barrows
Thomas S. Baskett
Raymond H. Bass
John F. Bauer
Edward L. Beach
Albert L. Becker
David B. Bell
Carter L. Bennett
Roy S. Benson
Raymond Berthrong
H. Bissell, Jr.
Edward N. Blakely
James W. Blanchard
Edward C. Blonts, Jr.
John A. Bogley
John A. Bole, Jr.
Robert A. Bonin
Albert M. Bontier
Joseph H. Bourland
John M. Bowers
Francis D. Boyle
Charles F. Brindupke
Robert M. Brinker
John C. Broach
William H. Brockman
Charles D. Brown
Francis E. Brown
George H. Brown
Henry C. Bruton
Romondt Budd
Creed C. Burlingame
John L. Burnside, Jr.
Albert C. Burrows
William J. Bush
Ovid M. Butler
Robert B. Byrnes
Robert H. Caldwell, Jr.
Joseph A. Callaghan
Gordon Campbell
James H. Campbell
Freeland H. Carde, Jr.
Edward S. Carmick
Bruce L. Carr
Hiram Cassedy
Lucius H. Chappell
Wreford G. Chapple
Waldeman N. Christensen
Bladen D. Claggett
Bernard A. Clarey
Albert H. Clark
Charles R. Clark, Jr.
James S. Clark
Merrill K. Clementson
Robert H. Close
James W. "Red" Coe
Cyrus C. Cole
Otis R. Cole
Frank J. Coulter
Fred Connaway
David R. Connole
John Corbus
John S. Coye
John R. Craig
Richard H. Crane
Earl R. Crawford
John D. Crowley
Slade D. Cutter
Thomas B. Dabney
Lawrence R. Daspit
Roy M. Davenport
John F. Davidson
James W. Davis
Samuel D. Dealey
Marion Ramirez DaArellano
James C. Dempsey
William N. Deragon
John L. DeTar
Edward F. Dissette
Harry B. Dodge
Glynn R. Donoho
Robert E. Dornin
Anthony H. Dropp
Melvin H. Dry
Claren E. Duke
Harold E. Duryea
Carl R. Dwyer
Thomas M. ****rs
Otis J. Earle
Walter G. Ebert
Frank M. Eddy
Ian C. Eddy
Lawrence L. Edge
Joseph F. Enright
Edward J. Fahey
L.C. Farley, Jr.
Richard M. Farrell
Allen R. Faust
Frank W. Fenno
William E. Ferrall
Maurice Ferrara
William L. Fey, Jr.
Saverio Filippone
John A. Fitzgerald
Joseph P. Fitz-Patrick
John J. Flachsenhar
Eugene B. Fluckey
Robert J. Foley
John J. Foote
George W. Forbes, Jr.
Ernest S. Frederick
Charles L. Freeman
James D. Fulp, Jr.
Albert S. Furman
John K. Fyfe
Norman D. Gage
Ignatius J. Galantin
Anton R. Gallaher
Francis M. Gambacorta
Bricker M. Ganyard
Philip W. Garnett
Malcolm E. Garrison
William J. Germershausen
John D. Gerwick
Robert C. Gillette
Howard W. Gilmore
Stephen H. Gimber
James G. Glaes
Paul E. Glenn
James B. Grady
James D. Grant
Francis R. Greenup
Harry H. Greer, Jr.
Richard V. Gregory
Elton W. Grenfell
George W. Grider
Walter T. Griffith
Royce L. Gross
Paul H. Grouleff
William P. Gruner
Guy F. Gugliotta
Frederick A. Gun
Oscar E. Hagberg
John L. Haines
Warren C. Hull, Jr.
Mason J. Hamilton
Douglas T. Hammond
Edward R. Hannon
James T. Hardin
Frederick J. Harlfinger
Talbot E. Harper
Brooks J. Harral
Irvin S. Hartman
Enrique D. Haskin
Earle C. Hawk
Frank E. Haylor
William H. Hazzard
Charles M. Henderson
Thomas H. Henry
Karl G. Hensel
Franklin G. Hess
John B. Hess
James M. Hicks
Blish C. Hills
Gerald G. Hinman
Thomas W. Hogan
Richard Holden
George M. Holley, Jr.
John C. Hollingsworth
William G. Holman
Edward R. Holt, Jr.
Arnold H. Holtz
F.P. Hoskins
Martin P. Hottel
Arthur C. House, Jr.
Harry Hull
Jesse L. Hull
J.L. Hunnicutt
Kenneth C. Hurd
Adrian M. Hurst
David A. Hurt
Edward S. Hutchinson
John M. Hyde
Earl T. Hydeman
Joseph B. Icenhower
William D. Irvin
Donald G. Irvine
Tyrell D. Jacobs
Frederick E. Janney
Benjamin C. Jarvis
Marvin J. Jensen
Carl A. Johnson
Raymond W. Johnson
Stephen Johnson
James L.Jordan
Allen R. Joyce
Herbert L. Jukes
Lawrence V. Juhlin
Robert A. Keating, Jr.
Thomas D. Keegan
Russell Kefauver
George W. Kehl
Roger M. Keithly
Marvin G. Kennedy
Manning M. Kimmel
Robert D. King
William T. Kinsella
Oliver G. Kirk
Charles C. Kirkpatrick
William L. Kitch
Thomas B. Klakring
Roy C. Klinker
Harman J. Kossler
Arthur E. Krapf
Frederick W. Laing
George H. Laird, Jr.
Leonce A. Lajaunie, Jr.
Richard C. Lake
Raymond S. Lamb
Robert B. Lander
Richard C. Latham
Frank D. Latta
Henry C. Lauerman
Willard R. Laughon
George W. Lautrup
William H. Lawrence
John E. Lee
William R. Lefavour
Charles F. Leigh
Willis A. Lent
Bafford E. Lewellen
George A. Lewis
H.H. Lewis
Jack H. Lewis
Ralph H. Lockwood
Sam C. Loomis, Jr.
Charles E. Loughlin
Vernon L. Lowrance
Frederick C. Lucas, Jr.
Nicholas Lucker, Jr.
Frank C. Lynch, Jr.
Ralph C. Lynch, Jr.
Richard B. Lynch
Richard B. Lynch
Hyland B. Lyon
Morton H. Lytle
Edgar J. MacGregor
George K. MacKenzie, Jr.
Duncan C. MacMillan
John R. Madison
Edward P. Madley
Robert R. Manahgan
Stephen S. Mann, Jr.
Elliot E. Marshall
John C. Martin
John H. Maurer
John S. McCain, Jr.
Charles D. McCall
James L. McCallum
David H. McClintock
Victor B. McCrea
Woodrow W. McCrory
Lucien B. McDonald
Charles F. McGivern
Donald McGregor
Louis D. McGregor, Jr.
Rob Roy McGregor
Eugene B. McKinney
John R. McKnight
Bernard F. McMahon
Fitzhugh McMaster
Donald L. Mehlop
Wayne R. Merrill
Ralph M. Metcalf
Leonard S. Mewhinney
Willard D. Michael
John R. Middleton, Jr.
Charles K. Miller
Herman E. Miller
William J. Millican
Peter G. Molteni, Jr.
George G. Molumphy
Henry S. Monroe
Keats E. Montross
John A. Moore
John R. Moore
Raymond J. Moore
Dudley W. "Mush" Morton
Stanley P. Moseley
Morton C. Mumma, Jr
Henry G. Munson
Charlton L. Murphy, Jr.
John W. Murphy, Jr.
William G. Myers
Charles D. Nace
Harley K. Nauman
William T. Nelson
William A. New
James H. Newsome
Nicholas J. Nicholas
John C. Nichols
Richard E. Nichols
Stanley G. Nichols
Richard P. Nicholson
Chester W. Nimitz, Jr.
Byron H. Nowell
Thomas B. Oakley, Jr.
Richard H. O'Kane
Eliot Olsen
Robert I. Olsen
Guy E. O'Neil
William A. Overton
Robie E. Palmer
William B. Parham
Frank M. Parker
Lewis S. Parks
William B. Perkins, Jr.
Richard W. Peterson
Herman A. Pieczentkowski
George E. Pierce
John R. Pierce
George E. Porter, Jr.
William S. Post, Jr.
Roland F. Pryce
Douglas H. Pugh
Charles F. Putman
Philip D. Quirk
Albert Raborn
Conde L. Raguet
Gordon B. Rainer
Lawson P. Ramage
A.L. Redon
John W. Reed
Mile P. Refo III
Eli T. Reich
James R. Reynolds
Cassius D. Rhymes
Robert H. Rice
Hugh R. Rimmer
Maurice H. Rindskopf
Robert D. Risser
John P. Roach
Orme C. Robbins
Roderick S. Rooney
Philip H. Ross
Harold E. Ruble
Frederick Russell
Michael P. Russillo
Royal L. Rutter
Eugene T. Sands
Willard A. Saunders
Francis W. Scanland, Jr.
Arnold F. Schade
Donald A. Scherer
John H. Schmidt
Maximilian G. Schmidt
Allan G. Schnable
Walter P. Schoeni
Vincent E. Schumacher
Walter F. Schlech, Jr.
John A. Scott
Frank G. Selby
Robert F. Sellars
Jack M. Seymour
Frank N. Shamer
Louis Shane, Jr.
George A. Sharp
Maurice W. Shea
Edward E. Shelby
Evan T. Shepard
William B. Sieglaff
George S. Simmons III
H.S. Simpson
Vincent A. Sisler, Jr.
Walter L. Small
Arthur C. Smith
Chester C. Smith
Frank M. Smith
William R. Smith, Jr.
Edward D. Spruance
Augustus R. St. Angelo
Joseph J. Staley
Edward F. Steffanides, Jr.
Everett H. Steinmetz
Edward C. Stephan
Clyde B. Stevens, Jr.
James E. Stevens
Harry C. Stevenson
William A. Stevenson
Paul C. Stimson
Hamilton L. Stone
Lowell T. Stone
Howard F. Stoner
William S. Stovall, Jr.
George L. Street III
Albert R. Strow
Henry D. Sturr
Ralph E. Styles
Paul E. Summers
Arthur H. Taylor
William B. Thomas
Willis M. Thomas
William C. Thompson, Jr.
Carl Tiedeman
Jack C. Titus
Charles O. Triebel
John H. Turner
Vernon C. Turner
Alexander K. Tyree
John A. Tyree
Gordon W. Underwood
Paul Van Leunen, Jr.
Richard G. Voge
Frederick H. Wahlig
George H. Wales
Francis D. Walker, Jr.
William W. Walker
Lewis Wallace
John F. Walling
Norvell G. Ward
Robert E.M. Ward
Frederick B. Warder
John R. Waterman
Frank T. Watkins
Nelson P. Watkins
Richard A. Waugh
Donald F. Weiss
Edwin M. Westbrook, Jr.
Karl R. Wheland
David L. Whelchel
Reuben T. Whitaker
David C. White
Charles W. Wilkins
Joseph W. Wilkins, Jr.
Robert R. Williams, Jr.
Delbert F. Williamson
Thomas F. Williamson
Joseph H. Willingham
Thomas L. Wogan
Robert K. Worthington
William H. Wright
William L. Wright
William N. Wylie
Lloyd V. Young
David Zabriskie, Jr.

catlegwest
07-09-2007, 08:23 AM
Wow, good work, gentlemen. I kinda thought that was a boring question but I stand corrected. Good posts you two. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I wish that the few folks who are vocal about being disappointed in SH4 being a Pacific game and not (the third in a row) Atlantic game would read Lester's post. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif Some poor, ignorant soul recently went so far as to call the Atlantic the only 'real' submarine theater. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Your turn, Lester!

lester_pali1950
07-09-2007, 10:19 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gifthanks chuck for the point. and yes catlegwest this did seem to be a boring question but when you look at some of the facts uncovered it is interesting... i hopethe guys that think the atlantic was the best really should look at the pacific more closley. yes the german suffered great losses (40,000 plus men) and maybe they had a greater selection of subs than we did. (type 7 type xx1 seehund, mulch, niger etc etc) and they did sink alot of ships but they can not compare to our guys in the pacific.....anyway i guess im just byest in my opinion as i have known so many of the sub vets from wwII. and being an honarary crew member of the Lionfish SS298... they really shouldnt be dissapoiunted thathtis is a pacific game... once they start to learn about some of the history i think that they will come around.

well i guess ill have to go home and think of a good one.. im at work right now (lunch)....capt nemo out.

lester_pali1950
07-09-2007, 02:58 PM
ok group here we go new question:

starting in 1942 thru 1945 out of all the ship yards that built submarines (mare island,manitowoc,cramp,electric boat and portsmouth)which yard produced the most submarines? also by year how many went down the ways........good luck and happy researching......capt nemo out...

wh1skea
07-10-2007, 06:13 AM
Electric Boat Co, Groton, CT. 1942 - 17, 1943 - 24, 1944 - 23, 1945 - 11.

lester_pali1950
07-10-2007, 10:08 AM
correct.....your turn to put one up....capt nemo out.

wh1skea
07-10-2007, 10:30 AM
ok, who skippered the most US boats during the war? And what boats was he skipper?

lester_pali1950
07-10-2007, 04:18 PM
ok the one that i found was cdr john corbus. he was skipper on bowfin, s24, herring, haddo total of four subs....capt nemo out

wh1skea
07-10-2007, 05:42 PM
Right. My source was FleetSubmarine.com.

lester_pali1950
07-11-2007, 03:11 AM
ok heres one: in what year during the war which submarine accomplished what no other naval vessal in history had done? and who was the commanding officer?

wh1skea
07-11-2007, 05:53 AM
in 1945 USS Barb, under command of CMDR Eugene Fluckey, sank a train. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

catlegwest
07-11-2007, 06:29 AM
I thought of that but it was just a little commando raid, surely not a first.

lester_pali1950
07-11-2007, 10:11 AM
Not correct----this happened mid war sometime and you need to think bigger.....capt nemo out

wh1skea
07-12-2007, 10:21 AM
Originally posted by lester_pali1950:
Ok.... the answer is the USS Sealion II snak the japanese battlship kongo unassited which has never been done in us navy history. below is hte descrition of the action which i got from the uss sealion web site......



capt. nemo out



A few minutes after midnight on 21 November the SEA LION was cruising on the surface nosing into Formosa Straits, through whose protective confines all Japanese shipping funneled. The sea was calm and there was no moon, for the sky was overcast. All hands on the bridge were staring hard into the night. Suddenly the radar screen flicked bright with three pips at extreme range so the targets had to be unusually large to show. Commander REICH promptly headed the submarine toward the targets. As the distance closed, more pips showed up, now indicating four large ships in columns screened by three others. The two middle ships were of battleship proportions, the other two would be cruisers, and the screening ships destroyers.

It was a dark night, and the column was moving fast. The task force felt secure from attack due to its position and high speed, and was not zigging. So Commander REICH made the unusual decision to ambush the warships from the surface. At 0146 the SEA LION was on the enemy's starboard beam, slowly gaining. As she bent on all speed to get ahead, a night wind entered the approach problem and she had to claw her way through rising seas. An hour later the submarine was out in front, and the second ship in column, the nearest battleship, was selected for the target. As she maneuvered into attack position, the leading cruiser went by. Then an escorting destroyer threatened to intervene. This silhouette, dimly seen from the bridge, was the first visible contact with the enemy task force, until that moment the chase had been conducted entirely by radar. Fearing the destroyer might overlap the battleship in line of fire, the torpedoes were set for a lower depth. At 0256, as the destroyer passed the lurking submarine, six torpedoes plunged toward the first battleship, leaving not so much as a single bubble in their wakes. As the last shot left the tube nest, the rudder was thrown hard right and the three stern torpedoes were fired at the second battleship. Sixty seconds later several explosions blossomed brightly crimson -in the night --- three on the first ship, one on the second, but that was all. They might have been fireworks for all the effect on the Japanese formation.

The SEA LION ran westward at flank speed while the Jap destroyers charged eastward in pursuit of ghosts. By 0310 the SEA LION was 8.000 yards west of the Jap task force, and she slowed to parallel the enemy's course and rush a torpedo load. The warships were doing 18 knots, and apparently the hits had only dented the armor belt on the battleships. Another attack was necessary. By this time the sea had begun to build up, and solid water was breaking over the bridge of the submarine. She put on maximum speed to overhaul the fleeing task force, and held on until sparking commutators on the motors compiled her to slow down to full speed. At this pace the SEA LION could do about 17 knots. An hour passed, and a second one. Suddenly the first battleship veered out of formation and began to slow down. Two destroyers dropped back to screen her.

By 0512 the SEA LION was in attack position. : She slowed and turned in for the attack but it was not necessary as there was a tremendous explosion; a flash of light; then again total darkness. So perished the veteran battleship KONGO. She was the first and only battleship sunk by a submarine during the Pacific War, and her loss struck a severe blow to the Japanese Navy.
I completely over looked that event....But I did ask pretty much the same question a few weeks ago. Only difference was that I mentioned Sealion in the question. :shrugs:

lester_pali1950
07-12-2007, 02:03 PM
mentioned Sealion in the question. :shrugs:[/QUOTE]

sorry i wasnt that active in this forum two weeks ago and i didnt read every page to see what was asked in the past....so please forgive me for asking almost the same question as you did......capt nemo out....

catlegwest
07-12-2007, 02:05 PM
That's no problem, lester - who's turn is it, RJ?

Realjambo
07-12-2007, 02:11 PM
That's no problem, lester - who's turn is it, RJ?

Gosh, do you know, I've lost track - a very busy day today! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It's open, whoever has a question, shoot.

Deepbluewolf
07-12-2007, 02:21 PM
OK i have a question:

How many I-400 or Sen Toku where in actual combat?

Realjambo
07-12-2007, 02:28 PM
I know, but will sit back for this one.

Deepbluewolf
07-12-2007, 02:51 PM
hmmmm...i'm afraid i have to whitdraw the question.

Its murky waters...there are conflicting reports of at least a war ship sunk by I-400, and as the offical war records of the japanese navy were destroyed it impossible to verify the accuracy of those reports.

instead idd like to ask what was the fastest sub built for WWII.

wh1skea
07-13-2007, 06:20 AM
Fastest ones I've found were the Japanese type A1, B1, B2, C1, and C2 @ 23.5 knots.

Japanese Submarines (http://www.combinedfleet.com/ss.htm)

Deepbluewolf
07-15-2007, 09:24 AM
Originally posted by wh1skea:
Fastest ones I've found were the Japanese type A1, B1, B2, C1, and C2 @ 23.5 knots.

Japanese Submarines (http://www.combinedfleet.com/ss.htm)

WELL this is the right answer...

also recomend the article http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

"Because of the vastness of the Pacific, Japan built many boats of extreme range and size, many of which were capable of cruises exceeding 20,000 miles and lasting more than 100 days. In fact, Japan built what were by far the largest submarines in the world, indeed, the only submarines over 5,000 tons submerged displacement, or submarines over 400 feet in length until the advent of nuclear power. These same boats were credited with a range of 37,500 miles at 14 knots, a figure never matched by any other diesel-electric submarine. These large boats could each carry three floatplane bombers, the only submarines in history so capable. Japan built 41 submarines that could carry one or more aircraft, while the vast submarine fleets of the United States, Britain, and Germany included not one submarine so capable.

During the Second World War, there were 56 submarines larger than 3,000 tons in the entire world, and 52 of these were Japanese. Japan built 65 submarines with ranges exceeding 20,000 miles at ten knots, while the Allies had no submarine capable of this feat. By 1945, Japan had built all 39 of the world's diesel-electric submarines with more than 10,000 horsepower, and all 57 of the world's diesel-electric submarines capable of 23+ knots surface speed.

The Japanese navy also built submarines with the fastest underwater speeds of any nation's combat submarines. They employed 78 midget submarines capable of 18.5 to 19 knots submerged, and built 110 others capable of 16 knots. As the war was ending they completed four medium-sized submarines capable of 19 knots submerged. This exceeds the 17.5-knot performance of the famed German Type XXI coming into service at the same time. As early as 1938, Japan completed the experimental Submarine Number 71, capable of more than 21 knots submerged. "

wh1skea
07-16-2007, 04:59 AM
I'll have a question later today http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

kikn79
07-17-2007, 06:45 AM
Bump

mariuszj1939
07-17-2007, 06:49 AM
Originally posted by kikn79:
Bump

May I post the question or ?

Realjambo
07-17-2007, 07:39 AM
May I post the question or ?


In the absence of wh1skea then by all means Mariuszj, please do http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

mariuszj1939
07-17-2007, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">May I post the question or ?


In the absence of wh1skea then by all means Mariuszj, please do http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks RJ,

I feel it's not so difficult.

8th June 1944 - biggest British submarine success in WWII near Sumatra (Japanese victim).

Questions :
- please tell name of submarine ?
- what was sunk + what was carried inside ?

(FYG - will be back on forum after half a day therefore be patient please http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif)