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View Full Version : OT-An interview with YAK 9 pilot: part one



IDF_Raam
06-07-2006, 03:49 PM
As I wrote in a previous post, we interviewed a yak 9 pilot. The session was short €" one hour, and since we needed a translator the net time was even shorter. We got interesting info though, and we plan to have another session very soon, showing him the sim (including a mission we made based on his story) and asking many more questions.
You are welcome to read part 1 in our forum
http://members.lycos.co.uk/idfsquadron/

p1ngu666
06-07-2006, 04:27 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Vipez-
06-07-2006, 08:33 PM
Just to save people's time:

http://members.lycos.co.uk/idfsquadron/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=768

Friendly_flyer
06-07-2006, 11:36 PM
Thanks for posting the interview! Him being a flight instructor really makes him very a very interesting interview subject. I hope you manage to get more interviews with him!

woofiedog
06-07-2006, 11:54 PM
Thank's for posting this interveiw... Excellent job and some Very Good quesions.

Again Thank's

lowfighter
06-08-2006, 02:55 AM
Thank you!

rnzoli
06-08-2006, 02:56 AM
* scratches head when looking at the thread title and mumbles to himself *

(why OT? this subject is right on topic)

.. and its very nicely done, congratulations for you guys http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

ytareh
06-08-2006, 05:04 AM
Pure Gold!

Ratsack
06-08-2006, 07:23 AM
I€m staggered.

I can€t believe that an air force would use green pilots with no combat experience as instructors. I can€t express my dismay. If this was not just an isolated incident, it goes a long way to explaining why the Jagdwaffe€s experten racked up such astronomical totals of kills.

My thinking here is that it is just not enough to be able to fly O.K. There are a whole raft of intangibles in any form of combat, but particularly so in air combat, that either have to be learned on the job or through hundreds of hours of practice. I don€t believe that green pilots with no combat experience €" however skilled they may be as flyers €" would be likely to understand how to conserve and use energy, how to use a rolling scissors, or how to rope a dope without having actually seen somebody do it. Unfortunately for these young Soviet pilots, if the first person they saw actually doing these things happened to be German, they weren€t likely to live long enough to learn from the experience, if you see what I mean.

Thanks for taking the time to speak with this guy and record the interview.

cheers,
Ratsack

Dtools4fools
06-08-2006, 07:36 AM
Another thing I found rather shocking is that even by 44 only TWO out of the 9 planes had two way receivers...

Wow, how can you warn your buddies if they got an enemy plane at their 6?

*****

rnzoli
06-08-2006, 08:22 AM
Wow, how can you warn your buddies if they got an enemy plane at their 6?

Well, this is a story that has happened between a German flight and a Hungarian fligh of Bf-109s, attacked by Mustangs from the Sun.

The Hungarian pilots had to fire tracers in front of the German planes to warn them about the attack from behind.

Maybe similar rules applied within the flights, but for one-way radio planes?

IDF_Raam
06-08-2006, 09:37 AM
I think that in a war of such a magnitude, that lasted so many years, and resurces were limited, it is cairtenly possible. So you devide your equipment as wisely as you can.
I hope to ask him more about this subject next meeting.

gprr
06-08-2006, 09:57 AM
Hi friends

Thanks for your parses and comments.
The radio question was presented to €œA€ by my squad mate eli201 because he had some knowledge about the Russians flying combat sorties even without any onboard radio at all.

Thanks on behalf of IDF squad.
gprr

horseback
06-08-2006, 05:38 PM
Re: the difficulty of radio communications.

Modern radios are far more capable than the radios of the WWII era. For all intents and purposes, radio voice comms between aircraft, and between aircraft and ground units was a very new phenomenon in the late thirties-early forties. The war itself did much to advance the technology.

Quite often, especially in the early war, radios were single frequency units. That meant that your Receiver/Transmitter was capable of sending and receiving just the one frequency, and that meant everyone was on that frequency (with the ensuing confusion due to poor radio discipline and so on). Most radios were capable of a few different frequencies, but the 'crystal' had to be changed to achieve this. Frequency was changed on the ground by your ground crew before a mission with a common frequency predetermined. This usually meant that a flight or squadron in the technologically 'advanced' air forces would have a flight or squadron leader with two radios (for ground control and the squadron frequencies) and the rest of the flight or squadron would carry just the one for inter-aircraft comms. Comms between units like bombers and escorts could be problemmatic if the appropriate frequency was not known or properly set on one of the parties involved.

Only later in the war were some radios built that had the ability to switch between frequencies from the cockpit.

Radios were originally quite bulky, heavy and demanded a great deal of your electrical power. Until some time well into the war, the pilots had to use a hand held microphone or a less reliable type mounted in the oxygen mask (prone to freezing up at higher alts due to the moisture in his breath). Better mikes for masks and throat collars came as the war went on, but it took time for the need to be recognized and met.

Add in the expense of each unit for a cash-strapped country like the Soviet Union, and radios must have seemed like an extravagence to those holding the purse strings, especially considering that they weren't up in the sky fighting for their lives and unable to communicate with those who might help them...

cheers

horseback

jimDG
06-08-2006, 07:02 PM
If I may add - all P-39s had very good radios - this is one of the reason they were prefered as airplanes over soviet types.

WTE_Galway
06-08-2006, 08:51 PM
bear in mind technology was at a level where a lot of WWII bombers had SEXTANTS built in for night navigation and morse code was still in extensive use

the transceivers in question where valve technology, had limited range and, as pointed out above, the frequency was often locked in by the choice of crystal plugged into the unit

PBNA-Boosher
06-08-2006, 09:42 PM
Cool beans!

Kernow
06-09-2006, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by Ratsack:
I€m staggered.

I can€t believe that an air force would use green pilots with no combat experience as instructors. I can€t express my dismay.

Actually it would depend on the stage of flying training being taught. Someone being taught the basics on a biplane trainer doesn't need a combat veteran as an instructor. Tactics on the other hand...

Ratsack
06-09-2006, 10:01 PM
Originally posted by Kernow:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Ratsack:
I€m staggered.

I can€t believe that an air force would use green pilots with no combat experience as instructors. I can€t express my dismay.

Actually it would depend on the stage of flying training being taught. Someone being taught the basics on a biplane trainer doesn't need a combat veteran as an instructor. Tactics on the other hand... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep, fair point. I was just so surprised at the idea of using students as instructors that I didn't think of that.

cheers.
Ratsack

tHeBaLrOgRoCkS
06-10-2006, 04:41 PM
A very interesting read, and I hope you do get more oppertunities to interview this pilot. Many thanks both to you and especialy to him for sharing his memories http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

LEXX_Luthor
06-10-2006, 07:23 PM
RatSack::
Yep, fair point. I was just so surprised at the idea of using students as instructors that I didn't think of that.
That's part of our FAA system today here in Ussia. Commercial/instrument students volunteer to teach basic private pilot lisence lessons and build flying hours toward their professional career.