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Esel1964
10-30-2006, 10:19 PM
I'm sure most folks here(other than the youngest),grew up during some portion of the Cold War (http://www.conelrad.com/index.php),which means unless you lived 'in the country',you likely had a local air raid siren (http://www.airraidsirens.com/).

What type did you grow up near?
I had a Thunderbolt 1000 (http://www.airraidsirens.com/mp3/thunderbolt1000t.mp3),4 blocks away,and I used to love monthly test time.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i314/DMFesel/200px-Bomber.jpg

Lyrics from Naked Raygun's "Rat Patrol".
"What we need to take control,we could use the Rat Patrol.What's that coming over the dune?...
Chasing the halftracks across the sandflats,got a nice pine box,for that desert fox,machine guns blaring,and Arabs staring wondering why,the Westerners are there.It's the same old story,and it'll happen again."

LEBillfish
10-30-2006, 11:47 PM
We never had them up in the mountains of Tennesee.........Yet here is what my husband remembers raised partially near detroit...every Saturday at noon.........Not going to post the sounds only, the site too ggod to be passed up...

What a wonderful/horrible era

http://www.victorysiren.com/x/main.htm<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<span class="ev_code_BLACK">"Does this make my Hien look big?"
"I love my Ha-40's"
"She loves teh Swallow"
"Don't call me cho-cho san"
</span>

Esel1964
10-31-2006, 12:17 AM
LEBillfish-That is a cool site,the "start/idle" audio would make a good Windows 'start up' PC sound effect. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I too have an ex-Detroit native for a spouse,I'll have to show that to her.Thanks for sharing. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i314/DMFesel/200px-Bomber.jpg

Lyrics from Naked Raygun's "Rat Patrol".
"What we need to take control,we could use the Rat Patrol.What's that coming over the dune?...
Chasing the halftracks across the sandflats,got a nice pine box,for that desert fox,machine guns blaring,and Arabs staring wondering why,the Westerners are there.It's the same old story,and it'll happen again."

Chuck_Older
10-31-2006, 09:36 AM
I was born in '71 in Boston, and I lived in Somerville for a while (right next to Boston), grew up in Dedham (right next to Boston), and lived in Roslindale (right next to Boston), and now live in Jamaica Plain (you guessed it). I never recall even seeing an air raid siren, and I was in Boston proper at least 2 times a week for most of the first half of my life. I definitely never heard one that I can recall, although I do remember riding on the section of the Boston Elevated railway near Causeway Street as a very small child.

But I do recall that when I saw the Blues Brothers for the first time in the mid '80s, I knew what they had stolen and put on the roof of the black and white

So while I did not grow up in the sticks, nor really am I considered 'young', nope, did not grow up near an air raid siren

RCAF_Irish_403
10-31-2006, 02:23 PM
we fire our EWS sirens up at 1300hr every 1st Saturday of the month. Why? Who knows....with the speed of modern ICBM/SLBM it's all pretty archaic. The only "warning" you are likely to get regarding an incoming warhead is when one blows up nearby<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

F6_Ace
10-31-2006, 02:31 PM
We had an air raid siren about half a mile from the house stuck on top of a sub station. I think it was installed in the '40s.

There was also a siren visible in one of the fields we could see from the front of the house that was about 3 miles away. I don't recall ever hearing any of them being tested (which is just as well - imagine the panic)

I went to a school that was about 2 miles from what was supposed to be a C&C/early warning station so we always thought ourselves lucky that if it did happen, it would at least be fairly quick and painless.

Also, while looking this siren business up, just found that a Spitfire crashed pretty much at the end of the road where I used to live:

http://www.caverswall.org.uk/spitfire.html

Never knew that!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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TC_Stele
10-31-2006, 02:58 PM
Never had the sirens experience, but I do remember my dad having to work with gov't contractors while working on making the Seawolf submarine.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

=====================
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crazyivan1970
10-31-2006, 03:27 PM
Born 1970 western USSR http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Oh yea, i remember all that. I even remember one of the art projects i did when i was in middle school.... and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...oh yea, those were the times hehe. Life can turn in the weird ways...here i am...citizen of US haha http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

V!
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faustnik
10-31-2006, 03:28 PM
Originally posted by crazyivan1970:
and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...oh yea, those were the times hehe. Life can turn in the weird ways...here i am...citizen of US haha http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

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Von_Rat
10-31-2006, 03:38 PM
i was born in the fiftys,, i remember air raid drills in school, and the city testing the sirens every tuesday at 10am. i also remember the tv tests of the emergency broadcast network.


people biotch and complain about the international situation as it is today. to me this international situation is a paradise compared to the potential horror that myself and others grew up with during the cold war.

a few hundred years from now, historians will look back and think we were insane to come so close to destroying civilisation.


i thank god its over.

RCAF_Irish_403
10-31-2006, 03:57 PM
Originally posted by Von_Rat:
i was born in the fiftys,, i remember air raid drills in school, and the city testing the sirens every tuesday at 10am. i also remember the tv tests of the emergency broadcast network.


people biotch and complain about the international situation as it is today. to me this international situation is a paradise compared to the potential horror that myself and others grew up with during the cold war.

a few hundred years from now, historians will look back and think we were insane to come so close to destroying civilisation.


i thank god its over.

Not even close to over, m8. if you really want to scare yourself click on the link in my sig.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

leitmotiv
10-31-2006, 03:57 PM
Born Oct '52. Grew up with duck and cover drills. Was visiting a friend in a small W Virginia town in '86---about 40 miles from DC. Suddenly air raid siren on top of the courthouse starts wailing and doesn't stop. I lit a cig and stood in front of a window in order to get aced by the blast in one quick death. Friend walks in and she tells me the the siren is to let everybody know it's noon. From cosmic doom to slapstick in 1 second.

Chuck_Older
10-31-2006, 04:02 PM
Originally posted by crazyivan1970:
Born 1970 western USSR http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Oh yea, i remember all that. I even remember one of the art projects i did when i was in middle school.... and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...oh yea, those were the times hehe. Life can turn in the weird ways...here i am...citizen of US haha http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jeez! How can you tell a story like that on Halloween night and not tell me how it ended for Uncle Sam's plan!!?!?!?!?

triad773
10-31-2006, 04:06 PM
I was born the week of the Cuban Missle Crises.

Where I live, they tested those sirens every Tuesday at 10:00 AM. Thinking about it if someone were to mount an attack, they sure would have done it then! Some time ago they cut it back to 1st Tusday of every month I think. They still use those sirens in my local to notify people if there is a tornado approaching.

Remember those Civil Defence test broadcasts? I remember a parody poster that was classic. Went something like this:

'This is only a test.
Had this been an actual emergency, you would have been instructed how to put your head between your knees, and kiss your @$$ goodbye'.

The children of the Cold war, who grew up in fear of Nuclear Annhilation, have been replaced by the generation that now must consider the threat of terrorism daily in thier lives.

Unfortunate indeed.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.triad773.com/images/he100-7.jpg
Online on HL as {BR}Triad

F6_Ace
10-31-2006, 04:06 PM
i thank god its over

When did it end? I think the threat level fell at the end of the 80s/early 90s but it's been creeping up ever so slowly since. Mass annihilation I would say had passed....for the present.

It's all the near misses that surprised me, like that Russian guy who decided not to pass on the early warning that a full scale strike was underway to his superiors as he thought it was a malfunction. It was.

And Yeltsin..who supposedly was within 3 minutes of retaliating to a supposed attack in the 90s.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004YL1M.01.MZZZZZZZ.jpg

SeaFireLIV
10-31-2006, 04:11 PM
Born late `60s, but it never really dawned on me about the danger we were in until around the early 1980s and by then most people seemed to have the attitude of "Best be directly under a nuke when they finally drop..."

I was still going to Church then and I asked the Minister what`s God going to do about our ultimately demise under the madness of multiple nukes and he said, "I don`t believe that God will allow the earth to be destroyed by nuclear weapons because then the Word of God cannot be carried out. God really controls what man can do."

I was 18 and dismissed his words, but to my astonished, the war between the Americans and the Russians hasn`t happened. The Nukes haven`t dropped in their droves...

Makes you really think...<div class="ev_tpc_signature">


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"If it burns, it is confirmed."

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rnzoli
10-31-2006, 04:12 PM
raised on the east side of the iron curtain, supposedly being your life-long enemy http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif (then came satellite TV and changed the world order http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif )

the other day I showed my son the high-school book we got for studying 'patriotic homeland defense', the part where the instructions are for...

what to do in case of seeing a nuclear explosion nearby http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

well, the procedure says you have to lay down, face down, legs towards the explosion, head away from it

I was always wondering why it did matter.... we would have all evaporated in minutes anyway...<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

A "world's first": fully automatic, dedicated COOP server controller. Features and available servers here (http://web.t-online.hu/rnzoli/IL2DSC/intro-coop.html).
http://web.t-online.hu/rnzoli/IL2DSC/the_full_difficulty_COOP_server.JPG (http://web.t-online.hu/rnzoli/IL2DSC/intro-coop.html)

huggy87
10-31-2006, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by crazyivan1970:
Born 1970 western USSR http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Oh yea, i remember all that. I even remember one of the art projects i did when i was in middle school.... and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...oh yea, those were the times hehe. Life can turn in the weird ways...here i am...citizen of US haha http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Not after I let the INS know about this. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Chuck_Older
10-31-2006, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by RCAF_Irish_403:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Von_Rat:
i was born in the fiftys,, i remember air raid drills in school, and the city testing the sirens every tuesday at 10am. i also remember the tv tests of the emergency broadcast network.


people biotch and complain about the international situation as it is today. to me this international situation is a paradise compared to the potential horror that myself and others grew up with during the cold war.

a few hundred years from now, historians will look back and think we were insane to come so close to destroying civilisation.


i thank god its over.

Not even close to over, m8. if you really want to scare yourself click on the link in my sig. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Cold War refers to the undeclared war of technological and weapons advancement, detected and suspected spying such as the USN's cable tapping and the John Walker spy ring, and other close-to-open-hostility relations concerning the former Soviet Union and the United States. It was closely related to a showdown between the two Superpowers on the Nuclear battlefield over their different ideologies.

The Cold War is over, by necessity; the USSR is defunct. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif People may say that the terrorist situation today, the use of bio and chemical warfare, etc, make the end of the world as close as ever, not to mention the threat of nuclear war, but it is not part of the Cold War. The Cold War was so named because a 'shooting war' is "Hot". There were plenty of shots exchanged in the Cold War, but none of them resulted in open warfare between the two countries. I think people who say the Cold War is still on don't remember the Gorbachev and Reagan era, and the rounds of talks like SALT II

You may consider the things in the site you linked to evidence of the continued Cold War, but in my opinion, you are mistaken, and lending a name to the situation that means something else http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

leitmotiv
10-31-2006, 04:31 PM
My mother was a teacher. She had to attend a lecture by U.S. Gov people on the real situation regarding Civil Defense. Year: about 1960. She took me along. I was the only kid there. First off, they said the evacuation plans were for morale purposes and nothing more, i.e., everybody was going to die when the missiles hit the biggest inland port in California (Stockton). Said to quit wasting time on air raid shelters and all that stuff. Magnitude One reality check for a little kid. I rationalized it as better to know you would be toast than to have illusions about survival.

Welcome to the U.S., crazyivan---glad we all didn't cream each other! Now we are all unified by Oleg! Who would have dreamed a Russian aero nut would be the king of WWII simulation for the whole world? We all dodged that bullet, and , for now, have a happy ending.

RCAF_Irish_403
10-31-2006, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RCAF_Irish_403:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Von_Rat:
i was born in the fiftys,, i remember air raid drills in school, and the city testing the sirens every tuesday at 10am. i also remember the tv tests of the emergency broadcast network.


people biotch and complain about the international situation as it is today. to me this international situation is a paradise compared to the potential horror that myself and others grew up with during the cold war.

a few hundred years from now, historians will look back and think we were insane to come so close to destroying civilisation.


i thank god its over.

Not even close to over, m8. if you really want to scare yourself click on the link in my sig. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Cold War refers to the undeclared war of technological and weapons advancement, detected and suspected spying such as the USN's cable tapping and the John Walker spy ring, and other close-to-open-hostility relations concerning the former Soviet Union and the United States. It was closely related to a showdown between the two Superpowers on the Nuclear battlefield over their different ideologies.

The Cold War is over, by necessity; the USSR is defunct. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif People may say that the terrorist situation today, the use of bio and chemical warfare, etc, make the end of the world as close as ever, not to mention the threat of nuclear war, but it is not part of the Cold War. The Cold War was so named because a 'shooting war' is "Hot". There were plenty of shots exchanged in the Cold War, but none of them resulted in open warfare between the two countries. I think people who say the Cold War is still on don't remember the Gorbachev and Reagan era, and the rounds of talks like SALT II

You may consider the things in the site you linked to evidence of the continued Cold War, but in my opinion, you are mistaken, and lending a name to the situation that means something else http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

i didn't explain myself...the FAS website (Federation of American Scientist) is a non-profit, non ideologically driven group who wants to keep people informed on weapons proliferation of all kinds. These guys aren't stuck in the 1960's. The Cold War is over-no doubt....but the hardware is still around and new stuff is in the works.
The US is working on a whole new generation of small yield H Bombs to be used on a hypothetical battlefield of the future. We've pushed on with SDI technology to help us survive a limited missle attack. Don't get me started on Iran/DPRK....Not to mention China's military build up. India and Pakistan are on hair trigger alert....Unlike the US/USSR, Pakistan and India have fought several full scale wars in the past.

Anyways, look at the site as there is more info than i can relate.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

Von_Rat
10-31-2006, 04:40 PM
Originally posted by F6_Ace:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">i thank god its over

When did it end? I think the threat level fell at the end of the 80s/early 90s but it's been creeping up ever so slowly since. Mass annihilation I would say had passed....for the present.

It's all the near misses that surprised me, like that Russian guy who decided not to pass on the early warning that a full scale strike was underway to his superiors as he thought it was a malfunction. It was.

And Yeltsin..who supposedly was within 3 minutes of retaliating to a supposed attack in the 90s. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

anything that could reasonably happen today is nothing at all, compared to what almost happened back when the cold war was at its hieght.

triad773
10-31-2006, 04:44 PM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
Welcome to the U.S., crazyivan---glad we all didn't cream each other! Now we are all unified by Oleg! Who would have dreamed a Russian aero nut would be the king of WWII simulation for the whole world? We all dodged that bullet, and , for now, have a happy ending.

Yes! A very nice watershed of the Cold War ending and Globalisation, we have this wonderful aviation enthusiast (Oleg) that can share his vision with the world, and so we might all enjoy and share in it too http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.triad773.com/images/he100-7.jpg
Online on HL as {BR}Triad

RCAF_Irish_403
10-31-2006, 04:46 PM
Originally posted by triad773:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by leitmotiv:
Welcome to the U.S., crazyivan---glad we all didn't cream each other! Now we are all unified by Oleg! Who would have dreamed a Russian aero nut would be the king of WWII simulation for the whole world? We all dodged that bullet, and , for now, have a happy ending.

Yes! A very nice watershed of the Cold War ending and Globalisation, we have this wonderful aviation enthusiast (Oleg) that can share his vision with the world, and so we might all enjoy and share in it too http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

that thought has crossed my mind more than once<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

RCAF_Irish_403
10-31-2006, 04:52 PM
Originally posted by Von_Rat:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by F6_Ace:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">i thank god its over

When did it end? I think the threat level fell at the end of the 80s/early 90s but it's been creeping up ever so slowly since. Mass annihilation I would say had passed....for the present.

It's all the near misses that surprised me, like that Russian guy who decided not to pass on the early warning that a full scale strike was underway to his superiors as he thought it was a malfunction. It was.

And Yeltsin..who supposedly was within 3 minutes of retaliating to a supposed attack in the 90s. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

anything that could reasonably happen today is nothing at all, compared to what almost happened back when the cold war was at its hieght. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I can agree with that to a degree. I still think there is a greater chance of a nuclear weapon being used today<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

leitmotiv
10-31-2006, 05:13 PM
Better to be a chaotic community of howling, cursing, opinionated simmers venting various gripes on this forum than to be locked behind closed borders, not knowing anything about each other, and expecting eventual mutual extermination. The UN is a joke compared to the real united/disunited nation of simmers. Blowing each other to bits virtually is a magnitude more civilized than anything anybody could have imagined in years past. We certainly are learning a heck of a lot more about each other (possibly a not entirely good thing!!!!). Those sociologists/psychologists who disparage forums and such and PC games don't have a clue. PAX

J.M.LLOYD
10-31-2006, 05:20 PM
I was born in 1944, about 3 weeks after the Normandy landings, so my recall would be in the early fifties in South Wales,UK. There were still large air raid shelters dotted around my local town,one i remember was being used by the town football team as a changing room,these all being left over from the Blitz[WW11]My recollection was that they were well built,thick flat concrete roof,heavy steel door with blast wall.My older brother recalls that the scrap yard of the local Steelworks contained dozens of tanks[Allied-Axis]still with the reminders of their crews[patches of dried blood inside the holed turrets,these may not be memories of a cold war, but a very,very hot one

super71957
10-31-2006, 05:47 PM
Born in 1957 and raised in N.Miami,Florida.
I remember having to practice getting under our desk once a week at school.
And yes emergency broadcast testing on tv.
The thing is we children, of course ,did not have a clue.
And with the Cuban Missile Crisis right down the street sheesh,We didn"t have a chance in h@ll!!
I can only thank God looking back now that nothing happened.

Craig

vocatx
10-31-2006, 07:09 PM
I was born in 1964 in central Texas. I live so far out in the sticks, there aren't any air raid sirens or shelters. We did do the "duck and cover" drills in school up to about 1973, but then they stopped doing them. We only had tornado drills after that. I can remember the Emergency Broadcast System tests on TV and radio.

With Austin, San Antonio, Abilene, and San Angelo surrounding us, all having Air Force bases at the time, and Ft. Hood about the same distance, the threat seemed very real to us.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

4H_V-man
The 2nd Horseman

BfHeFwMe
10-31-2006, 07:29 PM
Yeah, only city boys and sissies need sirens.

I remember playing out in the wierd sunshine at school and home, getting constant bloody noses along with half my class after recess. Wasn't till years later we found out the bastards were doing above ground testing and not warning the public about the radiation clouds falling from hundreds of miles away.

It ain't the nations or poloy-social views, it's yours and ours inept politicians who are the main threat. Power draws meglomaniacs like flies. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Valencia, returning in his shot-up but airworthy Hellcat after his harrowing February 1944 mission over Truk, summed up the thoughts of many pilots about Hellcats: ?If they could cook, I?d marry one.?

Esel1964
10-31-2006, 07:46 PM
I was born 1964 in Waco,TX,so my experiences were very similar to Vocatx,other than the sirens.
Waco used to have about 10 Thunderbolt 1000's,we could hear obviously the one a few blocks away,and about 4 others off in the distance.
Test day was the first Friday at 10 AM(unless there was bad weather,because they were used for tornadoes also),and when they'd all be wailing away it sounded really cool.
Thank God they never had to be used for their intended purposes,and thank God Russian/American relations good.

Growing up,eventhough we had drills,you saw 'Fallout Shelters' around,and those green drums with yellow lettering that had rations in them at large public venues;I never 'worried' about any of it til my 18th birthday,when I had to go to the Post Office and register for the draft.That's when the magnitude of it all hit me like an 18-wheeler,up til then,I was just a happy-go-lucky kid and never worried about it much.

Oh,and the Thunderbolt 1000's,I guess somebody somewhere decided they were too old,so they tore them down.They put up some "modern" tornado sirens,that I've never heard,eventhough they claim they've activated them 3 times during storms. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/disagree.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i314/DMFesel/200px-Bomber.jpg

Lyrics from Naked Raygun's "Rat Patrol".
"What we need to take control,we could use the Rat Patrol.What's that coming over the dune?...
Chasing the halftracks across the sandflats,got a nice pine box,for that desert fox,machine guns blaring,and Arabs staring wondering why,the Westerners are there.It's the same old story,and it'll happen again."

RCAF_Irish_403
11-01-2006, 03:34 AM
Originally posted by BfHeFwMe:
Yeah, only city boys and sissies need sirens.

I remember playing out in the wierd sunshine at school and home, getting constant bloody noses along with half my class after recess. Wasn't till years later we found out the bastards were doing above ground testing and not warning the public about the radiation clouds falling from hundreds of miles away.

It ain't the nations or poloy-social views, it's yours and ours inept politicians who are the main threat. Power draws meglomaniacs like flies. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Wow. Where did you grow up if you don't mind me asking?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

slipBall
11-01-2006, 03:56 AM
Yes the sirens, remember them well....also the crawling under my school desk, as part of a drill....they were made of white oak....and would protect up to 40 mega ton direct blast....yea right http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/orders.jpg

flakwagen
11-01-2006, 05:42 AM
I remember watching Soviet May Day parades on the TV. The precision with which they marched was impressive. Our military rarely ever marches in public, and they never march with anything bigger than rifles. I was particularly fascinated by the Soviet tanker helmets, as they looked very futuristic to me- kind of like Star Wars XWing pilot helmets.

Flak

Bearcat99
11-01-2006, 06:01 AM
I remember duck and cover... I also remember the Cuban Missle Crisis... We had to do those drills in school where you crawl under your desk.... LOL...<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<UL TYPE=SQUARE>http://star.walagata.com/w/bearcat/tuskegeebondposter.jpg (http://www.tuskegeeairmen.org)[/list]<UL TYPE=SQUARE> 332nd V.F.G. (http://www.geocities.com/bearcat99th/) [/list]
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Jagdgeschwader2
11-01-2006, 06:18 AM
Born in 1971 in Dallas,TX. There was a fallout shelter a block away from my house at the local elementary school. I still remember the ugly yellow and black sign posted above the door that lead to the basement. I remember watching that movie called "The Day After" or something like that. We had a big meeting in the assembly hall because some of the kids were so scared. I lived near a major airport so I doubt the fallout shelter would have done me any good. The sirens only go off around here when a tornado is possible which I find much more frightening. Anyway glad thats over now.


http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg <div class="ev_tpc_signature">

I'll keep a light on in the dog house window for ya!

RCAF_Irish_403
11-01-2006, 06:23 AM
My tiny little Catholic grade school was still running "Duck & Cover" Drills in the early 1980's. Madness. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

I later learned that, because of the heavy auto manufacturing/Dow Chemical Plant/major airport and rail junctions, that my hometown had something like 100-200 Megatons of High Explosives aimed at it. What my desk was going to do to save me is unexplainable http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

I remember seeing those silly DoD animations of "Star Wars" shooting down Soviet ICBM's on the nightly news. At the time, i thought that stuff was really happening in real time...i didn't understand that they were hypothetical situations. I thought we were shooting down Russian missles every day! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

The night "The Day After" aired on ABC, my parents sent me and my younger brother to an aunt's house. My folks wanted to see it, but didn't want to freak us out<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

LEXX_Luthor
11-01-2006, 07:26 AM
I grew up in small town Mississippie. Tornado drills were the big thing in school, and not nukes, althought that was the early 80s so the Cold War was about over anyways. Maybe the 50s were different.

I saw Dr. Strangelove again last night, and I noticed something new -- while General Turgidson (Georgec C. Scott) was desperately trying to get off the phone with his sugar, Steins asks the President (Peter Sellers) what to do about civil defense. The President mumbled...


mmmmmm
And that's it. I have read that Ussians truly depended on the MAD doctrine of Mutual Assured Destruction, while the Russians actually believe, and planned on, winning a full scale nucular exhchange. Hence the Russian's far greater civil defense efforts.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

__________________
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"You will still have FB, you will lose nothing" ~WUAF_Badsight
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:
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Close this book forever and don't open anymore!" ~Oleg_Maddox http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

leitmotiv
11-01-2006, 10:34 AM
I had a friend who was doing research for Hughes using classified Soviet doctrine in the '80's. He told me, have no illusions, the Sovs planned to advance across Western Europe behind a rolling barrage of tactical nukes which would have left only ruins. Two reasons: (1) destroy NATO land units, and, diabolically, (2) leave no trace of rich Western culture to cause grievance in the Sov Army and the Warsaw Pact. In so many words, they had learned from WWII in every sense.

R_Target
11-01-2006, 11:10 AM
I spent most of the '70's growing up on or near US Army bases in Germany with three years at White Sands Missle Range right in the middle. There were always sirens going off at WSMR (tests I guess), and jets were constantly screaming out of Holloman AFB up the road.

Other Cold War memories: Brandenburg Gate and Checkpoint Charlie in '79, air shows at Ramstein AFB every year, dreams of Russian tanks rolling through my backyard.

Outdoor museum at WSMR, went here alot when I was a kid:

http://www.wsmr-history.org/Photos/MissilePark.jpg <div class="ev_tpc_signature">

*+
http://img273.imageshack.us/img273/4695/shidensigao4.jpg

RCAF_Irish_403
11-01-2006, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by LEXX_Luthor:
I grew up in small town Mississippie. Tornado drills were the big thing in school, and not nukes, althought that was the early 80s so the Cold War was about over anyways. Maybe the 50s were different.

I saw Dr. Strangelove again last night, and I noticed something new -- while General Turgidson (Georgec C. Scott) was desperately trying to get off the phone with his sugar, Steins asks the President (Peter Sellers) what to do about civil defense. The President mumbled...

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">mmmmmm
And that's it. I have read that Ussians truly depended on the MAD doctrine of Mutual Assured Destruction, while the Russians actually believe, and planned on, winning a full scale nucular exhchange. Hence the Russian's far greater civil defense efforts. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Here is part of the 1979 OTA study looking at US/Soviet Civil Defence Measures (http://www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/7906/790605.pdf)

This is the full Declassified report regarding what life would be like after a nuclear war (http://www.fas.org/nuke/intro/nuke/7906/index.html)

you will need Acrobat 3.0 to view<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

airdale1960
11-01-2006, 11:56 AM
Born in Sep 1960, was a in the Aleutians during the end of it (missile Warning). Am now vet of Gulf war 1 and 2, the **** now is much more volital and unnerving than the cat and mouse or spy vs spy of the Cold War.

Hanglands
11-01-2006, 12:25 PM
I can remember my dad being in the Royal Observer Corps, a bit like the cold war version of the Territorial Army.

Every week he and his colleagues used to go and sit in a bunker (like these http://www.subbrit.org.uk/rsg/roc/index2.shtml ) on the outskirts of a nearby villiage. They used to simulate or wait for a nuclear war to start to they could measure fall out and bomb blast strength (maybe thats where I get my ideas from?). My mum used to tell me they basically sat in this underground bunker playing cards and smoking.

Then I remember when there was a strong percieved threat on nuclear war perpetuated by a government leaflet campaign (anyone in the UK remember all the Protect and Survive civil defence leaflets?). Well, these were leaflets dropped through your door with the newspaper, telling you how to live under your kitchen table, defacating into a bucket, eating only tinned food, and using feather duster as airfilters etc would save you if next door was hit by a warhead.

I can actually recall our nextdoor neighbours but one coming round and asking if my dad could get them into the bunker if the war actually kicked off.

I found my dads old bunker a few years ago, its on a hill on a farm in Sawtry, Hunts. Its been filled in now and acts as foundations for a mobile phone mast.

I remember Vulcan bombers flying over all the time..... oh those were the days.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m203/ChickenHawk_2006/logoHH.jpg (http://www.geocities.com/hanglands/)

F6_Ace
11-01-2006, 12:36 PM
I remember watching Threads back in the day and deciding that if a nuclear war did occur, I'd prefer to be vapourised in the first instance.

I think the film had it where Britain's population would bottom out at medieval levels about 18 (?) years after bombs dropped.

I wonder what really would have happened, though, in a "complete" nuclear exchange? Northern hemisphere (US, Canada, UK, Mainland Europe, Russia, China, Japan) largely destroyed and populations mostly annihilated whilst large areas of non-threatening areas (Africa, South America, Australasia) would remain largely intact but have to deal with massive fallout and nuclear winters (?)<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004YL1M.01.MZZZZZZZ.jpg

leitmotiv
11-01-2006, 12:38 PM
My hope was always to be right under the airburst, F6_Ace!

When we went to Sacramento we would see the B-52s at Mather Air Force Base belching huge trails of black smoke as they took off, or loitering in the sky over Sac. In the '60's, the USAF was not as heavily restricted as now, sonic booms all the time, C-141s growling over residential areas at low altitude. You knew your Air Force "never sleeps". I never expected to live to be thirty (I'm 54). Saw Watkin's THE WAR GAME (1965, not the idiotic '80's film) in 1969 and it scared the blazes out of me, not that I needed much more scaring after 1960-62.

raaaid
11-01-2006, 12:55 PM
well this world has gone before through this despicble circusnatances, whats been hidden from us, remember the sumerian tellings of the poisoned wind after gods wars from which soldier wash themselvels and weapons

AWL_Spinner
11-01-2006, 12:59 PM
I remember watching Threads back in the day and deciding that if a nuclear war did occur, I'd prefer to be vapourised in the first instance. I think the film had it where Britain's population would bottom out at medieval levels about 18 (?) years after bombs dropped.

I purchased this on DVD recently as the era interests me greatly (having grown up seeing Lightings and Vulcans at airshows and never really appreciating what they were FOR), and it's quite shocking.

The fond nostalgia value of the preamble to the war, the 1980s setting, is in shocking contrast with the grim portrayal of a nuclear exchange. Such a war was in everyone's minds in those days, global annihilation, I get so angry when I hear ****s like John Reid (UK home secretary to you non-Brits) saying that the terrorist threat today is "the worst threat since WWII", wilfully forgetting forty years of real cold war fear.

I think everyone should watch Threads (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Threads-Karen-Meagher/dp/B0009S9LNK/sr=8-1/qid=1162410835/ref=pd_ka_1/026-8298382-0489233?ie=UTF8&s=dvd)!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Cheers, Spinner

<hr class="ev_code_hr" />
o Squads! Take a look at the ADW War (http://adwwar.com/en/#), it's fantastic!
o Spinner has been alive in ADW for a maximum of: 3hrs 38mins!

leitmotiv
11-01-2006, 01:03 PM
In the US we had THE DAY AFTER on TV in 1983, which was horrific. This was when Cap Weinberger talked about a "winnable" nuclear war. Agh.

RCAF_Irish_403
11-01-2006, 01:14 PM
Originally posted by AWL_Spinner:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I remember watching Threads back in the day and deciding that if a nuclear war did occur, I'd prefer to be vapourised in the first instance. I think the film had it where Britain's population would bottom out at medieval levels about 18 (?) years after bombs dropped.

I purchased this on DVD recently as the era interests me greatly (having grown up seeing Lightings and Vulcans at airshows and never really appreciating what they were FOR), and it's quite shocking.

The fond nostalgia value of the preamble to the war, the 1980s setting, is in shocking contrast with the grim portrayal of a nuclear exchange. Such a war was in everyone's minds in those days, global annihilation, I get so angry when I hear ****s like John Reid (UK home secretary to you non-Brits) saying that the terrorist threat today is "the worst threat since WWII", wilfully forgetting forty years of real cold war fear.

I think everyone should watch Threads (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Threads-Karen-Meagher/dp/B0009S9LNK/sr=8-1/qid=1162410835/ref=pd_ka_1/026-8298382-0489233?ie=UTF8&s=dvd)! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Threads is easily the most depressing film i've ever seen. It covers not only the immediate effects of a nuclear war, but what life would be like for survivors a full generation afterwards. Basically we get kicked back into the Dark Ages.
The Day After is good, but they gloss over a lot of things (this was basically due to corporate and political pressure)....IMHO ABC chickened out, caved in and cut the movie nearly in half. It was originally slated to be a 4 hr movie. The film's director threatened to pull his name from the credits and was finally persuaded to keep his name on after a disclaimer was tagged at the very end of the movie admitting that the real thing would be much worse.
Haven't seen The War Game, however the film has just been released on DVD....i plan on seeing it for sure.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

F6_Ace
11-01-2006, 01:15 PM
I got a copy of Threads last year and watched it again. My missus was half watching it until the bombs dropped then was horrified to see what lay in store for anyone unlucky enough to survive. She'd never seen the film before. Depressing isn't the word.

Without wishing to get into a 'what is best' type affair, people who have seen both always told me there was a noticeable difference between Threads and The Day After with the latter being like an 'upbeat' Threads. Anyone seen both and can say whether that is true?

I think it's fair to say that no one wins a nuclear war and that's good...because it has meant that no one has been fool enough to try yet.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004YL1M.01.MZZZZZZZ.jpg

leitmotiv
11-01-2006, 01:26 PM
I didn't know THE DAY AFTER had been butchered, RCAF_Irish. Typical. Still, that scene with Minutemen shooting out of the Midwestern farm land was one of the eeriest I've ever seen.

Von_Rat
11-01-2006, 01:57 PM
Originally posted by F6_Ace:


I wonder what really would have happened, though, in a "complete" nuclear exchange? Northern hemisphere (US, Canada, UK, Mainland Europe, Russia, China, Japan) largely destroyed and populations mostly annihilated whilst large areas of non-threatening areas (Africa, South America, Australasia) would remain largely intact but have to deal with massive fallout and nuclear winters (?)


read, ON THE BEACH, it has that very premise. most of the book takes place in australia.
the book isnt very scientific, but its a good read.

there was a movie also, that starred fred astire.

Von_Rat
11-01-2006, 02:07 PM
Originally posted by crazyivan1970:
Born 1970 western USSR http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Oh yea, i remember all that. I even remember one of the art projects i did when i was in middle school.... and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...oh yea, those were the times hehe. Life can turn in the weird ways...here i am...citizen of US haha http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


it would be very interesting if we could get more people who live in the former east bloc to post their memories here.

LEBillfish
11-01-2006, 02:10 PM
Well, I cannot comment much on this topic due to my rather odd childhood....What I can say however is in the 70's and even 80's (60's was really in the wilds)...In third world countries there was a tremendous fear of the common man that if they ever angered the U.S./U.S.S.R./P.R.C./G.B. etc.. That the "bomb" would be used without hesitation by those nations even though conventional weapons alone would easily dominate them.....

Now that was by the little guy, I'm sure the governments knew better....Yet it made for a lot of fear, and also hate at times. Being an orphan sort of U.S. citizen...You can imagine it made for some exciting times for me.


HOWEVER........

I spoke with my husband who though born in 1961 in Tennessee and raised in suburban Michigan, is one of those sorts who remembers little details even back to when he was an infant....Essentially he had this to say about a number of things, and I'll try and put it as though he's speaking as the interview look came out stupid.....

In the 60's we grew up knowing clearly about the bomb...However, though there was a great deal of fear that at any moment the U.S.S.R. might launch an attack, in the back of your mind in that era many felt the U.S. could actually "win" such a conflict.

We had all the drills, duck and cover, moving into air raid C.D. shelters in many of the schools basements, even our home, and so on...and always knew it was noon on Saturday by the Air Raid sirens sounding.......Emergency Alert tests on TV and radio were regular, and in fact Civil Defense literature was easy to come by (we still have much of it here from the era). Additionally, just in case http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif, canned food was pantried in a special part of the basement and everyone knew how they would need to dig up their gardens next to the house to pile dirt up against the windows and top of the basement walls outside "immediately" after an attack.

Yet by the 60's and due to the confidence that came with that time....Folks had begun to take on a slightly lighter attitude of it. Horror movies of the 50's and 60's that naturally picked up on the "mutant" theme were looked on in horror by adults, chuckled at by teens and thought of as "cool" by kids.

So over time a conditioning of sorts took place. You simply "lived with the bomb"...It wasn't a big deal, what was a big deal, a particularly scary event though was when the Air Raid siren did not sound one Saturday...Adults became nervous and through watching their parents some children panicked, as what IF it was coming?

The early 70's things changed even more....Drills tapered off or were renamed "tornado" drills....C.D. seemed to shift to weather sorts of activities as did Emergency Alerts. Now be sure, the usual post nuclear mutant sci-fi was really laughed at, almost becoming an unused theme due to education. Yet films such as Failsafe & even Dr. StrangeLove would bring an eerie calm over people....Even the latter at the end, simply was just to real a topic for most to scoff at. Yet for the most part it was put aside.

What became a great fear was Bio-weapons in the later 70's. People became better educated to them, and information as it leaked out as to things such as virus's developed that would wipe out all life on the planet had a number quite scared....Yet at that time, it almost seemed as though it was only the U.S. that had them........So suddenly fears of "what if one escaped (andromeda Strain)...Or what if a nuke "accidentally" went off generated more fear then the ever looming war.....Hence people pressuring the government for their destruction.

Now for true culture shock and actually "embracing the bomb"....In the late 70's things had been rather good for a while, on into the early 80's......Suddenly, to the generations of late teens/early 20's, the usual upsets, and desire to protest the government came out in a new form........Things were good, so what do you protest?....You can't, so you suddenly start looking to how your own government oppresses you and how can you change it.

The Soviets were no longer believed to be this all terrible war mongering threat, beliefs of them all being these brute looking hating all but communist peoples long faded.....So they almost, or the potential for conflict with them took on a "positive" what if flare.....

Post holocaust movies thrived....Quite a few people actually considering the good (forgetting all the bad of it) and possibilities that would exist.....Racing around in fast cars, no laws, no governments....Men wearing tight leathers, women wearing virtually nothing at all.....No rules too right let anarchy rein!!!......So punk, and all that went with it and was spawned by it took an iron grip still lasting today and people "Embraced the Bomb" and all the good it would bring us......

Naturally, the Government had better idea's...Like StarWars and so on.......Yet coupled with this post apocalyptic mindset....It really spurred on a whole new generation of Sci-Fi and the dreams of even more possibilities on a less destructive note.

Oddly however, the punker attitude of the good the bomb would bring had become a part of a lot of folks mindsets......That a cleansing would have to take place before these tremendous technological leaps could be made....A thinning of the heard if you will. That attitude, has actually been voiced by a number of high ranking scientists...Their logic being that sudden end of disease, technological wonders, no war and etc. would bring chaos due to the economics of maintaining a war machine collapsing.....So all sorts of what if scenarios were generated, most often with some country like Korea, Pakistan, etc. Getting in some minor war with their enemy....So this country jumps in to help on this side, another that, soon the U.S. and U.S.S.R. do, and wouldn't you know it....Nukes a flyin and after 70% of the worlds population is wiped out...Here comes the new world order with new technology to save the day...Technology that if supplied in the worlds current state would cause mass unemployment, and revolution type of war.

Lastly...A huge let down everyone now "embracing the bomb" though reducing their numbers.........The dern Russians went and gave up!!....No more threat of WWIII, no more chance for MadMax or even a new world order in a snap of a finger....Quite simply wrecking everyone's plan.

That the highlights of his "Nuclear memories" from fearing the bomb, to ignorring it, to seeing it go to a second rate weapon...To embracing it all in the same generation of people.

What a strange type of being we are.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

http://www.siloworld.com/

http://nuclearweaponarchive.org/

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/bomb/sfeature/blastmap.html<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<span class="ev_code_BLACK">"Does this make my Hien look big?"
"I love my Ha-40's"
"She loves teh Swallow"
"Don't call me cho-cho san"
</span>

Capt.England
11-01-2006, 02:18 PM
Originally posted by F6_Ace:
I got a copy of Threads last year and watched it again. My missus was half watching it until the bombs dropped then was horrified to see what lay in store for anyone unlucky enough to survive. She'd never seen the film before. Depressing isn't the word.

Without wishing to get into a 'what is best' type affair, people who have seen both always told me there was a noticeable difference between Threads and The Day After with the latter being like an 'upbeat' Threads. Anyone seen both and can say whether that is true?



I've seen both and what you say is true. Anyone know what the 1950's/60's film that the B.B.C. made was called? I know that it was banned for 30 years and as far as I know was only shown once in 1985.

As for sirens...In Leicester, England, My old school, ARH on Anstey Lane, used to test the siren on it's roof, every year in the 70's to the middle of the 80's. I think it's still there on the roof. I lived on Blackbird road then, and Marconi Radar factory was behind the house. Guess what? Target site for Ivans nuke attack on Leicester.

The most funny thing is that my dad, has told me that the site had a nuke bunker underneath it! (he worked there).
Also, from a ex worker of County hall, I was told that underneath County hall and Glenfield hospital next door, there used to be another large nuke bunker.

I know of some more bunkers, but they are possibly still in use, and I could be breaking the Offical Secrets Act if I tell. Leicestershire is full of them!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Why do joysticks break when you need them the most?

leitmotiv
11-01-2006, 02:26 PM
ON THE BEACH starred Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner---a classic.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053137/

LEBillfish
11-01-2006, 02:31 PM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
ON THE BEACH starred Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner---a classic.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053137/

Oh yea!...I've seen that. Actually.....If you take every movie that uses the bomb in some form or another as its focal point...Be it the above, attack of the 50' woman...planet of the apes, a boy and his dog, on and on....You really start to see an evolution of peoples attitudes toward it.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<span class="ev_code_BLACK">"Does this make my Hien look big?"
"I love my Ha-40's"
"She loves teh Swallow"
"Don't call me cho-cho san"
</span>

Low_Flyer_MkVb
11-01-2006, 02:42 PM
I think your thinking of 'The War Game', Captain.

http://www.mnsi.net/~pwatkins/warGame.htm (http://www.mnsi.net/%7Epwatkins/warGame.htm)<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n47/LFMkVb/1822.jpg

F6_Ace
11-01-2006, 03:24 PM
Originally posted by Capt.England:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by F6_Ace:
I got a copy of Threads last year and watched it again. My missus was half watching it until the bombs dropped then was horrified to see what lay in store for anyone unlucky enough to survive. She'd never seen the film before. Depressing isn't the word.

Without wishing to get into a 'what is best' type affair, people who have seen both always told me there was a noticeable difference between Threads and The Day After with the latter being like an 'upbeat' Threads. Anyone seen both and can say whether that is true?



I've seen both and what you say is true. Anyone know what the 1950's/60's film that the B.B.C. made was called? I know that it was banned for 30 years and as far as I know was only shown once in 1985.

As for sirens...In Leicester, England, My old school, ARH on Anstey Lane, used to test the siren on it's roof, every year in the 70's to the middle of the 80's. I think it's still there on the roof. I lived on Blackbird road then, and Marconi Radar factory was behind the house. Guess what? Target site for Ivans nuke attack on Leicester.

The most funny thing is that my dad, has told me that the site had a nuke bunker underneath it! (he worked there).
Also, from a ex worker of County hall, I was told that underneath County hall and Glenfield hospital next door, there used to be another large nuke bunker.

I know of some more bunkers, but they are possibly still in use, and I could be breaking the Offical Secrets Act if I tell. Leicestershire is full of them! </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Going OT here - sorry - but I have to ask....

Blackbird Road? I used to go to a stock car track at Leicester that closed in the 80s and I think it was off that road somewhere. Do you remember it?

Here is some 'action' from that track when Richie Ahern, later killed after an incident at another track, straight cleared the 5ft wire safety fence.
http://forum.rscnet.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=118009&d=1065119093 <div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004YL1M.01.MZZZZZZZ.jpg

RCAF_Irish_403
11-01-2006, 04:22 PM
Originally posted by F6_Ace:
I got a copy of Threads last year and watched it again. My missus was half watching it until the bombs dropped then was horrified to see what lay in store for anyone unlucky enough to survive. She'd never seen the film before. Depressing isn't the word.

Without wishing to get into a 'what is best' type affair, people who have seen both always told me there was a noticeable difference between Threads and The Day After with the latter being like an 'upbeat' Threads. Anyone seen both and can say whether that is true?

I think it's fair to say that no one wins a nuclear war and that's good...because it has meant that no one has been fool enough to try yet.

Both films work in different ways.

The Day After gets props for setting the film in Kansas/Missouri....right in the American Heartland. In fact, the setting and countryside is almost an uncredited "actor" in a way. The film focuses on the greater Kansas City area. You don't see (or even hear about) LA/Detroit/New York/Chicago etc, but you get the general drift of what has happened. It's all understated.

TDA also gets kudos for ratcheting up the pre-attack tension in an organic and believable (for 1983) way. The only information you get regarding escalating East/West tension is from radio and TV reports on the peripherary of the screen. Well done.

In addition, TDA is a drama, so you invest emotionally in the characters.

Threads is a different beast. Shot pseudo-documentary style it's graphically violent and reptellian cold. Information regarding weapons effects, fallout patterns, post attack socio-economics etc is given by a narrator. Unlike The Day After, this film doesn't rely on the fictional characters to give expositions on concepts related to nuclear war. They just experience it...and the viewer endures. You almost have to take breaks to absorb everything presented. By the end, you're pretty much exhausted.

Threadsis the winner in the make-up and FX department. The science presented is strong.

The Day After wins as an emotionally engaging drama<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Originally posted by marc_hawkins:
Don't be too proud of this technological terror you've constructed. A 108:0 kill ratio is insignificant next to the power of the Force

http://www.fas.org/main/home.jsp

LEBillfish
12-21-2007, 08:16 AM
Thought I'd revive this in light of Top_Gun's thread here.... http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/4991055816

Billy_BigBoy
12-21-2007, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by crazyivan1970:
.... and evil Uncle Sam trying to destroy the happy world (Planet earth) ...


Born in 1965, under a NATO low-level flying route, we were told the Soviets would eventually destroy the world http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

BTW, those movies still fascinate me, here's a list:
Testament (1983)
Threads (1984)
The Day After (1983)
The Wargame (1965)
Special Bulletin (1983)
Trinity and Beyond (1995)
Countdown for Looking Glass (1984, TV)

And the not so serious ones:
Fail Save (1964 and 2000)
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) classic!

Hoatee
12-21-2007, 03:57 PM
Those movies must really have been missed down there in the RSA ('coz of the cultural boycot).

And as far as the Cold War being over - far from it. No state of war exists anywhere that I am aware of, yet combat is taking place and terror still exists. The parties involved are just different.

han freak solo
12-21-2007, 04:19 PM
I never heard a Civil Defense siren and I was born in '65. Lived in small Texas towns with my folks until '72 which ended up being a permanent move to Houston. Lived in the burbs until the city caught up and expanded past. I guess if Houston did have CD sirens going off, we were just far enough away to not know it.

I did hear the air raid siren mounted on the water tower at Texas State Tech College in Waco in the mid '80s. Except it was used only for letting us know the fire trucks were running about. TSTC had old Air Force airfield style firetrucks that also took care of the whole establishment, but the trucks didn't have sirens. So, they broadcast the "siren" from the water tower air raid siren.

Weird.

Strangely enough, I got one of these from a co-worker that was gonna dump it about 5 years ago.

http://onemansblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/09/radiationdetector.jpg

leitmotiv
12-21-2007, 04:41 PM
Born in 1952 and was raised with duck and cover. Never expected to see my 20th birthday.

StG2_Schlachter
12-21-2007, 05:02 PM
Well,
born in 1984 in Hamburg, Germany.
Altough I did not understand the concept
of cold war as a little child I still remember the frequent test alarms. They gave you a weird feeling of a distant menace.
A high perfomance siren was installed on a house that was visible from our kitchen window.

At least twice a year the alarm would sound.
Must have been type HLS 273 or similar.

JG52MadAdler
12-22-2007, 06:45 AM
@ Chuck_Older
Born in 1960 I grew up in the N.E. of Boston.
Air-raid sirens were on the roofs of all local fire stations. They stopped the air raid test in the early sixties. My buds and I pulled the switch on the air-raid siren while the fire fighters were out on a call. about 1969 created some panic.
My father was a fire fighter at another fire station. As i recall i couldn't sit on my a$$ for a month. lol

JZG_Thiem
12-22-2007, 07:22 AM
born in the late 60s in (western) germany.
The house of my grandma has a public air raid warning siren mounted. I remember the air raid sirens going off very frequently (like once every week at least) until the late 80.
Also low flying jets near towns seem to have been much more frequent at those times, at least thats my impression.
Where i was raised, the yanks had the biggest complex of barracks in europe (was near NATO HQ Europe). They trained very frequently in our woods, which pissed us off, since they basically commandeered those areas and used em for their military purposes. Strange feeling at those times, having a walk in the woods with your family, then some M60s driving by. Huge off-lmit areas were there as well with covered bunkers, said to store enough GAS to wipe out all of europe and more. Yanks always denied, yet the fences read *trespassers will be shot on sight*. Otoh, we (kids) always were somehow fascinated with them. Very often we tried to trade some equipment (which would have been reported as *lost*) for a few german beers. In general i remember them as being quite friendly, at least to us kids. One thing that was very common was, that we were standing on a bridge over a highway, watching for passing american convoys. When they came we gave them "V" and cheered, waiting for reaction, which mostly came in the form of a big *honk*.

Went to Ramstein airshow every year (american icecream, YEAH!), until i was drafted for the german army in 1988. So i couldnt attend, which most prolly saved my life, since i always preferred to be near the flightline.
During drills in the german army (field exercise) our seargants and officers always told us (with their tongues in their cheecks) we were fighting the *Swiss* or *Liechtenstein* . We all knew whom we were most prolly gonna fight with those drills facing EAST. Interesting sidenote: all scenarios were the same. THEY attacked from the east first, then we stopped them and threw em back to the german border, not farther.

Back in 1986 we had a school trip to Leipzig and Weimar in the (back then GDR). Was a shocking experience for most of us. Those were considered *showoff* cities for representative purposes. yet everything seemed extremely filthy (sorry have no other words for that). Dirt everywhere, housing and roads in a shockingly bad condition as if WWII had just ended and they are still cleaning up. In front ouf our hostel, a lot of easterners were hanging around trying to trade some Deutschmarks for their worthless eastern Marks. Felt like your visiting a 3rd world country rather than still being in germany only like 300km from home. All im all i felt very sorry for the easterners and wha ti tokk back home with me was the strong (first hand) feeling/experience, of how much they were betrayed by their leaders.

No offense to anyone just my observations and impressions. *Reality* is a very subjective matter i guess.

jurinko
12-22-2007, 07:44 AM
Was born in 1974, Czechoslovakia. In 1983 or 1984 there were some high tensions between NATO and WP. Later I learned that NATO had military exercises "Able Archer" in West Germany and the Soviet paranoia was sure they will come and conquer us all. I was 10 and once we trained how to leave the scholl as fast as possible. There was no A-shelter nearby so I guess we should just scatter between the houses.
I remember that our communistic press hated Reagan as no any other US president before so I guess he did something right http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
I was not drafted after 1989 but people who attended the military service at those times were training the attack all the time http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif still I think our Army┬┤s military capabilities were very questionable.

Platypus_1.JaVA
12-22-2007, 04:22 PM
Being 'build' in 1980, I have no real solid memories about the cold war. Except for when the wall 'fell'. Altough I was a small child, there was something really exciting about it. But I was anoyed on how all the grown-ups where all hysterical about lumps of masonry wich was full of dirt and grafiti that appearantly came from the wall. You probably could make yourself some decent money in those days, if you would've happened to have acces to a demolition site with lumps of masonry.

Some years ago, I wanted insurance for my bicycle. In the event of a nuclear or thermonuclear explosion, your bike is not insured. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif How typical of the Dutch.

Probably a leftover from the cold-war era. They just want to make sure they did not need to give you money in the case that your bike was evaporated and you still could find the insurance papers AND hoping the insurance company still existed.

han freak solo
12-22-2007, 08:45 PM
Originally posted by Platypus_1.JaVA:
Some years ago, I wanted insurance for my bicycle. In the event of a nuclear or thermonuclear explosion, your bike is not insured. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif How typical of the Dutch.


Same in the USA. Insurance exclusions for Acts of War, Riots, etc. I haven't looked at the fine print of a policy in a while. No telling what has been added. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

ultraHun
12-23-2007, 02:21 AM
Originally posted by leitmotiv:
I had a friend who was doing research for Hughes using classified Soviet doctrine in the '80's. He told me, have no illusions, the Sovs planned to advance across Western Europe behind a rolling barrage of tactical nukes which would have left only ruins. Two reasons: (1) destroy NATO land units, and, diabolically, (2) leave no trace of rich Western culture to cause grievance in the Sov Army and the Warsaw Pact. In so many words, they had learned from WWII in every sense.

Are you aware of any pulished sources (internet, books)on this matter? I do believe you, just want to know more.

Born in 1966 in Rhein-Ruhr-Area in Germany. Remembering the trial sirens throughout the 70's and 80's and always wondering whether this time it was for real.

Remembering pretty well the days of the paeace-movement and its arguments or agitation however you want to call it. The Russians were always presented as the reasonable guys and the US as the sole warmonger. Anyway, most of my generation believed war was imminent back then.

Then Libya and US clashed in the early eighties and USAF bombed some Lybian sites ... Some girls in my class were pale because there were Russian ships in some Libyan harbour and they wondered what would happen ...

Billy_BigBoy
12-23-2007, 02:31 AM
Originally posted by Platypus_1.JaVA:
Some years ago, I wanted insurance for my bicycle. In the event of a nuclear or thermonuclear explosion, your bike is not insured. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif How typical of the Dutch.


Even if you can show them 2 keys? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif
That's why I kept my second key save in a shelter under my house. No need for that anymore.

ViktorViktor
12-23-2007, 01:48 PM
As a young adult, I remember drills where we would file down to the basement of the largest local building when a simulated nuclear attack took place -

A couple of years later I was told 'off the record' that the point of all of us gathering in the basement of the building was not to protect us from the blast or fallout as this was futile in our case, but in order to spare future searchers of the time and expense used in looking over the whole area for our remains later.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif