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View Full Version : OT kinda: Just watched movie "12 O'Clock High"



SithSpeeder
07-25-2006, 11:15 AM
OOoooooh, this movie pained me in the first ten minutes as they belly landed a B-17 "for the movie".

But overall, it was an interesting treatise of leadership at all levels. Only in the last part of the movie was there much (real) aerial footage from WW2.

It won some awards in 1949 and is recommended viewing. I borrowed a DVD copy at my library http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif .

* _54th_Speeder *

sokil
07-25-2006, 11:58 AM
It is an awesome scene though, considering that it was done with a real plane without computer assistance.

BOA_Allmenroder
07-25-2006, 01:46 PM
The crash was done at then Cairns Army Airfield, Daleville, Alabama.

Cairns AAF still exists and is the home airfield of the US Army Aviation Center.

turnipkiller
07-25-2006, 01:55 PM
I don't really know why, but that is one of my favourite movies. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif
If I recall, the same crash scene is used in The War Lover with Steve McQueen.

Sergio_101
07-25-2006, 04:34 PM
Don't be bummed out about the belly landed B-17.
all those B-17's in the movie were about to
be turned into pots and pans, and were soon after.
The B-17s were supplied by the USAF knowing
they would be used and possibly destroyed in
the making of the movie.

One may have survived in bits and pieces as
a static movie prop.
It's the plane used for the close up's of Greg Peck
and crew in flight.

If you have the DVD, stop the action and you will see scars on the plane common to
all the close up's.
The Studio only re-painted it.

GREAT movie, maybe the finest war movie ever.

Sergio

SithSpeeder
07-25-2006, 05:15 PM
Don't be bummed out about the belly landed B-17.
all those B-17's in the movie were about to
be turned into pots and pans, and were soon after.
Don't be BUMMED? C'mon, man! Isn't that sad? What if the guy who was buying them for scrap metal saved them and restored them. Do you know how much they would be worth from a business perspective nowadays? From a historical perspective?! We're talking flyable B-17s here!

Maybe it's just me, but I would kill for one of those http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif .

* _54th_Speeder *

Jagdgeschwader2
07-25-2006, 05:40 PM
Originally posted by SithSpeeder:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Don't be bummed out about the belly landed B-17.
all those B-17's in the movie were about to
be turned into pots and pans, and were soon after.
Don't be BUMMED? C'mon, man! Isn't that sad? What if the guy who was buying them for scrap metal saved them and restored them. Do you know how much they would be worth from a business perspective nowadays? From a historical perspective?! We're talking flyable B-17s here!

Maybe it's just me, but I would kill for one of those http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif .

* _54th_Speeder * </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If that scene upset you then make sure you never watch The Best Years of Our Lives. There is an entire graveyard of B-17's being shredded by a wrecking crane. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

Sergio_101
07-26-2006, 03:39 AM
"The Best Years of Our Lives" is a poor movie,
but it's a excellent source for video of some
extinct aircraft.
Notable are shots of unusual B-17s such as the
YB-40 version.

There are other bad movies that have excellent
footage such as "The Strategic Air Command" with
General James Stewart starring.
Yes, Jimmy Stewart was a real life USAF general.
"The Strategic Air Command" is notworthy for it's
excellent B-36 and B-47 footage.

Unfortunately most war movies suck, and most
aviation movies are really sub par "B" movies.

But if you don't mind lame acting and plots
there are some awesome photo's in many.

As to the scrapping of WWII aircraft.
At the end of WWII the US was sitting
on ten's of thousands of combat planes.
The reasons for the mass scrapping of them
are not always so obvious.

#1 reason was the re-sale of all those bombers and
transports would have sent Boeing and Douglass
out of business.


Sergio

horseback
07-26-2006, 12:03 PM
First of all, with the war over, those aircraft were more valuable as scrap than as operating aircraft. Creating household goods out of those aircraft provided a lot of jobs for returning veterans, and those household goods were cheap and plentiful enough that some of them made their way overseas.

Before the war, things like refridgerators and washing machines were pretty rare in most countries. They became standard equipment once the economies of the free world got going in the early '50s, and those first recycled materials literally 'primed the pump.'

Second, can you imagine the chaos that would have ensued had the US Government sold those a/c and other war materials to the highest bidders instead of scrapping them? Every nit-nat dictator in the world would have had a very powerful (paper) Air Force and been looking for a fight with everyone in (his imagined) reach. South America (for example)was enough of a mess back then without that kind of temptation...

Still, the thought of buying a Mustang with a spare V-1650 or two for under $10,000 does have the drool dripping off my chin.

cheers

horseback

horseback
07-26-2006, 12:09 PM
By the way, I seem to recall "Best Years of Our Lives" won an Oscar for Best Picture, and most of the lead actors got nominations for their roles in it. My Mom always watched it on TV whenever it came on, and she would cry all the way through it, with short breaks for the commercials. It meant something to her generation, anyway.

Sorry it didn't have the requisite number of car chases and explosions for you, Sergio.

cheers

horseback

The.Tyke
07-26-2006, 02:17 PM
I spent some time in the Army (British) and 2 films were shown to Officer Cadets at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst to give some insight into leadership and morale problems, they were : 12 o clock High and Bridge on the River kwai. The only problem was that the instructors were only interested in how Gregory Peck restored leadership to his base and so the film was cut before the flying started !!

Enforcer572005
07-26-2006, 10:35 PM
What?? How horrible. No wonder Brit army officers always seem so......frustrated. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

Rjel
07-26-2006, 11:07 PM
I have to agree with Horseback. The Best Years of Our Lives is classic Hollywood. Classic in that it actually told it's story through character development, not special effects or excessive skin. If the scenes with Dana Andrews' character having nightmares or flashbacks while in the nose of the soon to be scraped B-17 don't get to you, then try the scene where Harold Russell's character Homer has to have his father put him to bed because Homer no longer has his hands. Now try to place yourself in the mindset of an audience only one year removed from WWII and these same scenes played out in real life every day. Give me that kind of story telling anytime.

Worf101
07-27-2006, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by horseback:
By the way, I seem to recall "Best Years of Our Lives" won an Oscar for Best Picture, and most of the lead actors got nominations for their roles in it. My Mom always watched it on TV whenever it came on, and she would cry all the way through it, with short breaks for the commercials. It meant something to her generation, anyway.

Sorry it didn't have the requisite number of car chases and explosions for you, Sergio.

cheers

horseback
+1 Glad you beat me to it Mate. TBYOOL is an amazing movie. The problems those guys came home to, while not as monumental as those faced by Russian, French or British vets, were just as real and wrenching as any that veterans have ever faced. The movie was/is excellent.

Da Worfster