PDA

View Full Version : internet speeds 101



taurusshoohyeah
11-29-2005, 11:16 PM
Information, or data, is most commonly measured in two (2) ways, BITS and BYTES.

A BIT is the smallest unit of measuring data and in the digital world, can only be one of 2 values, Zero (0) or One (1). This is the basis for all digital technology. BITS are commonly grouped together into larger units called BYTES

A BYTE is actually a group of eight (8) BITS. Therefore one BYTE is equal to eight (8) BITS

Now that you understand how data is measured, there are two common measurements for the rate at which data is transferred:

BYTES per second (Bps)
BITS per second (bps)

Notice the CAPITAL "B" and lowercase "b" in the abbreviations. The CAPITAL "B" typically denotes that the transfer rate is being measured in BYTES. A lowercase "b" typically denotes that the transfer rate is being measured in BITS.

You will often notice a capital "K" or "M" in front of the Bps/bps abbreviation. The "K" refers to the prefix "Kilo" or Thousands of Bps/bps. The "M" refers to the prefix "Mega" or Millions of Bps/bps. These same references are used in computer specifications like MB for MegaBytes, GB for GigaBytes (Billions of Bytes) and even TB for TeraBytes (Trillions of Bytes).

Now that you understand how data is measured and how speed is measured, we can answer the question: Why does your computer appear to be transferring information at only 70 KB/sec when a dial-up modem can transfer data at almost 56Kbps? At first glance, this may seem to be slow, but notice the abbreviation of KB/sec. This says that your speed is averaging 70 KiloBYTES every second. A dial-up modem can only transfer data at almost 56 KiloBITS every second. You can translate a reference of KBps into a reference of Kbps by multiplying the number by eight (8). Therefore, 70 KB/sec is really 560 Kb/sec which is 10 times as fast as a dial-up modem.

taurusshoohyeah
11-29-2005, 11:16 PM
Information, or data, is most commonly measured in two (2) ways, BITS and BYTES.

A BIT is the smallest unit of measuring data and in the digital world, can only be one of 2 values, Zero (0) or One (1). This is the basis for all digital technology. BITS are commonly grouped together into larger units called BYTES

A BYTE is actually a group of eight (8) BITS. Therefore one BYTE is equal to eight (8) BITS

Now that you understand how data is measured, there are two common measurements for the rate at which data is transferred:

BYTES per second (Bps)
BITS per second (bps)

Notice the CAPITAL "B" and lowercase "b" in the abbreviations. The CAPITAL "B" typically denotes that the transfer rate is being measured in BYTES. A lowercase "b" typically denotes that the transfer rate is being measured in BITS.

You will often notice a capital "K" or "M" in front of the Bps/bps abbreviation. The "K" refers to the prefix "Kilo" or Thousands of Bps/bps. The "M" refers to the prefix "Mega" or Millions of Bps/bps. These same references are used in computer specifications like MB for MegaBytes, GB for GigaBytes (Billions of Bytes) and even TB for TeraBytes (Trillions of Bytes).

Now that you understand how data is measured and how speed is measured, we can answer the question: Why does your computer appear to be transferring information at only 70 KB/sec when a dial-up modem can transfer data at almost 56Kbps? At first glance, this may seem to be slow, but notice the abbreviation of KB/sec. This says that your speed is averaging 70 KiloBYTES every second. A dial-up modem can only transfer data at almost 56 KiloBITS every second. You can translate a reference of KBps into a reference of Kbps by multiplying the number by eight (8). Therefore, 70 KB/sec is really 560 Kb/sec which is 10 times as fast as a dial-up modem.

polak5
11-30-2005, 12:17 AM
this is what i use for my info...
they got a nice forum 2

http://www.dslreports.com/stest