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Mulleteer
12-26-2004, 11:54 AM
Hi,

Many of you may have noticed that while flying it's pretty impossible to see what's in your low 12, 3 and 9 and on your 6. Did the pilots in WW2 have some kind of flying pattern how they avoided unpleasant surprises? For example, did they occasionally make zig zag to check six and quick dive to check whats ahead? How it would have worked in formation flying, I guess pulling random maneuvers would cause lots of collisions.
My guess is that they used F2 or Shift-F1 but I've got impression that servers had 'cockpit always on' on 40's.

Thanks

Mulleteer
12-26-2004, 11:54 AM
Hi,

Many of you may have noticed that while flying it's pretty impossible to see what's in your low 12, 3 and 9 and on your 6. Did the pilots in WW2 have some kind of flying pattern how they avoided unpleasant surprises? For example, did they occasionally make zig zag to check six and quick dive to check whats ahead? How it would have worked in formation flying, I guess pulling random maneuvers would cause lots of collisions.
My guess is that they used F2 or Shift-F1 but I've got impression that servers had 'cockpit always on' on 40's.

Thanks

jeroen-79
12-26-2004, 12:13 PM
Changing direction is a method.
And the risk of collisions wouldn't be extremely high.
Pilots wouldn't turn blindly and there would be some coordination between planes.

They weren't alone either.
What was invisible for one pilot was visible for the other.

Von_Zero
12-26-2004, 12:17 PM
How could ww2 pilots use F2? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/354.gif
IIRC, Johnny Johnson, in his book, "Wing leader" described how the schwarm formation could negate all these disadvantages of the planes. In such a formation, each pilot can watch the sky in areas where other pilots in the formation couldn't see.
Bf-109 pilots usualy did zig-zags to check their six.

berg417448
12-26-2004, 02:24 PM
Image of the Schwarm or "finger four" formation:

http://targetrabaul.com/documentation/images/form_finger4.jpg

LStarosta
12-26-2004, 03:51 PM
Assuming you weren't flying the Vic or any other wingtip to wingtip formation like idiots do, then you should have ample space (read: 300 or more meters) to make small maneuvers to check your odd angles. It's what loose formations like the Finger Four were developed for: to improve situational awareness.

Tully__
12-26-2004, 09:55 PM
Among the excellent reference article for sim pilots at SimHQ's Air Combat Library (http://www.simhq.com/_air/acc_library.html) is Andy Bush's excellent Tip's for online tactical formation flying (http://www.simhq.com/_air/air_013a.html) which deals with situational awareness.

TX-EcoDragon
12-26-2004, 10:41 PM
S turns aren't uncommon for any pilot to make, in particular when climbing and descending.

Mulleteer
12-30-2004, 11:23 AM
Lots of good info, thanks. I didn't realize how cruicial it was to keep proper formation.

Heavy_Weather
12-30-2004, 11:52 AM
in most stories i've read on formation flying in WWII, it seemed that a squadron would fly at a certain altitude while another one was up higher to cover them just in case they got bounced. seemed logical.