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View Full Version : Gliding is fun...



Bremspropeller
06-18-2007, 09:56 AM
...I got a track to prove it http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aumO0ZHwAro&NR

Viper2005_
06-18-2007, 10:08 AM
Yes, but not at the moment:

http://www.itadvice.co.uk/weatherjack/STARS.htm

Bremspropeller
06-18-2007, 11:58 AM
On Sunday an ASW28 crashed into a hill close to our field.
The accident happened during hang-gliding with several planes in the "circuit".

The pilot (a student) got to slow and stalled.
The a/c departed (being "helped" by the pilot who panicked, applied backpressure on the stick and kicked the wrong rudder), made two spin-rotations, crashed into the trees and plunged a further 15m to the ground.

Miracously he walked away almost unhurt - just a few scratches across his face.

My beloved ASW 28 is a writeoff now. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif
But what's more important is that he got away with only minor blessures.

skimbo
06-18-2007, 12:54 PM
Hi guys

I just watched taht video... awesome is all I can say.

Can you enlighten me on something? Is it expensive/difficult to learn to fly gliders?

Skimbo

Bremspropeller
06-18-2007, 01:14 PM
It's neither dificult, nor excessively expensive.

Just go out to the field, watch them and ask them if they could give you a ride.

skimbo
06-18-2007, 04:53 PM
Is it that easy to get a go?!

Cool http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Skimbo

HuninMunin
06-18-2007, 05:00 PM
In the most parts of Germany - yes ( only if you are polite of course and catch the right guys http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif )

Roblex
06-19-2007, 12:30 AM
I don't know about Germany but I belive that gliding in the US is a lot more expensive than he UK.

In the UK gliding is a kind of 'communal' affair. You are expected to turn up very early and help get the field set up for operations ie get aircraft out of the hangar and towed to the launch point, tow the winch out etc. then add your name to the flying list. Then you might spend the morning logging flights or retrieving landed aircraft with a tractor or beaten-up vehicle or controlling the launches before your turn to fly comes. At my last club the first job of the day was getting out the quad bike or a tractor and rounding up the sheep http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif At tmy first club I even learned to drive a roller to help extend the runway.

In the US they would usually have professional ground crew and you would just book a slot and turn up when it's time to fly as you do in power flying.

DD_GreyKnight
06-19-2007, 01:04 AM
Wow! That was an amazing Gliding video. I'm not used to seeing Gliders flying so low. That bit were the pair of the skimming the lake was awesome.

GK

Bremspropeller
06-19-2007, 05:07 AM
In the UK gliding is a kind of 'communal' affair. You are expected to turn up very early and help get the field set up for operations ie get aircraft out of the hangar and towed to the launch point, tow the winch out etc. then add your name to the flying list. Then you might spend the morning logging flights or retrieving landed aircraft with a tractor or beaten-up vehicle or controlling the launches before your turn to fly comes. At my last club the first job of the day was getting out the quad bike or a tractor and rounding up the sheep Smile At tmy first club I even learned to drive a roller to help extend the runway.


It's pretty much like that over here. Germany has propably the highest density of soaring-clubs world-wide.

You usually start at age 14 (you can start at any age..lol) and finish your license at 16-17.

Besides the flying itself, the club-atmosphere is a real gain.
Of couse there are clubs that lack atmosphere, but the field where I started (at age 14) was special.
Coming out to the field (40 kms away from my hometown) at friday afternoon, after school, was some special feeling. It was like going to holiday - nah, even more - like going into a parallel-world where you'd leave any troubles behind.
We usually stayed there the whole weekend, being driven home by fellow club-members on sunday evening.

In-between, being there was just the coolest thing on the planet:
You had your friends there, there was always an adventure out there (our field was right in the middle of nowhere), and last but not least, you were flying airplanes - aged 14!
We made a huge camp-fire every saturday night with some guys playing some music Sometimes they even played digeredoo (lol, that field was in the center of bavaria http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif ).

The other guys in school we're tryin to be cool by skating halfpipes. What did those ***s know about coolness? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Ah, those were the days. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

muchaclopiec
06-19-2007, 08:35 AM
At my last club the first job of the day was getting out the quad bike or a tractor and rounding up the sheep http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

hey roblex that sounds familiar..you werent at Seighford by any chance?

skimbo
06-19-2007, 12:38 PM
This is fantastic - what a grat way to get in the air for not much dosh!

Been checking out the web for gliding clubs in the UK - turns out theres one jsut up the road from me in Wareham. I live right on the south coast of England with the Purbeck hills about 25 miles from me - the prospect of being in a silent aircraft soaring over this beautiful Jurassic coastline has got me salivating...

Was gonna check it out this weekend but remembered - its my first year of marriage (read matrydom!) this weekend and I'm going away.

This is something I'm definitely going to look into.

Thanks for the post!

Skimbo

general_kalle
06-19-2007, 03:50 PM
ive Tried it, its fun.
you get impressed by the speed and how little stick movement thats needed before you can feel the G,

Philipscdrw
06-19-2007, 05:52 PM
It's great fun! I reckon it's less than a tenth of the cost of powered flying in the UK. But to be honest I'd be suprised (and delighted!) if you could just show up and get a free flight in the UK - I think a lot of clubs charge for trial flights/lessons. Mine does (the Bath Wilts & North Dorset) - I think it's 30 for a winch launch and a day's membership (so any subsequent flights are at the club rates of ~7 per winch launch), or 100 for an aerotow and a month's membership.

Completely agree with Roblex about the communal aspect - it's much more sociable than what I've seen of powered flight. Although a glassfibre glider is quite a different animal to a Cessna or Piper - in the spamcans you're flying over the ground, admiring the view and navigating until you arrive at the destination, but in a glider you're flying through the air - the airmass is your main concern, you're looking for thermals and clouds and other aircraft more than anything else.

Roblex
06-21-2007, 01:36 PM
Also, for you IL2 crowd who are used to throwing aircraft around..... you fly a glider with your fingertips at steep roll angles!

Turning finals in a Cessna means a slow turn at about 20 degrees of bank a long way out and descend gently; in a glider you push the stick over and scream round at not less than 45 degrees then dive at the ground with your airbrakes out http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

If you want to really act like a fighter pilot though you should become a tug pilot. Many clubs use crop sprayers as they have powerful engines and as the pilots get paid per launch they have a habit of peeling off into a spiral dive as soon as the glider releases and screaming back to the base at high speed to get the next glider hooked up http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

slipBall
06-21-2007, 01:47 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif A shame about the craft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif...now lets have more beir, brats, and boobies http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif