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Wallstein
03-30-2004, 12:53 AM
THIS IS A TRUE STORY OF A CHILD IN THE WWII. It really does not belong to this
site, which I appologize, but you may find this amusing.
I have been thinking for a long weather to write this or not, but now I think this story
is worth telling to the world.

This happened in Finland during the second world war. My grandmother was an
opera singer. During the the war she was ordered to serve in the entertaining troops.

In those days there were German troops in Finland fighting against the Russians
along with the Finish army. My mother (born in 1937) was a little child and at the
age of five (in 1942) grandmother took her with her to the tours in the front. That is
how my mother got in touch with both the Finnish and the German soldiers.
Seen with the eyes of a five years old girl, the soldiers seemed dirty, awfull, sceary,
stinky etc. The entertainment was organized rather close to the front for the ordinary
soldiers. My mother saw also wounded and handicapped soldiers which was very shocking to a child - naturally.
Now begins the "funny" part of the story. Amongst the German divisions in Finland
there was also one SS-division. In this particular division there was an extremely
good band. My grandmother told me that those men were drawn from the BERLIN
PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTA. And the thing being so, the Finnish entertainment
unit did some co-operation with those musicians. At this point we need to know, that
these musicians were not really soldiers, but they served in the band. BUT THEY
WORE THE WAFFEN SS UNIFORM. And this plays a big role in this story.

My grandmother (and my mother) made friends with THOSE SS-MEN. And because
these men were not combatants, they were clean, fresh and understandably they
behaved well. These men were - as anyone would be - lucky and happy to serve in
Finland and not in dangerous areas. For here they were safe! (That was not the case
for most of the Wehrmacht and Waffen SS.)

Okay! In the many occassions like evening gatherings these musicians (wearing the
waffen SS uniform) sang together with Finns. They all were professionals and they
sang beautifully in polyphonic tunes. These SS-men also tended to bring gifts to my
mother, like dolls, chocolate, candy... some of them took my mother on his lap, sang a
lullaby with tears in their eyes and showed pictures of their own children.
My mother was never in contact with the real waffen SS (most likely their own
orchestra was responsible for their entertainment and never the Finns). And that is how my mother got an impression, that the war was horrible suffering with one
exception: the Waffen SS (please understand this story correctly).

From the musicians of the SS-division my mother got presents, lullabies, kisses and
hugs. She was treated as a "foster child" for the homesick musicians. With them she felt happy and safe. And this becomes even more important when we hear, that my grandmother got bread, butter and all kind of consumersâ´ goods not available in wartime Finland. It must have been obvious for a child, that the SS-men were the salvation, they were the good men in the world of misery, fear and horror surrounding her everywhere! With the SS there was no hunger. Any child would have thought
this way under conditions she lived in!

I have to point out the fact again, that my mother was not in contact with the real Waffen SS at all, but only the Berlin Philharmonics Please remember that!

IN 1990 IN SPAIN I met a polish veteran (served in Normandy 1944), who had lost his family under the Nazi Regime. He haited the Germans and hadnâ´t forgiven them and
would never do! My parents lived in Spain and they had a dinner one night, where the Polish veteran was invated as well. In the beatifull evening the discussion turned into the wartime. He wanted to hear about Finns, how did we survive and how we got foods and everything. He was explained carefully all the details we could remember and then my mother started to tell her part of the story.

My mother had not heard all the discussion, so she did not know, that our guest was a veteran and that his family had been murdered in Poland by the Nazis. My mother started her story smiling happily, that "those days were horrible, but we were lucky to have the Germans in our country!" I was shocked, because I understood what was going to happen next: She would start PRAISING THE WAFFEN SS, how they were generous, how they saved families by giving food, how they were goodlooking in their clean uniforms, how they sang well etc... (This what my mother used to every now and then when talking about the wartime)BUT SHE HAD NOT STARTED THIS
SENTENCE YET!

I started to kick my mothers feet under the table, started coughing up a lot and making all kind of noise to interrupt her. The Polish veteran thought I was in trouble and wanted to help me. He smashed at my back and offered a cup of water to clean my throat. I kept coughing, stood up and cleared my throat. (all that was acting, as you understand). Then, after a moment I sat down at the table and started a whole new topick.
Later I could explain to mother was going to happen. It would have been the most embarrising evening ever, if my mother would have praised to Waffen SS to the Polish
Veteran. Remember, my mother had failed to hear, that our guestâ´s family was murdered during the war. Finally, it was difficult enough to explain what our guest had allready heard..."we were lucky to have the Germans in our country..." He understood when he heard all the facts.

That was close to catastrophe. LOL

[This message was edited by Wallstein on Tue March 30 2004 at 12:17 AM.]

[This message was edited by Wallstein on Tue March 30 2004 at 12:22 AM.]

Wallstein
03-30-2004, 12:53 AM
THIS IS A TRUE STORY OF A CHILD IN THE WWII. It really does not belong to this
site, which I appologize, but you may find this amusing.
I have been thinking for a long weather to write this or not, but now I think this story
is worth telling to the world.

This happened in Finland during the second world war. My grandmother was an
opera singer. During the the war she was ordered to serve in the entertaining troops.

In those days there were German troops in Finland fighting against the Russians
along with the Finish army. My mother (born in 1937) was a little child and at the
age of five (in 1942) grandmother took her with her to the tours in the front. That is
how my mother got in touch with both the Finnish and the German soldiers.
Seen with the eyes of a five years old girl, the soldiers seemed dirty, awfull, sceary,
stinky etc. The entertainment was organized rather close to the front for the ordinary
soldiers. My mother saw also wounded and handicapped soldiers which was very shocking to a child - naturally.
Now begins the "funny" part of the story. Amongst the German divisions in Finland
there was also one SS-division. In this particular division there was an extremely
good band. My grandmother told me that those men were drawn from the BERLIN
PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTA. And the thing being so, the Finnish entertainment
unit did some co-operation with those musicians. At this point we need to know, that
these musicians were not really soldiers, but they served in the band. BUT THEY
WORE THE WAFFEN SS UNIFORM. And this plays a big role in this story.

My grandmother (and my mother) made friends with THOSE SS-MEN. And because
these men were not combatants, they were clean, fresh and understandably they
behaved well. These men were - as anyone would be - lucky and happy to serve in
Finland and not in dangerous areas. For here they were safe! (That was not the case
for most of the Wehrmacht and Waffen SS.)

Okay! In the many occassions like evening gatherings these musicians (wearing the
waffen SS uniform) sang together with Finns. They all were professionals and they
sang beautifully in polyphonic tunes. These SS-men also tended to bring gifts to my
mother, like dolls, chocolate, candy... some of them took my mother on his lap, sang a
lullaby with tears in their eyes and showed pictures of their own children.
My mother was never in contact with the real waffen SS (most likely their own
orchestra was responsible for their entertainment and never the Finns). And that is how my mother got an impression, that the war was horrible suffering with one
exception: the Waffen SS (please understand this story correctly).

From the musicians of the SS-division my mother got presents, lullabies, kisses and
hugs. She was treated as a "foster child" for the homesick musicians. With them she felt happy and safe. And this becomes even more important when we hear, that my grandmother got bread, butter and all kind of consumersâ´ goods not available in wartime Finland. It must have been obvious for a child, that the SS-men were the salvation, they were the good men in the world of misery, fear and horror surrounding her everywhere! With the SS there was no hunger. Any child would have thought
this way under conditions she lived in!

I have to point out the fact again, that my mother was not in contact with the real Waffen SS at all, but only the Berlin Philharmonics Please remember that!

IN 1990 IN SPAIN I met a polish veteran (served in Normandy 1944), who had lost his family under the Nazi Regime. He haited the Germans and hadnâ´t forgiven them and
would never do! My parents lived in Spain and they had a dinner one night, where the Polish veteran was invated as well. In the beatifull evening the discussion turned into the wartime. He wanted to hear about Finns, how did we survive and how we got foods and everything. He was explained carefully all the details we could remember and then my mother started to tell her part of the story.

My mother had not heard all the discussion, so she did not know, that our guest was a veteran and that his family had been murdered in Poland by the Nazis. My mother started her story smiling happily, that "those days were horrible, but we were lucky to have the Germans in our country!" I was shocked, because I understood what was going to happen next: She would start PRAISING THE WAFFEN SS, how they were generous, how they saved families by giving food, how they were goodlooking in their clean uniforms, how they sang well etc... (This what my mother used to every now and then when talking about the wartime)BUT SHE HAD NOT STARTED THIS
SENTENCE YET!

I started to kick my mothers feet under the table, started coughing up a lot and making all kind of noise to interrupt her. The Polish veteran thought I was in trouble and wanted to help me. He smashed at my back and offered a cup of water to clean my throat. I kept coughing, stood up and cleared my throat. (all that was acting, as you understand). Then, after a moment I sat down at the table and started a whole new topick.
Later I could explain to mother was going to happen. It would have been the most embarrising evening ever, if my mother would have praised to Waffen SS to the Polish
Veteran. Remember, my mother had failed to hear, that our guestâ´s family was murdered during the war. Finally, it was difficult enough to explain what our guest had allready heard..."we were lucky to have the Germans in our country..." He understood when he heard all the facts.

That was close to catastrophe. LOL

[This message was edited by Wallstein on Tue March 30 2004 at 12:17 AM.]

[This message was edited by Wallstein on Tue March 30 2004 at 12:22 AM.]

Leech_
03-30-2004, 01:27 AM
Some sensitive things these are

No doubt that the polish veteran would have been deeply offended without knowing the background story of your mother. She would have looked an ignorant nazi sympahizer in the eyes of the polish veteran. However you handled it very well.

good read!

Cheers,
Leech / Lufthunden
www.lufthunden.com (http://www.lufthunden.com)

Wallstein
03-30-2004, 03:42 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Leech_:
Some sensitive things these are

No doubt that the polish veteran would have been deeply offended without knowing the background story of your mother.
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes, thatâ´s true. In a way this is very tragicomical story: there is a woman whoâ´s best recollection of the wartime is the Waffen SS. Anybody could misunderstand it without knowing the backgrounds. But I tend to tell this as a funny anecdote.

Have a nice day